10/29/2015 15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS ...

4 downloads 1145 Views 26MB Size Report
1Endocrinology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Bronx, NY ..... Initial evaluation included TSH (99.4%), thyroid ultrasound (US) (52.1% in clinic, ...... 2Department of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL.

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

[37–62] μmol/L; p=0.005) serum levels show (near­)significant responses to Triac treatment; whereas HR, BW and serum cholesterol levels show non­significant changes. Triac treatment effectively results in normalization of serum T3 levels. This interim analysis suggests that Triac treatment may have a beneficial effect on the peripheral phenotype of AHDS. A longer follow­up period and inclusion of more patients will further substantiate these findings. This abstract is submitted on behalf of the Triac Trial research group.

Short Oral Communication 17 Autoimmunity Monday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:00 PM ORBITAL FIBROBLAST HYPOXIC RESPONSE IMPACTS TISSUE REMODELING IN GRAVES' ORBITOPATHY G. Görtz1, M. Horstmann1, B. Delos Reyes2, J. Fandrey2, A. Eckstein1, U. Berchner­Pfannschmidt1 1Molecular Ophthalmology, University Duisburg­Essen, Essen, Germany 2Institute of Physiology, University Duisburg­Essen, Essen, Germany

Purpose: The complex pathophysiology of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) includes orbital inflammation, adipogenesis and fibrosis mediated by orbital fibroblasts (OF). However, inflammation and tissue expansion are well known to cause tissue hypoxia and consequently induce hypoxia­dependent signaling in cells. In this study we investigated the hypoxic response in OF and its impact on tissue remodeling in GO. Methods: Orbital fibroblasts were derived from orbital fat biopsies of GO patients and control healthy persons undergoing plastic surgery (Ctrl). To investigate the general hypoxic response in OF we analyzed HIF­1 (Hypoxia­ inducible factor­1) dependent gene expression by Western­blot, immunofluorescence, RTPCR and ELISA. Involvement of oxygen label HIF­1α or HIF­2α subunits was proved using siRNA approach. The vascularization of the orbital tissue was quantified with CD31­immunostained sections. The impact of hypoxic conditions on adipogenic differentiation was analyzed with Oil Red O staining. Results: In response to hypoxia the oxygen label HIF­1α was more pronounced stabilized in GO­OF than in Ctrl­OF and correlated with clinical activity score of GO patients while HIF­2α was not expressed. These findings strongly suggest that hypoxic HIF­1α signaling is involved in pathogenesis of GO. Consequently, HIF­1α dependent gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), glucose transporter 1 and adiponectin was strongly induced in GO­derived OF. Furthermore, VEGF secretion of GO­OF was enhanced which can stimulate angiogenesis. In agreement with this, we found vessel density increased in GO fat tissue by quantification of CD31 histology. Moreover, hypoxia just like TSHR stimulation strongly stimulated adipogenesis of GO­derived OF. Conclusions: Our results indicate that hypoxia impacts tissue remodeling and fat expansion in GO by stimulating angiogenesis and adipogenesis. GO­derived OF which show a stronger hypoxic response than Ctrl­OF, contribute with increasing VEGF secretion and adipogenic differentiation.

Short Oral Communication 18 Autoimmunity Monday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:06 PM REPLICATION OF GRAVES' ORBITOPATHY MOUSE MODEL IN TWO CENTRES REVEALS A LONG TERM T CELL RESPONSE TO TSH­RECEPTOR ANTIGEN U. Berchner­Pfannschmidt1, S. Moshkelgosha1, B. Edelmann2, S. Diaz­Cano3, G. Görtz1, M. Horstmann1, A. Noble4, W. Hansen5, A. Eckstein1, J. Banga6,1 1Molecular Ophthalmology, University Duisburg­Essen, Essen, Germany 2Institute of Molecular Biology, University Duisburg­Essen, Essen, Germany 3Department of Pathology, King's College Hospital NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom 4Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, King's College London, London, United Kingdom 5Instiute of Medical Microbiology, University Duisburg­Essen, Essen, Germany 6Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London School of Medicine, London, United Kingdom

We recently described a new model of experimental Graves' orbitopathy (GO), induced by close field genetic immunisation of hTSHR A­subunit plasmid by muscle electroporation in female BALB/c mice. The induced antibodies to TSHR lead to onset of either hyper­ or hypothyroidism, with the orbital pathology developing over few months post­ immunisation, characterised by muscle inflammation, adipogenesis and fibrosis. In this follow up study we investigated the reproducibility of the model and T cell responses to the TSH receptor. Given the complexity of the immunisation procedure and long time frame for disease development, we have examined the role of environment by studying reproducibility of the model, run in parallel in two different centres using essentially identical strains of BALB/c mice maintained in conventional clean rooms. Moreover, the role of antigen specific T cells to TSHR antigen was examined using multi­dye proliferation assays and whether this correlates with signs of disease by orbital pathology. Independent histopathological evaluation showed concordant orbital tissue damage in mice undergoing GO in the two centres, manifest by perifascicular atrophy of orbital muscles and/or onset of adipogenesis and fibrosis. Quantification of the respective changes showed variable degrees in individual mice just like observed in GO patients. A total disease score was set up for evaluation of the mouse model and revealed statistically significant disease onset. Furthermore, high T cell responses in vitro to TSHR antigen in both the centres provide evidence on the critical role of cell mediated immunity to orbital pathology. Although no inflammatory infiltrate was apparent in the orbital tissue in either of the centres, the appearances are consistent with a dysimmune myopathy by ‘hit and run' immune­mediated inflammatory event that results in orbital tissue damage. Our results show that the new model is robust, which reproducibly resamples the clinical features of GO patients

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

10/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

allowing mechanistic studies into disease pathogenesis and evaluation of novel therapeutic approaches.

Short Oral Communication 19 Autoimmunity Monday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:12 PM ORBITAL FIBROBLASTS FROM GRAVES' ORBITOPATHY PATIENTS MEET ALL CRITERIA THAT DEFINE MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS S. Brandau2, G. Görtz1, S. Mattheis2, S. Lang2, A. Eckstein1, U. Berchner­Pfannschmidt1 1Molecular Ophthalmology, University Duisburg­Essen, Essen, Germany 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Duisburg­Essen, Essen, Germany

In Graves' orbitopathy (GO) inflammation, adipogenesis and fibrosis of the orbital tissue is the result of activation and differentiation of orbital fibroblasts (OF). In a previous study we observed OF expressed some of the consensus surface marker described for mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). To further elucidate the MSC characteristics of OF we compared them with orbital MSC. We simultaneously obtained OF and MSC with different isolation methods from the same retrooular fat biopsies of GO patients. The biological characteristics of these cell lines were compared along criteria that define MSC suggested by the International Society for Cellular Therapy: 1. Plastic adherence and fibroblastic­like growth, 2. MSC surface marker profile, 3. Multi­lineage differentiation potential. Furthermore we compared the immunomodulatory function of orbital MSC and OF. To this purpose suppression of T cell proliferation and cytokine production was measured. We obtained the following biological characteristics of the cell lines: 1. Orbital MSC were plastic adherent fibroblast­ like cells that proliferate and produce hyaluronan similar to OF. 2. Both, the MSC and the OF expressed a MSC surface marker profile: they were positive for CD29, CD73, CD90, CD105 and negative for CD31, CD34, CD45 and CD71. 3. Orbital MSC as well as OF displayed adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, myogenic and neuronal differentiation potential in response to specific differentiation media, although OF with a lower capacity. In addition, when compared to MSC, the OF showed less suppressive effect on T cell proliferation and secreted less amounts IL­6 suggesting a lower immunosuppressive potential. Herein we report on the isolation and characterization of orbital fat­derived MSC from GO patients. Comparative analysis of orbital MSC with OF revealed strong similarities: both meet all criteria that define mesenchymal stem cells.

Short Oral Communication 20 Autoimmunity Monday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:18 PM FAILURE OF G PROTEIN ACTIVATION BY TSH RECEPTOR ANTIBODIES DICTATES THYROCYTE DEATH ­ IMPLICATIONS FOR AUTOIMMUNITY S.A. Morshed1,2, R. Ma1,2, R. Latif1,2, T. Davies1,2 1Endocrinology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Bronx, NY 2Thyroid Research Unit, James J Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY

Antibodies to the TSHR (TSHR­Abs) may activate TSHR signaling or inhibit TSH action. However, the consequences of TSHR signaling may differ. In particular, there is a marked contrast between stimulating TSHR­Abs which recognize conformational epitopes and can induce thyroid hormone synthesis and secretion compared to TSHR­Abs to linear epitopes in the “cleavage” region (C­TSHR­Ab, sometimes called neutral antibodies) of the ectodomain which may induce thyroid cell apoptosis if unopposed. By using luciferase reporter assays for Gαs, Gαq, Gβg and Gα12, examining live cell imaging, immunostaining and immunoblot analyses. We demonstrated that stimulating TSHR­Abs (S­TSHR­Ab) produced activation of Gαs and to a lesser extent Gαq but C­TSHR­Abs were unable to activate G proteins and failed to induce endosomal vesicular trafficking leaving the antibodies trapped inside the cytoplasm. While S­TSHR­Ab­ and TSH­receptor complexes undergo normal vesicular trafficking (>90% over 3 days)) the C­TSHR­Ab­receptor complexes failed to do so (0.4 or pN1mac and LNR≤0.4; and high, pN1mac and LNR>0.4). We investigated the association of the classified groups and variable clinicopathologic factors. Among 580 patients (pN1mic : 205, pN1mac : 375), there were 171 males and 409 females. Extrathyroidal extension (ETE), tumor size and the Lateral LN metastasis were associated with larger m­LN size (P140%). A total of 1339 serum samples were collected from 706 HT patients with either overt TAO (n=38/706, 5.4%, 33 female, mean age±SD 46±15.7 years) or without TAO (n=668, 94.6%, 555 female, 35.2±18.3 years), as well as from 302 euthyroid healthy donors (155 female, 28±8 years). All controls were TSAb negative (SRR% 53±16). Compared to patients with HT only (SRR% 67±73.2), serum TSAb levels were markedly higher in HT+TAO (243.5±189.7, p20 passages. RPPA, Western blot, and qRT­PCR, were used to assess EMT marker expression and pathway activation. 3D Matrigel invasion, immunofluorescence microscopy, and direct cell count growth assays were used to assess inhibitor resistance and metastatic phenotypes. Sequenom was used to detect acquired mutations. A vemurafenib resistant (VR) subline of KTC1 cells was derived following long­term treatment with the drug. Resistance coincided with spontaneous acquisition of a KRAS (G12D) activating mutation. No resistance was observed in the control and another treated subline (vemurafenib sensitive, VS). Increases in activated AKT, ERK, and EGFR were observed in the VR subline. In the VS subline, increases in activated AKT and HER3 in the presence of vemurafenib were observed. The VR/KRAS mutant line was less susceptible to combinations of ERK (GDC0994) and PI3K (LY29002) inhibitors. Increased expression of distinct EMT markers was observed in both treated sublines; however only the KRAS mutant line demonstrated increased invasive properties. Our results suggest an acquired KRAS mutation confers BRAF (V600E) inhibitor resistance and a more aggressive metastatic phenotype in vitro. This is supported by studies associating the presence of an activating KRAS mutation and more aggressive PTC variants.

Short Oral Communication 100 Thyroid Cancer Tuesday Short Oral Communication Basic 1:18 PM PAPILLARY THYROID CANCER­DRIVING ONCOGENE BRAFV600E INDUCES TOLL­LIKE RECEPTOR 4 OVEREXPRESSION V. Peyret1, M. Nazar1, J.P. Nicola1, C.S. Fuziwara2, M. Montesinos1, C.G. Pellizas1, E.T. Kimura2, A.M. Masini­Repiso1 1Departamento de Bioquímica Clínica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Centro de

Investigaciones en Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología ­ Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Córdoba, Argentina 2Departamento de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento., Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas. Universidade de São

Paulo., São Paulo., Brazil Toll like receptors (TLRs) comprise a family of transmembrane proteins related to the Interleukin­1 receptor. Emerging evidence suggests that deregulated TLRs expression in tumor tissue promotes tumor survival signals, thus favoring tumor progression. Recently, aberrant TLR4 overexpression was demonstrated in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Aim: To study the mechanisms underlying TLR4 overexpression in PTC harboring the BRAFV600E mutation. TLR4 expression was evaluated in thyroid tissue derived from human PTCs and transgenic mice expressing BRAFV600E in thyrocytes (Tg­BRAFV600E mice) (immunohistochemistry and RT/qPCR). PCCl3 cells expressing BRAFV600E in response to doxycycline (PC­BRAFV600E) and BRAFV600E­positive PTC cell line BCPAP were used to study BRAFV600E­ driven TLR4 expression (western blot, RT/qPCR, and gene reporter assays). Immunohistochemistry analysis showed TLR4 overexpression in primary and metastatic human PTCs compared to normal thyroid tissue. Moreover, TLR4 expression was increased in thyroid tissue from Tg­BRAFV600E mice compared to littermate controls. Stimulation of doxycycline­treated PC­BRAFV600E and BCPAP cells with the TLR4 agonist lipopolysacharide induced the activation of the transcription factor NF­κB (5X NFκB­Luciferase reporter), suggesting functional TLR4 signaling. Doxycycline­induced BRAFV600E expression in PC­BRAFV600E cells upregulated TLR4 protein levels. BRAFV600E increased TLR4 expression at transcriptional level by stimulating TLR4 promoter activity. Deletion analysis of the TLR4 promoter revealed a distal mitogen­activated protein kinase (MAPK)­sensitive ETS binding­site critical for BRAFV600E­induced TLR4 expression. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of BRAFV600E and MEK/ERK signaling reduced TLR4 mRNA expression in the BRAFV600E­positive PTC cell line BCPAP.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

51/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Our findings revealed that the oncogene BRAFV600E induces functional TLR4 overexpression in thyroid cancer involving a MEK/ERK­dependent TLR4 gene transcriptional activation. Altogether, these data raise an intriguing question regarding the role of TLR4 signaling in the development and progression of PTC, opening new possibilities for the design of therapeutic approaches.

Short Oral Communication 101 Thyroid Cancer Tuesday Short Oral Communication Basic 1:24 PM A NOVEL MODULATOR OF CELLULAR INVASION AND METASTASIS IN THYROID CANCER W. Imruetaicharoenchoke1, R. Watkins1, N. Sharma1, E. Gentillin2, E. Bosseboeuf1, K. Perkin1, R. Fletcher1, H. Mehanna1, K. Boelaert1, M. Read1, J. Watkinson1, V. Smith1, C. McCabe1 1Centre for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of

Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom 2University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy

Metastasis is responsible for the majority of poor oncological outcomes, especially cancer deaths. The cortical actin binding protein cortactin is central to the recruitment of actin fibres at the periphery of the cell, promoting cellular movement. A precise understanding of cortactin's mechanisms of action is required to fully comprehend metastatic cell activity. We used mass spectrometry to identify protein binding partners and determined co­localisation and protein:protein interaction through immunofluorescence, Proximity Ligation Assays and co­immunoprecipitations (Co­IP). Boyden chamber assays were applied to examine cellular invasion. Western blotting and real­time PCR were used to characterise levels of gene expression in human papillary thyroid cancers (PTC). We identify the proto­oncogene PBF as a new functional binding partner of cortactin. PBF has recently been correlated with thyroid and breast cancer metastasis, and with decreased disease specific survival in thyroid cancer. Cortactin and PBF co­localised preferentially at the leading edge of migrating cells. Oncogenic over­expression of PBF induced potent cell invasion and migration in thyroid ( 14;p=0.01) and breast ( 14;p0.99). The mean values of det­CT was not different between Thy2 and Thy4/5 group, both in females (4.4±2.8 pg/ml (range 1.5–21.9 pg/ml) vs 4.7±3.5 pg/ml (range 1.5–21 pg/ml); p=0.87) and males (6.7±5.6 pg/ml (range 1.5–57.9 pg/ml) versus 8.1±7.8 pg/ml (range 1.7–37.9  pg/ml), p=0.62). In particular, Th4/Thy5 nodules were not associated with significant ipercalcitoninemia. In conclusion no differences in serum CT values were observed in nodular thyroid disease with or without autoimmunity and between nodules with benign or suspicious/malignant cytologies.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

58/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Short Oral Communication 115 Thyroid Nodules & Goiter Tuesday Short Oral Communication Clinical 1:18 PM THYROIDECTOMY DURING PREGNANCY: AN ANALYSIS OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF SURGEONS NATIONAL SURGICAL QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (ACS NSQIP) DATASET M.B. Albuja Cruz, D.A. Hirth, P. Hosokawa, A. Paniccia, C.D. Raeburn, R.C. McIntyre GI, Tumor and Endocrine Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO Thyroid surgery is often required in women of child bearing age, but there is a paucity of data regarding the perioperative risk for pregnant patients. The ACS NSQIP database from 2006–2012 was queried to obtain all female patients aged 12–50 years with CPT codes corresponding to thyroid lobectomy, thyroidectomy, or thyroidectomy with lymph node dissection. Preoperative, intra­ operative, post­operative (including complications), and discharge variables were collected and compared. 17,142 patients were identified, 109 (0.6%) of which were pregnant. 6426 underwent lobectomy including 31 pregnant patients, 8693 patients underwent thyroidectomy including 51 pregnant patients, and 2023 patients underwent thyroidectomy with neck dissection, including 27 pregnant patients. Preoperative variables were similar. Pregnant patients were more likely than non­pregnant patients to undergo thyroidectomy for hyperthyroidism (43% vs 16%, p20) elevations; FT3 by multiples of the upper limit of normal (ULN), i.e. FT3≤2.5xULN, 2.5–5xULN, or>5xULN, and FT4 by≤2xULN, 2.1–3xULN, or>3xULN. By logistic regression analyses, high TRAb was significantly associated with instances of abnormal LFT (P=0.008, OR 1.33–6.92) but not related to the levels of individual liver enzyme. TRAb levels were significantly associated with FT3 and FT4 elevation. Multivariate regression of TRAB, FT3 and FT4 demonstrated the elevation in liver enzymes was associated more strongly with FT3 & FT4 than TRAb. However, in the subgroup with persistently abnormal LFT, the initial FT3 and FT4 levels were not associated with the occurrence of initial LFT abnormality. Our data demonstrates that GD is most commonly associated with abnormal levels of GGT and that abnormal LFT is more directly linked to the degree of thyrotoxicosis than levels of TRAB. † He K et al. Hepatic dysfunction related to thyrotropin receptor antibody. Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes 2014.

Poster 129 Autoimmunity Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM POLYMORPHISM OF KILLER CELL IMMUNOGLOBULIN RECEPTORS (KIRS) AND HLA IN GRAVES' DISEASE H. Zhang1,2, C. Guo1, J. LI1, J. Zhao1,2 1Department of Endocrinology, Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, China 2Shandong Clinical Medical Center of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Jinan, China

Graves' disease (GD) is one of organ­specific autoimmune diseases. The defect of immunosuppression plays an important role in the initial stage, and the pathogenesis is not elucidated. Natural Killer (NK) cell is a kind of important immune regulator. Several abnormalities of NK cell activity in GD patients have been described, but the results were controversial. Interactions between killer cell immunoglobulin­like receptors (KIRs) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands regulate the activity of NK cell. The aim of this study is to determine whether certain KIR/HLA genotype combinations play a role in the pathogenesis of GD, and to investigate the activity of NK cell in GD patients. 118 unrelated GD patients and 108 random healthy individuals were enrolled in a case­control study. Peripheral blood was collected for DNA extraction. Genotyping KIR genes and HLA­C alleles were acquired by polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific primers (PCR­SSP), followed by electrophoresis on an agarose gel.95 Graves' disease patients and 83 healthy controls were enrolled to detect the surface molecules of peripheral blood mononuclear cell, including CD3, CD56 and CD69, using flowcytometry. Frequency of KIR2DS1(+)HLA­CwLys(+) was significantly lower in the GD patients than in the controls (5.93% vs 17.59%, p40), respectively. Five GD patients with biologically confirm hyperthyroidism were positive with the TSI assay and negative with the TRAb method.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

73/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Our preliminary data showed excellent analytical and clinical performances for this novel fully automated assay with enhanced specificity for stimulating antibodies. However, the performances will need to be confirmed by comparison to a bioassay.

Poster 148 Disorders of Thyroid Function Monday & Tuesday Poster Basic 9:00 AM THE FLAME RETARDANT DE­71 INHIBITS HUMAN THYROID CELL FUNCTION T.M. Kronborg1, J.F. Hansen1, Å.K. Rasmussen1, L. Ramhøj2, U. Feldt­Rasmussen1 1Department of Medical Endocrinology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark 2National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Søborg, Denmark

Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) affect thyroid function, which is essential for general growth and metabolism. Flame retardants are a group of EDC's containing polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE's), used worldwide to reduce flammability in e.g. upholstery and electronic equipment. Production is banned, but there will be a continuous release from existing products for many years. There seems to be an influence on the thyroid homeostasis, and the aim of this study was to investigate a possible direct effect of the flame retardant mixture DE­71 on human thyroid cell function in vitro. Primary human thyroid cells were obtained as paraadenomatous tissue from thyroidectomies. The tissue was cut into small pieces and cells extracted by incubation with collagenase I/dipase II. The cells were starved for TSH in 3 days before addition of DE­71 (0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, 10 and 50 μg/mL) for 72 h in presence of TSH. Cell supernatants were harvested and centrifuged before analysis of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) (competitive protein binding assay) and thyroglobulin (Tg) (ELISA). An inhibitory dose­response effect of DE­71 on TSH stimulated thyrocytes was found (n=13 cell cultures). Maximal inhibition were found in cells exposed to 50 μg/mL where the Tg level were reduced by 71.9 % (range: 8.5–98.7%, n=7 cell cultures), and the mean cAMP­level was reduced by 95.1% (range: 91.5–98.8%, n=6 cell cultures) compared to controls. Ranges of controls were 16.7–2399.3 ng/mL and 32–1786 pmol/mL for Tg an cAMP respectively. DE­71 inhibits the thyroid cell function on a molecular level. This is relevant in the elucidating process regarding the specific effect of flame retardants. Further experiments are needed to confirm or disprove a direct causative influence of DE­71 on thyrocytes.

Poster 149 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Translational 9:00 AM EGFR AND HER2 EXPRESSION IN PAPILLARY THYROID CARCINOMA J. Kim Surgery, Catholic University Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital, Uijeongbu City, Korea (the Republic of) The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family plays a crucial role in the growth of malignant tumors. Among these genes, EGFR and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression and amplification are associated with an unfavorable prognosis and are important therapeutic targets in breast cancer. However, HER2 expression in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has rarely been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between EGFR and HER2 expression and clinicopathological factors of PTC in a single institution. One hundred and twenty nine consecutive patients with PTC were enrolled in this study and underwent thyroid surgery at Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital between October 2013 and February 2015. EGFR and HER2 protein expressions were evaluated in the 129 primary tumors by immunohistochemistry, and the results were compared with clinicopathological features. The degree of HER2 staining was scored as 0, 1, 2 or 3 according to the breast cancer criteria because no criteria for papillary thyroid carcinoma have been established. The cancer tissues that received scores of 2 or 3 were defined as positive for HER2 expression. Of the 129 tumors (papillary thyroid carcinoma), 112 (86.8%) were HER2 negative and 17 (13.2%) were HER2 positive. EGFR positivity was observed in 111 (86%) tumors. The mean age of the patients was 46.3±11.9 years (range 20–74 years). The mean tumor size was 1.08±0.75 cm (range 0.2–3.5 cm). cervical lymph node metastases were present in 47 (36.4%) patients. Tumor size, extrathyroidal extension, histologic type, and TNM stage were not significantly associated with HER2 expression. However,, HER2 expression was significantly associated with younger age (≤45 years) and cervical lymph node metastasis. High Ki­67 was significantly associated with EGFR expression (p=0.002). Also, Ki­67 was higher in HER2 expression group although not of statistical significance. Based on our data, it is not clear EGFR expression is associated with tumor aggressiveness in PTC. But HER2 expression is associated with lymph node metastases in PTC. To identify the prognostic value of HER2 expression, a long­term follow­up study will be needed.

Poster 150 Disorders of Thyroid Function Monday & Tuesday Poster 9:00 AM DI­(2­ETHYLHEXYL) PHTHALATE HAS LIMITED INFLUENCE ON HUMAN DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CELL FUNCTIONS IN VITRO J.F. Hansen1, M. Boas2, K. Main2, H. Frederiksen2, J. Hofman­Bang1, Å.K. Rasmussen1, U. Feldt­Rasmussen1

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

74/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

1Laboratory of Endocrinology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark 2Department of Growth and Reproduction, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark

Phthalates are suspected to influence thyroid function in epidemiologic and experimental in vivo studies. Aim of this study was to investigate if the differentiated function of primary human thyroid cell cultures was influenced by di­(2­ ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Human thyrocytes obtained from thyroidectomies and cultured to monolayers were exposed for 72 hours to DEHP (0.001 to 100 μM) in presence of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) (1 IU/l). Thyroglobulin (Tg) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) were quantified in cell supernatants (ELISA and competitive protein binding method, respectively). Gene expression of thyroid peroxidase (TPO), sodium iodine symporter (NIS), TSH receptor (TSHr) and Tg were quantified by real­time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT­qPCR). Two­way ANOVA and Tukey's post­hoc analysis was used for statistics (SAS­institute). A significant influence on cAMP­secretion, the second messenger of TSH, was demonstrated (p=0.0006, n=nine cultures in single determination). Post­hoc analysis demonstrated an inhibiting influence by 10 μM DEHP compared to control, 1, 0.1 and 0.01 μM DEHP. The estimated ratio (95% CI) of 10 μM DEHP compared to control, 1, 0.1 or 0.01  μM DEHP was 0.73 (0.58; 0.92), 0.76 (0.60; 0.96), 0.75 (0.60; 0.95) and 0.75 (0.59; 0.94), respectively. Neither Tg­ secretion nor gene­expression of TPO, NIS, TSHr and Tg were influenced by DEHP (p=0.76, 0.47, 0.59, 0.76 and 0.92, respectively). Although a high concentration of DEHP inhibited cAMP secretion in human thyroid cells, no influence on Tg­secretion or gene­expression of differentiated thyrocyte function was found. Furthermore the influence on cAMP secretion was not dose­dependent. Thus, the influence on the thyroid axis suggested in other studies does not seem to be caused by a DEHP­mediated effect on the thyroid gland itself.

Poster 151 Disorders of Thyroid Function Monday & Tuesday Poster 9:00 AM RESEMBLANCE AND DIVERSITY OF THE ACTIVITY OF GRAVES' DISEASE SEEN IN MONOZYGOTIC FEMALE TWINS OVER THE COURSE OF 20 YEARS N. Momotani, S. Iwama­Carlson Endocrinology, Tokyo Health Service Association, Tokyo, Japan Twin studies suggest that the development of Graves' disease (GD) is not determined only genetically, but environmental factors play a role. We report on a 20 year observation of GD in female twins, suggesting a significant contribution of environmental factors to the activity of GD. The twins (T1 and T2) were born in 1989 at 34 weeks of gestation. T1 had lower birth weight (2002g vs. 2500g). Their mother had been treated with methimazole (MMI) for GD, and the twins suffered from transient hyperthyroidism after birth. At 5 years of age, GD developed in T1, and MMI was initiated. TRAb values changed greatly and abruptly elevated from 13.9% to 85% (normal≤10%) in 1998, when GD developed in T2. T2 was treated with iodine because skin eruption occurred after the initiation of MMI. Her TRAb reached 88%. Their TRAb values became normal almost simultaneously in 2001. MMI in T1 and iodine in T2 were discontinued. After that, transient hyperthyroidism developed once every year for three years in both of them. They became thyrotoxic once again in 2004, and it was due to GD in T1 and painless thyroiditis in T2. After that event, they took quite a different course. In T1, the TRAb value became extremely high and she underwent a total thyroidectomy in 2011. The TRAb got to an undetectable level and she gave birth to a healthy baby in 2014. T2 remained in remission status until in 2012. It was when she got a job and moved to an area far from her family that GD relapsed, and iodine was initiated again. TRAb value reached as high as around 90% in 2014. Long­term follow up of Graves' disease in monozygotic twins may be valuable because it may elucidate how the environmental factors contribute to the development or the activation of Graves' disease. If we had taken notice of the event that the twins encountered, we could have learned more about it. The eventful course of GD seen in the monozygotic twins suggests that the timing of the development or the activity of GD is attributed to changing in magnitude of the contribution of environmental factors.

Poster 152 Disorders of Thyroid Function Monday & Tuesday Poster 9:00 AM WEEKLY INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTION OF LEVOTHYROXINE FOLLOWING MYXOEDEMA: A PRACTICAL SOLUTION TO AN OLD CRISIS P.N. Taylor1, A. Tabasum2, G. Sanki2, D. Burberry2, B. Tennant2, A. Aldridge2, O. Okosieme2,1, G. Das2 1Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom 2Prince Charles Hospital, Cardiff, United Kingdom

Myxoedema Coma is rare complication of hypothyroidism. Data on optimal management are limited given the limited number of case series. An 82 year­old female with known hypothyroidism was admitted to hospital after being found on the floor. On examination, she was unkempt, confused, bradycardic, hypothermic and barely arousable. Her initial biochemistry revealed a thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) of >100 mU/L, free thyroxine (FT4) of 1.5 pmol/L which supported a diagnosis of myxoedema coma. She was resuscitated and commenced on liothyronine, levothyroxine and hydrocortisone. Unfortunately she developed pulmonary oedema consequent to an acute coronary syndrome and needed diuresis, ionotropic support and assisted ventilation. She was stepped down to the ward where her thyroid function tests improved on a combination of oral levothyroxine and intravenous liothyronine and her free tri­

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

75/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

iodothyronine (FT3) was maintained in the lower half of the reference range. However it became apparent she was pouching and spitting out her oral levothyroxine as a result of impaired cognitive function. She was therefore maintained on IV liothyronine for longer than originally intended. Given the need for prompt alternative control we sought advice from international experts where intramuscular levothyroxine was recommended. She was therefore managed from day 50 onwards on intramuscular levothyroxine 200mcg once weekly, which was subsequently increased to 500mcg. She made continual cognitive and physical progress with stabilisation of her thyroid function and she was discharged to a rehabilitation hospital. Following continued improvement she was subsequently restarted on oral levothyroxine, with a plan for discharge home and close monitoring of her thyroid function in primary care. This report highlights the potential to use intramuscular levothyroxine in individuals with poor absorption or compliance even in severe hypothyroidism.

Poster 153 Disorders of Thyroid Function Monday & Tuesday Poster 9:00 AM MEDICALLY REFRACTORY HYPERTHYROIDISM IN A PATIENT WITH GRAVE'S DISEASE E. Cousin­Peterson1, L. Rivera Robles2, A. Hodes1 1Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 2Endocrinology, Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, FL

Hyperthyroidism affects 0.5% of the US population, resulting in a physiologic syndrome of thyrotoxicosis. Euthyroidism can generally be achieved with medical therapy alone or in conjunction with surgery, limiting the risk of perioperative thyroid storm. There are rare cases that medical management can't bring a patient to euthyroidism, in which more extreme treatment protocols must be used. We discuss a case of resistant thyrotoxicosis, the resulting treatments, and other medical options used in refractory cases. A 39 year old woman presented with tremors, palpitations, anxiety, and a visible goiter. She was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism following initial work­up. The patient was started on methimazole and propranolol. Her symptoms improved initially, but her thyrotoxicosis subsequently worsened despite maximum dose of methimazole. Her medication regimen was transitioned to increasing doses of propylthiouracil as well as propranolol. Despite this, she remained symptomatic, with progressive worsening of her thyroid function tests. Due to her resistant disease, she was admitted to the hospital for urgent total thyroidectomy. Pre­operatively, she was continued on PTU, propranolol, and started on SSKI and dexamethasone. The patient improved, displaying only mild tachycardia and shrinking of her thyroid goiter. She was near euthyroid pre­operatively. She underwent an uncomplicated total thyroidectomy and post­operative course. Surgical management of medically refractory hyperthyroidism is a widely accepted standard for definitive therapy. Refractory hyperthyroidism may be secondary to persistent Grave's disease, toxic nodular goiter, Amiodarone use, or Iodine­containing contrast. There exists the challenge of achieving a state of euthyroidism prior to urgent surgery in order to limit the risk of thyroid storm. We discuss adjunct medical therapies and more advanced modalities such as therapeutic plasma exchange and single­pass albumin dialysis that may represent options for rapid preparation of patients prior to surgery. Medically refractory thyrotoxicosis is a rare complication of hyperthyroidism. Non­traditional treatment options are utilized to ensure patient safety in the process of attaining definitive cure.

Poster 154 Disorders of Thyroid Function Monday & Tuesday Poster 9:00 AM NOT YOUR REGULAR THYROTOXICOSIS! ­ MEDICAL TREATMENT OF TSH SECRETING PITUITARY ADENOMA F. Dojki, D. Elson Endocrinology, University of Wisconsin­Madison, Madison, WI TSH­secreting adenomas are rare tumors, accounting for less than 2% of all pituitary tumors, and an even more rare cause of thyrotoxicosis. A 32 year old female was diagnosed with an incidental pituitary macroadenoma measuring 3.4 × 2.9 × 3.0 cm with local invasion on MRI brain performed for numbness and tingling of her left upper extremity. At the time she also reported worsening daily headaches, photophobia and tunnel vision causing inability to drive or read. She denied any symptoms of thyrotoxicosis. Physical exam revealed normal vital signs and no goiter. Formal visual field testing revealed bitemporal hemianopsia with decreased visual acuity and color vision. Initial labs revealed a TSH of 4.89uIU/mL (Reference range 0.47 to 4.68 uIU/mL), Free T4 2.38ng/dL (Ref range 0.78 to 2.19ng/dL), and Free T3 is

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

76/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

8.5pg/dL (Ref range 2.4 to 4.2pg/dL). Remaining pituitary axis including AM cortisol, ACTH, prolactin and IGF1 were within normal limits. Glycoprotein alpha subunit was 0.8 ng/mL (0.0–1.4) giving an alpha subunit to TSH molar ratio of 2.5 suggesting TSH secreting tumor. CT Angiogram of the head revealed left carotid cave and bilateral para­ ophthalmic aneurysms arising from the tumor margins, making her a poor surgical candidate. Monthly long acting octreotide was initiated. Within 4 months of follow­up she noticed an improvement in vision and she was able to read and drive again. Her tumor remained stable in size on follow­up MRI brain. 12 month follow­up labs showed Free T4 normal at 1.26 ng/dL, Free T3 normal at 3.9pg/dL with a corresponding TSH of 1.85 uIU/mL. Although trans­sphenoidal surgery remains the first­line treatment for TSH secreting adenomas, medical therapy is frequently required for invasive tumors. Given that native somatostatin inhibits TSH secretion, treatment with somatostatin analogues has been used with unresectable tumors or after surgery. Octreotide not only decreases TSH secretion by the tumor but can also cause shrinkage of tumor, restoration of euthyroid state, decreased goiter size and vision improvement. Somatostatin analogs represent a useful tool for long­term treatment of inoperable TSH secreting pituitary tumors.

Poster 155 Disorders of Thyroid Function Monday & Tuesday Poster 9:00 AM A CASE OF RESISTANCE TO THYROID HORMONE IN A FAMILY WITH HYPOTHYROIDISM AND ADHD T. Jaber1, D. Rodriguez­ Buritica2, S. Nader­Eftekhari1 1Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 2Medical Genetics, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX

Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a rare disease characterized by thyroid hormone resistance in target tissues. Mutations in THRB, which encodes the thyroid hormone receptor beta, is the most frequent cause of RTH, affecting around 1000 individuals who belong to some 300 families. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for RTH when the clinical picture consists of elevated thyroid hormones with unsuppressed TSH along with a family history of thyroid disease and ADHD. Our patient is an 18 year­old female who was referred for evaluation of abnormal TFTs. She initially presented to her gynecologist for irregular menstrual cycles. Hormonal work up revealed a normal prolactin, negative pregnancy test, and a normal TSH with elevated free T4 and free T3 levels. A thyroid ultrasound was consistent with goiter. She was clinically euthyroid and had no signs of pituitary dysfunction. Family history was remarkable for hypothyroidism in her maternal aunts and ADHD in her brother. Upon evaluation in the endocrinology clinic, repeat TFTs were obtained which again showed normal TSH at 2.57 (0.50–4.30 MIU/L), elevated free T4 at 1.9 (0.9–1.4 ng/dl) and elevated free T3 at 5.3 (2.9–4.6 pg/ml). Total T4 and T3 levels were also obtained to rule out a protein binding effect, both of which were elevated at 17.2 (4.5–12 mcg/dL) and 201 (76–181 ng/dl), respectively. Autoimmune disease was ruled out with negative thyroid peroxidase antibodies and thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins. Central etiology was ruled out by the normal alpha subunit level at 0.2 (0.1–0.6 ng/ml). Given her family history, she was referred to and evaluated by the genetics department. An assessment of her family pedigree warranted genetic testing which showed a mutation in exon 9 of the THRB gene, with replacement of arginine by cysteine at position 320 (p.Arg320Cys), an autosomal dominant mutation. It is important to have a high clinical suspicion for RTH as an identifiable mutation can have implications not only for family members but also for the affected individual. DNA testing could save the affected individual multiple rounds of testing, unnecessary brain imaging and inappropriate treatment.

FIGURE 1.  Three­generational Pedigree Information about Downloading

View larger version (11K)

Poster 156 Disorders of Thyroid Function Monday & Tuesday Poster 9:00 AM ALTERATION IN THYROID FUNCTION IN A PATIENT ON PLASMAPHARESIS FOR MYASTHENIA GRAVIS M. Alhusseini Internal Medicine, Detroit Medical Center/Wayne State University, Dearborn, MI Plasmapharesis is a therapeutic procedure in which plasma components are extracted from the blood. Most thyroid hormone is bound to plasma proteins which are good candidates for removal by plasmapharesis. This procedure has been reported to cause alterations in thyroid hormone levels. We describe a patient with underlying hypothyroidism receiving plasmapharesis for myasthenia gravis who exhibited thyroid function abnormality. A 42 year old female with history of myasthenia gravis and hashimoto's thyroiditis diagnosed at the age of 27 (on levothyroxine 200 mcg daily) presented to the hospital with difficulty swallowing and underwent plasmapharesis for myasthenia gravis crisis. Review of systems and physical examination suggested euthyroidism. The endocrinology service was consulted because of low TT4 of 3.0 mcg/dL (6–14) and normal TSH of 4.6 microIU/mL (0.2–4.9). No FT4 was available initially; albumin was 3.8 mg/dL (3.3–4.3). In order to find out if the thyroid lab abnormality was

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

77/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

associated with her plasmapharesis, repeat thyroid function testing was done before and after the next plasmapharesis session. Before plasmapharesis, her TSH was 4.8 microIU/ml (0.2–4.9), FT4 1.2 ng/dL (0.8–1.8), FT3 2.7 pg/mL (1.4–4.4), TT4 8.3 mcg/dL (6–14), and TT3 72 ng/dL (60–180). Immediately post plasmapharesis, TSH was 3.6 microIU/ml (0.2–4.9), FT4 1.0 ng/dL (0.8–1.8), TT4 2.8 mcg/dL (6–14), and TT3 was 53 ng/dL (60–180). In this patient, plasmapharesis resulted in decreased TT4 and TT3 which is likely related to the removal of the binding proteins. Although in our patient the free Thyroxine levels were normal, plasmapharesis has been reported to decrease free thyroxine in patients with thyrotoxicosis. Plasmapharesis therapy can be associated with thyroid function abnormalities. Understanding the mechanisms by which plasmapharesis operates can help in the interpretation of these values.

Poster 157 Disorders of Thyroid Function Monday & Tuesday Poster 9:00 AM RADIOIODINE ABLATION­INDUCED GRAVES' DISEASE J. Furst, A.P. Kuker, S.A. Ebner Division of Endocrinology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY We describe the case of a patient with congestive heart failure and toxic multinodular goiter (TMNG) with subclinical hyperthyroidism who developed Graves'­like hyperthyroidism after I­131 ablation. A 67­year­old woman with CHF, T2D, HTN, and TMNG with low but detectable TSH (0.04–0.84, nl range 0.32– 4.05mIU/L) and normal fT4, TT4, TT3 from 2011 through 2014 had negative TPO, antithyroglobulin and TSI antibodies prior to ablation. Her thyroid US showed a 1.7×1.3×1.2cm solid, hypoechoic nodule in the right lobe and a 4.4×2.9×3.6cm complex, cystic nodule in the left lobe. 123I uptake and scan was notable for mild heterogeneous uptake, with overall uptake of 19.8%. Given subclinical hyperthyroidism with TSH10mU/l or after thyroidectomy or radioiodine ablation). L­T4 in subclinical HT is only partially reimbursed. The use of L­T4 was examined over 2008–2013 to study interregional variation and changes in the use of L­T4 in Finland. Data on the use of L­T4 (fully and partially reimbursed) were derived from the registry of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland (gender, age and hospital district distributions, years 2008–2013). The corresponding population statistics were derived from the Population Register Centre. In 2008, the prevalence of L­T4 use was 3.25% among females and 0.65% among males; in 2013 the figures were

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

88/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

4.31% and 0.96%. In 2008 the regional variation of the total prevalence among the hospital districts varied from 3.3% to 4.8% and in 2013 from 4.2% to 7.0%. This variation did not correlate with the size of the hospital district, its population or the prevalence six years previously. The highest prevalence of L­T4 use occurred in aged patients (≥75 years), among females 18% and males 8%. In 2013 the prevalence of fully reimbursed L­T4 use was 1.32 % among females (1.33 % in 2008) and 0.25% among males (0.24% in 2008). The prevalence of partially reimbursed L­T4 use in subclinical HT was 2.99% among females (1.93% in 2008) and 0.71% among males (0.42% in 2008). The incidence of L­T4 use in overt and subclinical HT were 5 and 241/100,000/yr, respectively, Discussion. The incidence and prevalence figures of overall L­T4 use are the same as in international surveys. The regional variations in Finland are of similar magnitude as in Sweden; this variation was stable over a six­year period. The results show also that the increase of L­T4 use over time is exclusively due to the treatment of subclinical HT. The results imply that a significant part of the increased use of thyroxine may be due to treatment of patients that do not have genuine hypothyreosis.

Poster 179 Disorders of Thyroid Function Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM IRON DEFICIENCY IS THE MAIN CAUSE OF SYMPTOM PERSISTENCE IN PATIENTS TREATED FOR HYPOTHYROIDISM E.T. Soppi Out Patient Clinic, Eira Hospital, Helsinki, Finland Symptoms of hypothyroidism (HT) persist in 5–10% of hypothyroid patients treated with levothyroxine (L­T4). These patients are a clinical challenge and are often difficult to treat or unresponsive to combination treatment with L­T4 and L­T3. The prevalence in the population of iron deficiency is as common as HT. Symptoms of iron deficiency (ID) are identical to the symptom spectrum of HT. However, diagnosing iron deficiency may be extremely challenging, since iron stores may be severely depleted without any changes in the blood hemoglobin concentration or red cell indices. Patients with ferritin concentrations up to 70 mg/l may, in fact, be severely iron deficient. Twenty five females with a history of overt HT were referred after appropriate and ongoing treatment with L­T4 for persisting hypothyroid symptoms. After careful clinical examination B12­vitamin deficiency, celiac disease, hypercalcemia and vitamin D deficiency were excluded. Their L­T4 dose was adjusted when necessary to achieve a TSH concentration of 1–2 mU/l. 4/5 and 14/20 of the patients with serum ferritin 0.05). 131I therapy is a safe and effective therapy method for women with Graves hyperthyroidism at reproductive age,they can have normal delivery and healthy baby as the population on condition that their thyroid function could be reasonably controlled and maintained by the proper therapy before and during pregnancy.

Poster 192 Iodine Uptake & Metabolism Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM IODINE CONTENT OF US ENTERAL AND PARENTERAL NUTRITION SOLUTIONS D. Willard, L. Young, X. He, L. Braverman, E. Pearce Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA Iodine deficiency may cause goiter and hypothyroidism. Patients on long­term enteral (EN) or parenteral (PN) nutrition may be at risk for micronutrient deficiencies. An Italian study revealed that adults receiving long­term total PN (TPN) had low urinary iodine concentrations, suggesting inadequate iodine intake, and some had subclinical hypothyroidism. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for iodine is 150μg/day in nonpregnant adults. Recommendations vary for iodine content of adult EN and PN formulas. We measured EN and PN solution iodine content to determine whether US patients on long­term artificial nutrition are at risk for iodine deficiency. Iodine content of 10 EN solutions from Nestle and Abbott Nutrition and 4 PN solutions from Central Admixture Pharmacy Services (CAPS) (a B Braun company) and Clinimix (a Baxter product) was measured spectrophotometrically and compared with labeled content. Measured and labeled EN iodine content were similar, range 131–176μg/L and 114­160μg/L respectively. Mean measured iodine content for EN solutions was 164±15μg/L (Table 1), or 39μg/237L serving. PN labels did not report any iodine content, but measurement revealed small amounts of iodine (13–40μg/L) in each solution. Patients on long­term total EN (TEN) would require on average 3.8 EN servings/day to meet iodine requirements. Typical fluid requirements are 30­40ml/kg/day for adults receiving either TEN or TPN, so adults on TEN likely consume enough servings to meet their daily iodine requirements. PN formulas were found to contain small, unlabeled, amounts of iodine. Patients on TPN would require on average 5.6L PN/day to meet the RDA of iodine. This volume of PN is far in excess of typical consumption. While patients on long­term TEN are likely to have adequate iodine intake, those on long­term TPN are vulnerable to iodine deficiency unless they are also ingesting iodine­rich foods or supplements. Studies are needed to investigate the iodine status of these patients, and to develop national standards for the iodine content of artificial nutrition solutions.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

95/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Poster 193 Iodine Uptake & Metabolism Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM PREVALENCE OF IODINE DEFICIENCY DISORDER IN HIGH RISK PREGNANT WOMEN L.S. Souza1,2, R.D. Campos1,2, V.D. Alves1, S.C. Rebouças1, R. Beck1, T.M. Xavier1, T.L. Oliveira1, C.M. Mendes3, C.A. Oliveira4, L.S. Gomes5, A.C. Feitosa6, H.E. Ramos1 1Biorregulation, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil 2Post­graduate Program in Interactive Processes of Organs and Systems, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil 3Biofunction, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil 4Health & Science Center, Federal University Reconcavo of Bahia, Santo Antonio de Jesus, Brazil 5Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil 6Bahiana School of Medicine, Salvador, Brazil

Despite progress in poverty reduction, children in northeast of Brazil are vulnerable to malnutrition. In 2013, the levels of salt iodization were reduced to 15–45 mg/Kg and the scarcity of new representative data is worry, mainly because most of the previous studies was based on subnational analysis.Objective: Assess the iodine nutritional status of HRPW in a reference center in Bahia, Brazil. Cross­sectional study conducted in a randomly selected 83 HRPW (16–44 years old). Questionnaire was designed to obtain socioeconomic, demographic and health information. Urinary iodine concentration (UIC) by Sandell­Kolthoff reaction, and anthropometric evaluation were performed. The mean age was 29.4±6.8 years old and median was 30 years old. 73.5%, 24.1% and 2.4% of HRPW were in the third, second and first trimester, respectively. The mean UIC was 204±8μg/L and median was 190μg/L (25th–75th percentile: 148–263 μg/L, with a range of 2–405 μg/L). Low UIC (20 U/ml) were present in more than half of the women. No associations were found between preterm delivery and thyroid dysfunction (adjusted OR 0.6, 95% CI: 0.1–2.3) or autoimmunity (adjusted OR 1.1, 95% CI: 0.4–2.7). After implementation of the Danish iodine fortification program, the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity in Danish pregnant women is high­even higher by use of pre­established reference ranges from International consensus guidelines. However, no associations were found with abnormal obstetric outcome. Large randomized controlled trials are needed to clarify the benefit of treating slight aberrations in pregnant women's thyroid function. The use of pre­established trimester­specific reference ranges from populations with a different iodine status will misclassify pregnant women's thyroid status and pose a risk to patient safety.

Poster 198 Thyroid & Development Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM INCREASED RISK OF STILLBIRTH IN WOMEN FIRST TIME DIAGNOSED AND TREATED FOR HYPOTHYROIDISM AFTER A PREGNANCY: COMPARISON WITH OTHER AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES IN A DANISH POPULATION­BASED STUDY S.L. Andersen1,2, J. Olsen3, P. Laurberg1,4 1Department of Endocrinology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark 3Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark

Stillbirth is in Denmark defined as the birth of a child with no signs of life in or after gestational week 22. We hypothesized that women first time diagnosed and treated for hypothyroidism in the two­year­period after a pregnancy had an increased risk of suffering from untreated thyroid dysfunction already during the pregnancy which could have attributed to the termination of pregnancy with stillbirth. We compared the risk of stillbirth in such women with women developing other autoimmune diseases in the two­year­period after a pregnancy: hyperthyroidism, diabetes mellitus (DM), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Population­based cohort study using Danish nationwide registers. All singleton pregnancies, 1997–2008, terminated with live birth (n=714,499) or stillbirth (n=2,653) were identified plus information on maternal hypo­ and hyperthyroidism (hospital diagnosis/drug prescription), DM, RA and IBD up to two years after the pregnancy. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate adjusted (e.g. age, smoking) hazard ratio (aHR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for stillbirth, reference: no hypo­ or hyperthyroidism/DM/RA/IBD (n=696,059). We identified 2,080 pregnancies where the mother was first time diagnosed and treated for hypothyroidism in the two­year period after the pregnancy under study and redeemed prescriptions of thyroid hormone for more than two years. In this group, 14 pregnancies (0.67%) had terminated with stillbirth which was significantly higher than in reference pregnancies (0.36%, p=0.017); aHR 1.94 (95% CI 1.12–3.34). Looking at other autoimmune diseases first time diagnosed and treated after the pregnancy under study; the risk that the pregnancy had terminated with stillbirth was similarly increased in hyperthyroidism (aHR 2.28 (95% CI 1.39–3.73)) and markedly increased in diabetes (9.13 (6.15–13.57)), but not in the non­endocrine disorders RA and IBD (1.08 (0.41–2.89)). An increased risk of stillbirth was observed when maternal hypothyroidism was first time diagnosed and treated after the termination of the pregnancy. Notably, a high risk was also observed for other endocrine diseases, but not for the autoimmune diseases of non­endocrine origin.

Poster 199 Thyroid & Development Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM COMPARISON OF HYPOTHYROIDISM AND HYPERTHYROIDISM INCIDENCES DURING PREGNANCY AND POSTPARTUM: A DANISH POPULATION­BASED STUDY S.L. Andersen1,2, A. Carlé1,3, J. Olsen4, P. Laurberg1,5 1Department of Endocrinology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

98/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark 3Department of Medicine, Silkeborg Hospital, Silkeborg, Denmark 4Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark 5Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark

Physiological changes in the maternal immune system during and after a pregnancy may influence the onset of autoimmune disease. An increased incidence of hyperthyroidism has been observed both in early pregnancy and postpartum, but it remains to be elucidated if the incidence of hypothyroidism varies in parallel in and around pregnancy. Population­based cohort study using Danish nationwide registers. All women who gave birth to singleton live­born children from 1999–2008 (n=403,958) were identified as well as information on hospital diagnosis of hypothyroidism and redeemed prescriptions of thyroid hormone. Incident hypothyroidism (age 15–45 years) in the period from 1997– 2010 was defined as a) no previous hospital diagnosis or treatment of thyroid disease, b) ≥2 redeemed prescriptions of thyroid hormone within a period of more than 2 years and c) no hospital diagnosis of congenital or iatrogenic hypothyroidism. The incidence rate (IR) of hypothyroidism was calculated in 3­month intervals before, during and after the woman's first pregnancy in the study period and compared with previously published IR of hyperthyroidism. Altogether 5,220 women (1.3%) were identified with onset of hypothyroidism from 1997–2010 with an overall IR of 92/100,000/year. A total of 1,572 women (0.4%) developed hypothyroidism in the period from 2 years before to 2 years after birth of the first child birth in the study period. The IR of hypothyroidism decreased during the pregnancy (incidence rate ratio (IRR) vs. the overall IR in the rest of the study period 1997–2010: first trimester: 0.89 (95% CI 0.66–1.19)), second trimester: 0.71 (0.52–0.97)), third trimester: 0.29 (0.19–0.45)), and increased after birth with the highest level 3–6 months postpartum (3.62 (2.85–4.60)). Compared with hyperthyroidism, no incidence peak was observed in early pregnancy (see Figure). On the other hand, the postpartum peak was of the same magnitude, but confined to one year after birth. These are the first population­based data on the incidence of hypothyroidism in and around pregnancy. The incidence declined during pregnancy followed by a sharp increase postpartum. Notably, hypothyroidism as opposed to hyperthyroidism showed no early pregnancy peak.

Relative frequencies of incident maternal hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. Information about Downloading

View larger version (20K)

Poster 200 Thyroid & Development Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM THYROID DISEASE BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER PREGNANCY IN RELATION TO REGIONAL DIFFERENCE IN IODINE INTAKE: A STUDY WITHIN THE DANISH NATIONAL BIRTH COHORT S.L. Andersen1,2, J. Olsen3, P. Laurberg1,4 1Department of Endocrinology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark 3Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark

Thyroid disease is common in women of reproductive age, but the exact burden of disease before, during and after a pregnancy is not clear. We describe the frequency of thyroid disease in pregnant women enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) in relation to the Danish regional difference in iodine intake. Population­based study within the DNBC which included 101,032 pregnancies, 1997–2003. We studied women enrolled in DNBC who gave birth to a live­born child. Information on maternal thyroid disease (hyper­, hypothyroidism, goiter/nodules, other) before, during and up to 5 years after the woman's first pregnancy in the cohort was obtained from self­report by interview (median gestational week 17) and from nationwide registers on hospital diagnosis/surgery (from 1977) and prescriptions of thyroid drugs (from 1995). Among 77,671 mothers included; 3,018 (3.9%) were identified with onset of thyroid disease before (2.0%): hyper­ (n=627), hypothyroidism (n=371), goiter/nodules (n=495), other (n=30); during (0.1%): hyper­ (n=44), hypothyroidism (n=30), goiter/nodules (n=10); or in the 5­year period after the pregnancy (1.8%): hyper­ (n=551), hypothyroidism (n=538), goiter/nodules (n=303), other (n=19). During the pregnancy, 153 (0.2%) women received ATD, whereas 324 women received treatment for hyperthyroidism before the pregnancy alone and 90 women were treated before and after, but not in the pregnancy. Altogether 365 (0.5%) received L­T4 for hypothyroidism in the pregnancy: 83 had hypothyroidism after previous hyperthyroidism, 42 after previous surgery for goiter/nodules, and 240 had no previous hyperthyroidism or surgery. Overall, non­surgical hypothyroidism was more common in East Denmark with mild iodine deficiency (ID): 1.44% vs. 1.11% in West with moderate ID (p20 mIU/L in newborns older than 48 hours who are not underweight or ill. Newborn TSH is routinely measured by immunoassay of a dried blood spot (DBS) eluate. DBS performance testing samples use a hematocrit of 55%. Hematocrit is known to alter the quantitative recovery of serum analytes and affect the predictive value of diagnosing metabolic disease from a DBS, but the effect of hematocrit on the measurement of dried blood spot TSH is not known. We studied the effect of hematocrit in the range found in neonates on the quantitative recovery of TSH from a DBS. Aliquots of plasma or serum with TSH concentrations 6.3±0.4, and 26.6±8.0 mIU/L were added to packed red blood cells to obtain blood samples with hematocrits of 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, and 65%. 100 microliters from each hematocrit were deposited on newborn screening filter paper, dried at room temperature overnight, and stored at 4o C. TSH was measured by ELISA in the eluate of 4 replicate DBS punches at each hematocrit. Data were analyzed using a linear mixed effects model. Hematocrit had a significant (p5 years in a 65 year­old without comorbidities and low­risk DTC. Only specialty (endocrinology p 0.005) was significant in a 65 year­old with comorbidities and high­risk DTC. Factors influencing decision­making regarding TSH suppression therapy included cardiac arrhythmias (87.4%), patient symptoms (74.8%), heart disease (71.5%), osteoporosis (66.8%) and age (49.1%). Despite current guidelines to maintain TSH in the low normal range in patients with low­risk DTC, up to 40% of physicians maintain TSH suppression for>5 years even in older patients who are at increased risk for cardiac arrhythmias and osteoporosis. Interestingly, endocrinologists are most likely to suppress TSH for >5 years both in low­risk patients and in patients with comorbidities. More physician education and future research to determine patient­level factors involved in decision­making are needed.

Poster 269 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM MANAGEMENT OF THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE (TSH) AND POSSIBLE IMPACT ON OUTCOMES FOR

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

132/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

PATIENTS WITH RADIOACTIVE IODINE­REFRACTORY DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER (RAI­RDTC) RECEIVING SORAFENIB OR PLACEBO ON THE PHASE III DECISION TRIAL. J.W. Smit1, M. Schlumberger2, C. Kappeler3, G. Meinhardt4, M.S. Brose5 1Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands 2Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France 3Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany 4Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Whippany, NJ 5Department of Otorhinolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery, Abramson Cancer Center of the University of

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA TSH suppression with levothyroxine is standard of care for management of patients with thyroid cancer post­ thyroidectomy. One third of RAI­rDTC patients randomized to receive sorafenib in the phase III DECISION trial had increased serum TSH values (Brose et al., Lancet 384:319, 2014). Here we examined the management of TSH for patients from the DECISION trial and conducted an exploratory post­hoc analysis to determine whether progression­ free survival (PFS) was impacted based on successful TSH management. A total of 417 patients were randomized to receive placebo (n=210) or sorafenib (n=207). Serum TSH and thyroxin levels were assessed every 28­day cycle and levothyroxine dosing adjusted for TSH values>0.5 mU/L so as to maintain a desired level0.5 mU/L at any cycle were reported in 69 (33.3%) and 28 (13.4%) of patients in the sorafenib and placebo arms, respectively. Most new occurrences of elevated TSH in the sorafenib arm were reported in cycle 2 (11.4% of evaluable patients), at which time mean TSH values were 0.37±1.20 mU/L compared to 0.18±1.07 mU/L in the placebo arm. Successful control of TSH (defined as>75% of TSH values1cm, for which the natural history of untreated disease remains unknown. Such data may modify the approach to patients with clinically relevant PTC. We retrospectively analyzed all patients with histologically proven PTC diagnosed at BWH between 1995–2011 identifying patients whose cancer was not surgically resected for ≥6 months (usually due to treatment of a separate illness or lack of patient follow up). Tumor growth of ≥3mm (considered a consistently reproducible difference in nodule measurement), recurrences, and disease­specific mortality were assessed.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

133/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

From the 827 patients diagnosed with PTC during this time, 92 patients (100 malignant nodules) experienced a delay in initial surgical treatment. The median delay was 2.0 yrs, ranging from 6 months to13.8 years (yrs). Cancers were low­risk, staged as T1/T2 and Nx/N0, in 78 of 92 cases (85%). During observation, US confirmed growth≥3mm in 39 of 100 malignancies (39%). This was notably less frequent for 1–2cm PTC (11/45, 24%) compared to PTC>2cm (28/55, 51%) (p=.007), though no new pathologic lymphadenopathy was identified. Following ultimate surgical resection and radioiodine ablation, PTC recurred in 5 of 92 (5.4%) patients. In each of these cases, initial tumor size was >2cm. Importantly, no disease­specific mortality was confirmed over median follow up of 7.0 yrs (max=18 yrs). Untreated low­risk (T1/T2, Nx/N0) PTC exhibits an indolent course, without new lymph node disease and having low recurrence risk, after a median 2­year delay in operative treatment. Nonetheless, cancer growth and recurrence is more likely when PTC is larger than 2cm. While these data cannot confirm the safety of an observational, non­ operative approach for all PTC, they provide strong pilot data supporting further investigation of conservative management of low­risk PTC measuring 2cm or smaller.

Poster 271 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM IN LOW RISK DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER PATIENTS TREATED WITH TOTAL THYROIDECTOMY AND RADIOACTIVE IODINE, SUPPRESSED AND STIMULATED THYROGLOBULIN HAVE SIMILAR NEGATIVE PREDICTIVE VALUE TO DETECT RECURRENT/PERSISTENT DISEASE J.M. Dominguez, F. Nilo, T. Contreras, R. Carmona, V. Iturrieta Department of Endocrinology, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile The follow­up of patients with low risk differentiated thyroid cancer (LRDTC) treated with total thyroidectomy (TT) and radioactive iodine (RAI) requires serial neck ultrasound (US) and serum thyroglobulin (Tg). The need to stimulate Tg is controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the negative predictive value (NPV) of suppressed and stimulated Tg to detect persistence/recurrence in LRDTC patients treated with TT and RAI. This retrospective study included adult LRDTC patients, followed for a median of 3.7 years (range 2.0–5.7) after TT and RAI, who received TSH suppressive therapy and had negative Tg antibodies. Clinical data obtained during follow­ up were used to detect structural (locoregional or distant metastases) and biochemical (suppressed Tg≥1 ng/mL or stimulated Tg≥2 ng/mL, in the absence of structural disease) persistence or recurrence of DTC. Among those patients in whom persistence/recurrence was not diagnosed with neck US, we calculated the NPV of suppressed and stimulated Tg to detect structural disease. We included 148 patients, 129 (87.2%) women, age 45.3±13.4 years old. Persistence or recurrence was found in 8 (5.4%) patients: 5 structural (neck lymph nodes, found on US) and 3 biochemical (1 had suppressed Tg≥1ng/dl and 2 had stimulated Tg≥2ng/dl), so stimulated Tg was useful to detect disease in 2 patients. Among patients in whom persistence/recurrence was not detected on neck US or basal Tg≥1ng/dl (n=142), Tg was stimulated in 75 (52.8%) and was not in 67(47.2%). There were no differences regarding gender, age, length of follow­up or AJCC stages between both groups. Two out of 75 (2.7%) and none of 67 (0%) patients with stimulated and basal Tg had recurrence/persistence, respectively (p=0.17). Both stimulated and suppressed Tg had NPV of 100% to detect persistence/recurrence (Table). The 2 patients who had persistence/recurrence had biochemical disease and are currently alive. From the whole group, 1 patient who had no disease died because of multiple myeloma and the rest are alive. In LRDTC patients treated with TT and RAI, suppressed and stimulated Tg have high and similar NPV to diagnose persistence/recurrence, so there is no need to stimulate Tg during follow­up.

Poster 272 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM EVALUATION OF THE AFIRMA GENE EXPRESSION CLASSIFIER ON REPEAT FNA OF INDETERMINATE THYROID NODULES G.P. Harrison1, J. Sosa2, X. Jiang1 1Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 2Endocrine Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC

The Afirma gene expression classifier (GEC) is a test that was developed to aid in management of indeterminate thyroid nodules (ITN) by fine needle aspiration (FNA). At our institution, Afirma testing is not performed on the first indeterminate result; rather, we utilize the GEC among patients with two consecutive indeterminate diagnoses in the same thyroid nodule. We reviewed results of thyroid nodules evaluated by Afirma GEC at our institution from August 2013 to March 2015. Results of cytopathology and the GEC were collected, as well as diagnoses from surgical resection when performed. 115 thyroid nodules were evaluated by the Afirma GEC. The FNA diagnostic categories for these nodules were: 100

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

134/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

(87%) Bethesda III, 10 (9%) Bethesda IV, 3 (2%) Bethesda I, 1 (1%) Bethesda V, and 1 (1%) non­diagnostic. Afirma GEC results for 45% of the nodules were “benign,” 50% were “suspicious,” and 6 specimens yielded no result due to low mRNA content. 6% of the benign nodules were treated surgically, all of which were benign on final surgical pathology. 77% of the suspicious nodules were treated surgically; final surgical pathology diagnoses for 61% were benign and 39% malignant, yielding a positive predictive value (PPV) of 39%. The majority of the malignancies (71%) were follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma, 18% were Hurthle cell carcinomas, and 6% were classic variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Benign diagnoses included follicular adenoma (35%), nodular hyperplasia (38%), and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (23%). This is the largest single institutional study of Afirma GEC utilization to date, and unique in that Afirma was performed only for repeat­indeterminate nodules. In our experience in this context, half of the ITN were classified as “suspicious” by Afirma, with a 39% rate of malignancy in these nodules at surgical resection, in comparison with a historical rate of malignancy at our institution of 8% for Bethesda III nodules and 23% for Bethesda IV. Our use of the GEC is consistent with prior reports that it has a low PPV in ITNs. In our experience, it was uncommon for GEC “benign” nodules to go to resection, and all of these nodules were benign on final pathology.

Poster 273 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM REGIONAL VARIATION IN RADIOIODINE ADMINISTRATION FOR THYROID REMNANT ABLATION IN WELL DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER ACROSS CANADIAN CENTERS OVER 2000–2010 I. Rachinsky3, M. Rajaraman4,5, W.D. Leslie7, A. Zahedi12, C. Jefford9, A. Pathak1,2, A. Boucher8, J. Young13, B. Lesperance11, M. Badreddine3,6, S. Nixey6, H. Fong5, S. Van Uum10 1Surgery, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada 2College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada 3Nuclear Medicine, Western University, London, ON, Canada 4Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada 5QEII Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada 6London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada 7University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada 8Professor, department of medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada 9Memorial University, St. John's, NF, Canada 10Medicine, Western University, London, ON, Canada 11Medicine, McGill Centre for Translational Research in Cancer, Montreal, QC, Canada 12Women's College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada 13Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada

Initial treatment with radioactive iodine (RAI) has been reported to vary significantly between studies. We explored variation in RAI treatment patterns between five thyroid cancer treatment centers in Canada. The Canadian Thyroid Cancer Consortium (CAN­TC) is a collaborative registry to describe patterns of care for thyroid cancer; currently nine centers participate. Here we present interim data from 5 centers (London, ON; Toronto, ON; Halifax, NS; Winnipeg, MB; and St. John's, NL) on RAI ablation in patients diagnosed with well­differentiated (papillary and follicular) thyroid cancer between 2000 and 2010. We compared RAI ablation protocols including indications (based on TNM staging), and doses administered. We excluded patients with known distant metastasis at time of RAI ablation. We included 2526 patients, varying from 100 to 1192 per center. There were no significant differences in TNM stage over time, with the following overall (range between centers) distribution: T1 45% (39–48), T2 28% (24–34), T3 24% (18–30) and T4 3% (0–7). RAI use increased in earlier years and then declined (Figure). During 2005–2010, the fraction of patients receiving RAI decreased from 74% to 31% for T1, and from 92 to 59% for T2, and from 92 to 70% for T3 (P0.5cm were also correlated to lymph node metastasis significantly except capsule invasion. In multivariate analysis, comparing to Group A, older patients had less lymph node metastasis (OR 0.398, 95%CI 0.304–0.520, P40mm were associated with CD. On the adjusted model of logistic regression, only tumor's size (p=.02) and angioinvasion (p=.01) remained significant. In sum, angioinvasion and tumor's size portend a worse clinical outcome. Dissociation between the WBS and conventional imaging exams favors the hypothesis of a lower avidity for iodine.

Poster 318 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM FOLLOW­UP TIME NEEDED FOR TGAB+DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER (DTC) PATIENTS TO CONVERT TO TGAB­NEGATIVITY FOLLOWING SUCCESSFUL SURGERY RELATES TO INITIAL TGAB CONCENTRATION AND NOT RADIOIODINE (RAI) REMNANT ABLATION C. Spencer1, S. Fatemi2, C. Nguyen1, J. LoPresti1, I. Petrovic1 1Medicine, University Southern California, Pasadena, CA 2Endocrinology`, Kaiser Permanente, Panorama City, CA

Thyroglobulin autoantibodies (TgAb), present in ∼25% of DTC patients, interfere with Tg immunometric assay (IMA) measurements compromising serum Tg follow­up monitoring. Post­thyroidectomy(Tx) TgAb trends reflect changes in Tg­secreting tissue (normal remnant/tumor)*. Patients rendered disease­free by surgery typically display a declining TgAb trend, often becoming TgAb­negative**. How baseline TgAb and/or RAI remnant ablation influence TgAb­ positive to TgAb­negative conversion time is unclear. This study evaluated relationships between baseline [0–3 month post­Tx] TgAb and post­operative TgAb trends [falling (≥50%), stable, or rising (≥50%)], and whether RAI influences the postoperative time needed to render TgAb undetectable in response to successful surgery. Chart review selected 1333/1554 DTC patients with ≥2 years post­operative follow­up monitoring with non­elevated TSH, who displayed TgAb­positivity on one or more occasions (Kronus>0.4 kIU/L). Patients were grouped according to baseline TgAb concentration: very low (VL=0.5­0.9, n=225), low (L=1.0­9.9, n=708), medium (M=10­99, n=287) or high (H=≥ 100, n=113) kIU/L and history of RAI administration. TgAb fell in 76%, remained stable in 13% and rose in 11%. Most patients had low baseline TgAb: 17, 53, 22 and 9% for VL, L, M and H groups, respectively. Conversion from TgAb­positivity to TgAb­negativity was more likely the lower the baseline TgAb concentration: 63, 34, 21 versus 3% for VL, L, M versus H groups, respectively. Postoperative follow­up time needed for TgAb to become undetectable (in addition to serum Tg100 IU/l) were found in 64/72 cases suspicion to malignancy (mean±SD serum TSH concentration ­ 2,6±0,7  mU/L). Ultrasound screening during 25–29 yrs. after the Chernobyl accident still showes a high prevalence of nodular thyroid disease (19%) and cancer (0,29%) in high­risk groups of exposed population of south­western part of Belarus.

Poster 358 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM THE PREVALENCE, CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES AND SURGICAL OUTCOMES ACCORDING TO THE EXTENT OF THYROIDECTOMY IN DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER SIZED>1CM AND1cm and 1cm and 1cm and 1cm and 5mm PTM patients who are diagnosed before surgery because of the high lymph node metastases and extra­thyroid extension.

Poster 361

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

179/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM WORLDWIDE VARIABILITY OF ACCESS TO MKIS FOR REFRACTORY, METASTATIC THYROID CANCER S.R. Perea1,2, N. Armstrong15, B. Bartès6, M.S. Brose9, R. Elisai11, K. Farnell4, J. Grey7, C. Harmer13, H. Hobrough5, M. Luster14, U. Mallick15, M. McGarry12, L. Moss16, F. Palazzo17, M. Porrey8, F. Pitoia18, M. Schlumberger10, J. Taylor1,19, C. Villar1,3 1Thyroid Cancer Alliance, Diss, United Kingdom 2ACTIRA, Buenos Aires, Argentina 3AECAT, Madrid, Spain 4Butterfly Thyroid Cancer Trust, Newcastle, United Kingdom 5Thyroid Cancer Support Group Wales, Cardiff, United Kingdom 6Vivre sans Thyroide, Paris, France 7Association for Multiple Endocrine Neoplasm Disorders, Tunbridge Wells, United Kingdom 8Schildklier Organisaties Nederland (SON), Amersfoort, Netherlands 9Otorhinolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 10Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer (CLCC) de Villejuif, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France 11University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy 12Thyroid Cancer Support Group Ireland, Dublin, Ireland 13Retired, London, United Kingdom 14University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany 15Freeman Hospital, Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom 16Velindre Cancer Centre, Cardiff, United Kingdom 17Hammersmith Hospital & Imperial College, London, United Kingdom 18Hospital de Clínicas ­ University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina 19British Thyroid Foundation, Harrogate, United Kingdom

Advanced thyroid cancer is a rare condition with a poor prognosis. Multikinase inhibitors (MKIs) have some benefits for patients with advanced progressive metastatic and/or symptomatic radioiodine resistant differentiated thyroid cancer (RR­DTC) or advanced medullary thyroid cancer (A­MTC) but patients and physicians report difficulties accessing them. To compare access data to MKIs (mainly sorafenib, vandetanib and cabozantinib), physicians and patient advocates were asked to complete a questionnaire about the availability of MKIs in their country for treating RR­DTC and A­MTC. Data were collected for Argentina, England, France, Germany, Italy, Ireland, the Netherlands, Scotland, Spain, the USA and Wales. All 3 drugs have received FDA and EMA approval for RR­DTC and/or A­MTC and others are in development. However, approval is subject to national and regional regulatory agencies and processes, resulting in great international variability in MKIs access. See Table 1. These data represent a snapshot of the present availability of MKIs to advanced thyroid cancer patients and highlight inconsistent results in adjoining countries and regions. Although it would be optimal to inventarise availability of MKIs by analysing official health regulatory sources, these preliminary results may increase awareness of the issues and assist patient organisations, doctors, regulatory authorities and the pharmaceutical industry to work together to improve access.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

180/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Poster 362 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM ADHERENCE TO LOW IODINE DIET AND ABLATION SUCCESS RATE IN PATIENTS OPERATED FROM WELL DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CARCINOMAS V. Marković1, B. Penić1, A. Punda1, D. Eterović1, A. Pranić Kragić1, Z. Antunović2 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Split and University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia 2Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Split, Split, Croatia

To investigate the adherence to two­week strict low iodine diet regime and the success of ablation in patients operated from T1­2N0M0 well differentiated thyroid cancers. This retrospective study was conducted using questionnaire forms and medical records in 135 patients (107 female, 28 male; median age 54 (range, 19–79 years)) operated and ablated with 1,1 GBq of I­131 over period 2012–2014. Thirty four patients were on regular diet (group 1), 30 patients were only adviced to hold the low iodine diet (group 2) and 71 patients were given written instructions (group 3, strict regime). Adherence to strict diet regime was poor (53% at the first and 64% at the control hospitalization). The reablation rates were similar: 32%, 27% and 30% for the groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (P=0,313). Patients who had reablation had significantly greater preablative Tg concentration compared to patients successfully ablated with single dose (3,0±3,5 vs. 1,8±2,5 ng/ml), regardless of diet type (multivariate relative risk of reablation for patients having Tg over 3 ng/ml; 1.92±0.45 (95% confidence interval)). We did not demonstrate the effect of diet on the outcome of radioiodine ablation, which could in part be due to low adherence. Therefore we advise reminding the patients on starting of two­week low iodine diet by telephone call/SMS. Next, we propose increasing the ablative activity in patients with preablative thyroid remnant Tg concentrations greater than 3,0 ng/ml.

Poster 363 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster 9:00 AM DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF PARATHYROID CARCINOMA (SEVEN CASES REPORT AND LITERATURE REVIEW) W. Liu Shanghai Tongren Hospital, Shanghai, China Parathyroid carcinoma (PC) is a rare endocrine malignancy, accounting for less than 1% of cases of primary hyperparathyroidism.It was first described by De Quervain in 1904, but there have since been fewer than 1000 cases of this pathology described in the English literature. The clinical manifestations, treatment and prognosis of 7 cases of PC are summarized in our hospital. And discuss the method of diagnosis and treatment of the disease. The overall survival at 5­year and 10­year was 85%­100% and 49–80% in reports.Despite the high survival rate, close to 50% of the rate of recurrences were observed. From January 2005 to December 2014, a total of 7 patients were recruited. Their clinical data, clinical manifestation, examinations and surgical modes were analyzed retrospectively. One patient died after operation beause of severe hypocalcemia.The remaining six patients were followed up for 16– 72 months, an average of 37±20.03 months. Two patients underwent En bloc resection and one patients underwent parathyroidectomy were followed up until now without recurrence or metastasis.Three patients underwent parathyroidectomy appeared metastasis or recurrence in the follow­up. En bloc resection in initial operation can reduce recurrence and metastasis rate. Aggressive treatment should be considered in initial operation.It can improve the cure rate.

Poster 364 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM RESILIENCE OF THE RECURRENT LARYNGEAL NERVE IN THYROID SURGERY: A CASE REPORT K. Sundaram 1Otolaryngology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Staten Island, NY 2Surgery, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, NY

The Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve (RLN) in the rat model is very resilient to crush injuries. Even with severe crush injuries most rat RLNs recover in 42 weeks. The axon profiles were similar in cross section to an adult normal nerve (Tessema et al). This has been observed in our lab as well ( Harris et al. poster at AHNS Translational meeting 2015). Sectioning the RLN in the rat is a definitive way to cause permanent vocal fold paralysis (VFP). It is known that in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer (ATC), upto 30% of patients could have VFP at the time of initial presentation ( Patel and Shaha). In the remaining cases preservation of the RLN could be aided by use of nerve monitoring and magnification. We present a case of an 89 year old female with a massive goiter, measuring about 12cms in diameter extending from the mandible to the upper chest. Two fine needle aspiration biopsies at other institutions were inconclusive. The patient could not move her neck due to the compressive effect of the mass, consequently affecting her quality of life.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

181/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

There was rapid growth of the mass over the previous 3 months. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy examination revealed mobile vocal folds bilaterally. Using nerve monitoring with an EMG endotracheal tube inserted fiberoptically, the thyroid mass comprising the right lobe and isthmus was resected. The RLN was identified, preserved and stimulated at the end of the procedure. The left lobe was normal in appearance. The final pathological diagnosis was ATC. Repeat fiberoptic laryngoscopy showed normal vocal fold mobility. The patient was offered post­operative chemo­radiation but she and her family declined further treatment. The patient was discharged to a nursing facility. If we extrapolate our findings in the rat model to patients, sectioning of the motor fibres of the RLN is necessary to produce permanent VFP. Identification and preservation of the motor fibres of the RLN during thyroidectomy will result in return of vocal fold motion. RLN monitoring and magnification to preserve the motor fibres of the RLN will aid in improved outcomes after thyroidectomy in ATC.

Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma involving neck and upper mediastinum. Information about Downloading

View larger version (121K)

Poster 365 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Basic 9:00 AM IN VITRO DETECTION OF AROMATIC COMPOUNDS BY SCENT­TRAINED CANINES TO DISCRIMINATE BETWEEN PAPILLARY THYROID CANCER AND BENIGN THYROID DISEASE IN HUMAN PATIENTS A.M. Hinson1,2, L. Jolly3, A.A. Ferrando4, B.C. Stack1,2, B.M. Wilkerson4, S. Waggoner4, D.L. Bodenner4,2, A.T. Franco3,2 1Otolaryngology­Head & Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 2UAMS Thyroid Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 3Physiology and Biophysics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 4Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR

The objective of the present study was to determine whether the aromatic compounds that allow scent­trained canines to reliably discriminate between PTC and benign thyroid disease could be duplicated in vitro. We also evaluated the tumor cell number threshold that a scent­trained dog could reliably detect within a mixture of PTC and benign thyroid cells. Thyroid tissue was collected during surgery from four patients with PTC (conventional type) and two patients with benign thyroid disease. Cell lines were cultured in DMEM­High Glucose supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 1% penicillin/ streptomycin, and 2mM L­Glutamine. Serial cell dilutions (range 100,000 cells to 10 cells) were prepared in PBS for each cell line. Conditioned culture medium, without FBS, from over­confluent cell lines was also tested. A gloved handler, blinded to the sample status, presented each sample in a conical tube to the canine in a randomized fashion. The handler verbally communicated the canine's alert to a blinded study coordinator who recorded the response. When presented with −100 to 1000 cells from PTC cell lines (suspended in 3 cc PBS), the canine indicated the presence of PTC in 16 of 16 cases (100% accuracy). When presented with less than 50 cells, the canine's alert was correct in only 4 of 10 cases (40% accuracy). By contrast, the canine did not alert on any benign sample presented at any cell concentration between 1,000 and 10,000 cells (3 of 3; 100% accuracy). To determine if the canines were detecting secreted factors from the tumor cells, we presented the canines with conditioned media from the cell lines. The canines gave a positive alert of PTC with 100% accuracy (4 of 4 cases) with the conditioned media samples isolated from the PTC cell lines, but did not alert on conditioned media collected from benign cells, or control media. Canines alert on secreted volatiles associated with PTC. PTC cells produce volatile organic compounds that can be detected in vitro by scent­trained canines in a dose dependent manner. Efforts are underway to classify the components underlying the aromatic profile associated with PTC.

Poster 366 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster 9:00 AM THYROTOXICOSIS FROM THYROID CANCER METASTASIS A. Mustafa, A. Manni, A. Pichardo­Lowden Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Hershey, PA Thyrotoxicosis due to functioning metastasis from thyroid cancer is rare. We report a case with hyper functioning pulmonary and bone metastasis characterized by rapid onset of thyrotoxicosis and long term survival following radioactive iodine administration. A 71 year old male, who underwent a total thyroidectomy for follicular variant papillary thyroid cancer which was already metastatic to the lungs & thoracic spine at presentation. He was euthyroid with a normal TSH of 0.5uIU/ml (0.3­5.1) & a Free T4 of 0.8ng/dl (0.7­1.48). Three months post­operatively he was found to be thyrotoxic

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

182/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

(TSHT (pA88S) were found in six PTC. Five had BRAF V600E mutation and one had ETV6­NTRK3 rearrangement as a driver mutation. LGALS­3 mRNA expression is higher in SNV group than non­ SNV group (203.39 versus 121.63, p=0.123). In SNV group, up­regulated genes included FCGR2A, CD80, CTLA4, LGALS1, LGALS9, GZMB, CD40, FAS, C1GALT1C1, BARD1, BAX and PRF1 whereas down­regulated genes included LAMP1, CYHR1, PAXIP1, CSNK2A2, SS18L1, APP, BRAF, GOLGA2, MAP1LC3A, CUBN, TG and TPO. In the linear regression analysis, beta coefficient between LGALS­3 gene expression and other galectin family gene expressions ­ LGALS­1, LGALS­2, LGALS­7, LGALS­8 and LGALS­12 ­ were higher in SNV group. Furthermore, RAS family gene expressions ­ KRAS, NRAS and HRAS ­ also have higher beta coefficient with LGALS­3 expression in SNV group. BRAF gene expression had negative correlation with LGALS­3. LGALS­3 pA88S SNV was associated with over­expression of other galectins. Increased galectins result in stronger aggregation of transmembrane galectin receptors and enhances intracellular signaling to oncogenic RAS. This SNV may be correlated with high PTC incidence in Korea. Further experimental validation and demographic investigation need to be performed to support this results.

Location of novel SNV, using Ensemble genome browser. View larger version (20K)

Information about Downloading

Poster 384 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Translational 9:00 AM COPY NUMBER VARIATION RELATED TO MTC PROGRESSION IN A PATIENT WITH MEN 2 AND P.G533C RET MUTATION A.N. Araujo1, D.R. Mazzotti3, R.M. Maciel2, J.M. Cerutti1 1Morphology and Genetics, UNIFESP, São José dos Campos, Brazil 2Medicine, UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil 3Psychobiology, UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil

Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) can occur as part of the autosomal dominant hereditary syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2). Most cases of MEN 2 syndromes arise from germline mutations in the RET gene. The pathogenesis of MTC suggests that, at least in hereditary cases, RET point mutations causes C­cell hyperplasia (CCH), creating a favorable environment for the development of MTC, and other genetic alterations might be involved in tumor progression. Thus, identifying genetic events associated with MTC progression is critical. Studies have identified associations between DNA copy number variation (CNV) and various diseases, including complex diseases

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

190/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

such as cancer. Advances in the study of CNVs make clear the need to assess the contribution that these changes may have on the development of complex diseases. Recently, our group identified CNVs associated with a higher predisposition to lymph node metastasis in a family with p.G533C RET mutation. In this study we aim to investigate whether somatic CNVs may be related to the genesis of MTC in this family with p.G533C RET mutation. To identify the possible candidate regions associated with genesis of MTC both the MTC DNA (case) and peripheral blood (control) were obtained from the index case with MTC and p.G533C RET germline mutation. Case and Control DNA were investigated using the Affymetrix Genome­Wide SNP Array 6.0 platform. The data were analyzed using PennCNV software and the genes present on identified autosomal CNVs were analyzed at Enrichr software, a gene list enrichment analysis tool, to better understand the functional relevance of these genes. We identified 41 CNVs specific to the case (32 losses and 9 gains). Twenty­one of these CNV regions encompass a total of 48 genes. Importantly, upon gene evaluation, we found overrepresented Pathways terms associated to galactose metabolism (P=0.043), type I diabetes mellitus (P=0.058) and prostate cancer (P=0.109). The use of paired samples allows indentifying somatic changes that may be associated with tumor progression. However, further analyses are still needed to determine the role of these CNVs in the etiological basis of the MTC in this family with MEN 2 and RET germline mutation.

Poster 385 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Translational 9:00 AM BRAF AND RAS MUTATION PATTERNS IN FOLLICULAR VARIANT OF PAPILLARY THYROID CANCER AND ITS CORRELATION WITH HISTOLOGIC SUB­TYPES A. AGARWAL1, N. George1, N. Kumari4, S. Gupta3, S. Agarwal2, S. Muthuswamy2, P. Singh5, N. Krishnani4 1Endocrine Surgery, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India 2genetics, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India 3Endocrinology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India 4Pathology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India 5anaesthsia, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India

The molecular profile of follicular variant of Papillary thyroid cancer (FVPTC) has been shown to be close to the follicular adenoma/ carcinoma group. However, there are very few studies describing the mutation patterns according to the encapsulated and infiltrative forms of follicular variant. Tissue from paraffin blocks of cancerous tissue (encapsulated and infiltrative cell subtypes of follicular variant of PTC (n=24) were marked and cut out. The core or shavings were processed for DNA isolation by Qiagen FFP tissue kit. BRAF V600E mutation was analyzed by RFLP PCR method. RAS mutations (KRAS and HRAS) were analyzed by sequencing (ABI 3100). Though there was no difference in age, gender and tumor size, infiltrative carcinomas has a much higher frequency of extrathyroidal extension(16.6% vs4.1%) and nodal metastases (37.5 vs 4.1%) than encapsulated tumors. BRAF mutation 1799T>A was found in none of the encapsulated tumor but in 6 of 24 (25%) infiltrative tumors. HRAS mutations were identified in 2/24(8.33%), but no mutations were identified in the KRAS gene. Both the HRAS mutations are present in the encapsulated papillary thyroid carcinoma follicular variant (2/7; 28.57%).BRAF positivity in classical PTC (n=60) was 76.6% while no KRas mutation was detected in classical PTC. Molecular signature of Follicular variant of Papillary Thyroid cancer is different from the conventional PTC. Even within the histologic sub­type of FVPTC, encapsulated sub­type has a molecular profile close to the follicular adenoma/carcinoma (absence of BRAF mutation and presence of Ras mutation).

Poster 386 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Translational 9:00 AM LOXO­101, A SELECTIVE PAN­TRK INHIBITOR FOR PATIENTS WITH TRK­ALTERATIONS M.S. Brose1, T.M. Bauer2, H.A. Burris2, R.C. Doebele3, A.F. Farago4, A.T. Shaw4, B.B. Tuch5, M.C. Cox5, D.S. Hong6 1University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 2Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, TN 3University of Colorado, Aurora, CO 4Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 5Loxo Oncology, South San Francisco, CA 6M.D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

The TRK family of neurotrophin receptors, TRKA, TRKB, and TRKC (encoded by NTRK1, NTRK2, and NTRK3, respectively), and their neurotrophin ligands regulate growth, differentiation and survival of neurons. Gene rearrangements resulting in mis­expression of fusion products that include the TRK kinase domain have been observed in diverse tumor types and may contribute to tumorigenesis (Vaishnavi, Cancer Discov 5:25, 2015). NTRK1 and NTRK3 fusions with various partner genes have been described in 2­3% of papillary thyroid carcinomas and are mutually exclusive of other known oncogenic mutations (TCGA, 2014 and data on file). LOXO­101 is an orally bioavailable, potent, ATP­competitive inhibitor of TRKA, TRKB, and TRKC. LOXO­101 has IC50 values in the low nanomolar range for inhibition of all three TRK family members in binding and cellular assays, with 100x selectivity over other kinases, and has shown acceptable pharmaceutical properties and safety in preclinical models. We are performing a Phase 1, multicenter, open­label, 3+3 dose­escalation study of LOXO­101 to assess safety and tolerability.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

191/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Data from 15 patients evaluated across 3 dose cohorts were reviewed. LOXO­101 was generally well tolerated with the most common adverse events being Grade 1 and 2 fatigue, dizziness and anemia. Pharmacokinetic assessment demonstrated that maximum plasma concentrations of LOXO­101 were reached 30–60 minutes following dosing. Exposure increased in approximate proportion with dose and was similar on Day 1 and Day 8 of repeated dosing in all subjects, and biologically relevant plasma levels have been achieved. LOXO­101 is well tolerated at doses for which biologically relevant plasma levels are achieved. The activity of LOXO­ 101 will be assessed in thyroid cancer patients with NTRK gene fusions in ongoing studies.

Poster 387 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Translational 9:00 AM MODULATION OF THYROIDAL RADIOIODIDE UPTAKE BY ONCOLOGICAL PIPELINE INHIBITORS AND APIGENIN A. Lakshmanan1, D. Scarberry1, J. Green2, X. Zhang2, S. Selmi­Ruby3, S.M. Jhiang1 1Physiology & Cell Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 2The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 3Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Lyon, France

Targeted radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer is based on selective stimulation of Na+/ I­ Symporter (NIS)­mediated radioactive iodide uptake (RAIU) in thyroid cells by thyrotropin. Patients with advanced thyroid cancer do not benefit from radioiodine therapy due to reduced or absent NIS expression. To identify inhibitors that can be readily translated into clinical care, we examined oncological pipeline inhibitors targeting Akt, MEK, PI3K, Hsp90 or BRAF in their ability to increase RAIU in thyroid cells expressing BRAFV600E or RET/PTC3 oncogene. Our data showed that (1) PI3Ki GDC­0941 outperformed other inhibitors in RAIU increase mainly by decreasing iodide efflux rate to a great extent; (2) RAIU increase by all inhibitors was extensively reduced by TGF­β, a cytokine secreted in the invasive fronts of thyroid cancers; (3) RAIU reduction by TGF­β was mainly mediated by NIS reduction and could be reversed by Apigenin, a plant­derived flavonoid; and (4) In the presence of TGF­β, GDC­0941 with Apigenin co­treatment had the highest RAIU level in both BRAFV600E expressing cells and RET/PTC3 expressing cells. Taken together, Apigenin may serve as a dietary supplement along with small molecule inhibitors to improve radioiodine therapeutic efficacy on invasive tumor margins thereby minimizing future metastatic events.

Poster 388 Thyroid Cancer Monday & Tuesday Poster Translational 9:00 AM INDIVIDUALIZED ASSESSMENT BY MRNA EXPRESSION OF HEDGEHOG PATHWAY MARKERS IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD OF PATIENTS WITH PERSISTENT MEDULLARY THYROID CANCER S.C. Lindsey1, C.P. Camacho1, M.G. Cardoso3, J.H. Lee1, R. Delcelo2, R.M. Maciel1, M.R. Dias­da­Silva1,3 1Medicine, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil 2Pathology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil 3Biochemistry, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Patients with advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) have an unfavorable prognosis. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been shown to be upregulated in MTC. We investigated whether Hh pathway components can be detected in patients with MTC by analyzing circulating mRNA expression, aiming at individualizing the management of MTC. Peripheral blood samples were collected for biochemical analysis and RNA extraction. RT­qPCR for expression of the receptor Smoothened (SMO), transcription factors GLI1 and GLI2, Suppressor of Fused (SUFU) and a reference gene (RPS8) was performed. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for SMO, GLI2 and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) was performed in tumor samples. We analyzed 40 patients – 22 with persistent disease (PD) and 18 with no biochemical or structural evidence of disease (NED) after having received standard treatment – and 23 thyroid­healthy controls. An ROC curve revealed that SMO mRNA relative expression (RE) could distinguish patients with PD from the NED group (sensitivity 52.6%, specificity 100%). SMO RE was significantly higher in the PD patients when compared to the NED group (  14;p=0.017). Thyroid­healthy controls had higher SMO RE than the NED group ( 14;p=0.038) and it was similar to the PD group. Correlation between SMO RE and serum calcitonin (sCt) was observed (r=0.534, p=0.001), as well as with CEA levels (r=0.515, p=0.001). Patients with sCt doubling­time (DT)24 months ( 14;p=0.006). SMO RE was also higher in patients with distant metastases (  14;p=0.032). The RE of SUFU, a Hh pathway suppressor, was negatively correlated with the expression of SMO in patients with PD (Fig. 1). GLI1 and GLI2 expression were not informative. IHC of tumor samples from 14/22 PD patients was positive for SHH in both primary tumor and a metastatic lymph node from one patient, who had very high SMO RE. Higher SMO mRNA relative expression in peripheral blood was associated with persistent disease, distant metastases, and with prognostic factors such as sCt DT.99). The therapeutic efficacy of RFA is not superior to that of EA; therefore, EA might be preferable as the first­line treatment for PCTNs.

Oral 461 Thyroid Cancer Wednesday Oral Translational 4:30 PM MULTI­GENE NEXT GENERATION SEQUENCING (THYROSEQ) ASSAY ON LOCALLY INVASIVE T4 WELL DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER U. Duvvuri1, M. Grimes2, L. Mady1, R. Ferris1, D.G. Winger3, S. Chiosea4, R. Seethala4, M. Nikiforova4, Y. Nikiforov4 1Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 2Medicine­ Endocrinology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 3Statistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 4Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

225/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Locally invasive well differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) poses a treatment dilemma because it frequently involves the critical structures. These tumors presumably arise from smaller lesions, and gain mutations as they progress. Delineating the mutational signature of these advanced tumors may allow us to develop a prognostic gene signature than can be used to stratify smaller WDTCs in the pre­operative setting. The aim of this study was to characterize the mutational landscape of T4 WDTC. We identified a cohort of T4 WDTC that did not have any histopathologic areas of anaplastic cancer or poor differentiation. All patients were treated with curative intent and had a minimum of 3 year follow­up. Pathology reports and slides were re­assessed. These tumors were subjected to molecular testing using the ThyroSeq v2.1 panel. The panel included 14 genes analyzed for point mutations and 42 types of gene fusions that occurring in thyroid cancer. In addition, 7 genes were assessed for expression in order to evaluate the cell composition of the samples. These data were then compared to Thyroseq v2.1 data obtained from a consecutive series of 102 WDTC of T1­3. Of 26 patients with T4 WDTC, successful sequencing data was obtained in 25 patients. The incidence of any molecular alteration was 96% (24/25). The most common mutation was BRAFV600E (76%). The second most frequent mutations were TERT mutations in 56% of patients: TERT C228T in 36% (9/25) and C250T in 20% (5/25). Interestingly, TERT/BRAFV600E co­mutations were identified in 48% (12/25). In contrast, only 4% of T1­3 tumors (5/103) demonstrated TERT/BRAFV600E co­mutations (p1 cm nodules (P=0.76 and 0.72 respectively). The ATA (intermediate+high) risk of recurrence (adjusted for gender) was not significantly higher in nodules >1cm than ≤1 cm (OR 1.32; 95% CI 0.33, 5.20. P=0.69). In the 13 malignant cases with nodule size ≤1 cm; 2 had extrathyroid extension, 2 had capsular invasion, 5 had lymphovascular invasion, and 6 had positive BRAF mutation (P>0.05). Calcifications on ultrasound and certain histopathologic features like extrathyroid extension, capsular & lymphovascular invasion, aggressive histology, BRAF mutation, and positive surgical margins were associated with high risk of disease recurrence and of a poor prognosis. Thyroid nodules with extrathyroid extension, aggressive histology, positive surgical margins, capsular or lymphovascular invasion are associated with poor outcomes and increased risk of recurrence. Recent ATA recommendations to follow smaller nodules without cytologic evaluation may not be justified in the light of identical outcomes and disease recurrence risk as for larger nodules. However, additional prospective studies are warranted for further investigations.

Short Oral Communication 471 Disorders of Thyroid Function Wednesday Short Oral Communication 4:06 PM EFFECTIVENESS OF LEVOTHYROXINE THERAPY TARGETING A THYROTROPIN LEVEL LOWER THAN 2.5 MU/L DURING THE FIRST TRIMESTER IN PREVENTING MISCARRIAGE: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY AT A SINGLE INSTITUTION S. Kobayashi1,2, J.Y. Noh2, N. Watanabe2, A. Yoshihara2, I. kurihara1, K. Ito2, H. Itoh1 1Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan 2Ito Hospital, Shibuya­ku, Japan

The American Thyroid Association 2011 guidelines recommend initiating levothyroxine therapy in subclinical hypothyroidism patients to achieve a thyrotropin level of lower than 2.5 mIU/l in the first trimester and lower than 3.0 mIU/l in the second and the third trimesters. However, the outcome of pregnancy when the thyrotropin levels are controlled in this manner have not been reported in the Japanese population. We enrolled the patients with thyroid diseases, excluding those with Graves' disease who were taking anti­thyroid drug or potassium iodide, when they are pregnant. Levothyroxine therapy was intiated or the dose of levothyroxine was adjusted to achieve a thyrotropin level lower than 2.5 mIU/l in the first trimester and lower than 3.0 mIU/l in the second and the third trimesters, each time the patient visited the hospital. The pregnancy outcomes of 420 patients who visited the hospital during the first trimester were analyzed. The median patient age was 34 years (range, 21–46 years). Forty­eight percent of patients were diagnosed with Hashimoto's disease; 17.9%, with TgAb or TPOAb negativity and/or thyroid nodules;16.2%, with Graves' disease in remission; 11.6%, with Graves' disease with radioiodine therapy or surgery; 7.4%, with thyroid tumor after surgery; 0.7%, with TSBAb­positive hypothyroidism. The pregnancy outcomes were as follows: miscarriage 14.3%, preterm delivery 5.7%, postterm delivery 0.2%, perinatal mortality 0.2%, and full­term birth 79.5%. In total, 82 patients visited the hospital twice until 10 weeks of pregnancy. The rate of miscarriage rate did not differ between patients with thyrotropin levels lower than 2.5 mIU/l at the first visit (median gestational age 3.6 weeks (3–6.7 weeks)) and patients with thyrotropin levels of 2.5 mIU/l or higher (8.0% vs 12.3%, p=0.7152). The rate of miscarriage was significantly lower in patients with thyrotropin levels lower than 2.5 mIU/l at the second visit (median gestational age, 8 weeks (6.1–9.9 weeks)) than in patients with thyrotropin levels of 2.5 mIU/l or higher (6.1% vs 31.3%, p=0.0121). Intensive levothyroxine therapy to achieve thyrotropin levels lower than 2.5 mU/l during first trimester is effective in prevention of miscarriage.

Short Oral Communication 472 Disorders of Thyroid Function Wednesday Short Oral Communication Clinical 4:12 PM LONGITUDINAL EVALUATION OF A GERIATRIC POPULATION ­ RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AND SUBCLINICAL HYPOTHYROIDISM DEFINED BY AGE­ADJUSTED CRITERIA FOR SERUM TSH L.B. Teixeira1, M.L. Nascimento1, M. Aroeira1, D.S. Chachamovitz1, M. Vaisman1, C. Paixão Junior2, P.F. Teixeira1 1UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 2UERJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Aging is associated with increases in serum TSH. The association between Subclinical Hypothyroidism (SCH) and depressive symptoms in the elderly subjects has not been proved in several studies. However, until now, none applied

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

230/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

age­specific reference range to determine the upper limit of serum TSH, in order to adequately classify SCH in such population. The present study aimed to evaluate the association between SCH (considering specific TSH cutoff for age) and depressive symptoms (DS) in the geriatric population monitored in specific outpatient clinic of a tertiary hospital. This was an observational longitudinal study, in which assessments of patients (≥65 years old) were performed at baseline and after 12 to 24 months of follow­up. In both instances the subjects were evaluated with: Clinic interview, chart review and measurements of serum thyrotropin (TSH) and FT4. Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) of 15 items was used in those with score of the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) ≥13 and the Cornell Scale for those with MMSE 5.8 mUI/L for individuals aged 65­79 years and >6.7 mUI/L for those aged ≥80 years). Two hundred forty nine patients were evaluated. Improvement of DS tended to occur more frequently in patients that developed SCH throughout the time (62.5% vs 31.5%; p=0.07). Furthermore, the presence of SCH was independently associated with improvement of DS in multivariate analysis (p=0.04; OR: 7.30 [1.06 to 50.13]) adjusted by diabetes, smoke habitus, periphery arterial disease, age >85yo, stroke, acute myocardial infarct, loss cognition, excess pharmacy use, reduced functionality, fall syndrome and anti depressive use. Baseline serum FT4 was positively associated with variations in Cornell scale (rs=+ 0.331;p=0.04) and the incident depressive syndrome (independent from scale) was associated with higher overall levels of FT4 at the end of study (1.12 vs 1.09; p=0.02). It was concluded that the presence of SCH, defined by specific levels of TSH for age, had a favorable impact in depressive symptoms of elderly patients. Furthermore, serum FT4 had a negative impact in different studied outcomes related to DS.

Short Oral Communication 473 Disorders of Thyroid Function Wednesday Short Oral Communication Clinical 4:18 PM BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN A SUBGROUP REQUIRING T4 PLUS T3 REPLACEMENT TO REVERSE SYMPTOMS OF HYPOTHYROIDISM G.M. Pepper1,2, P. Casanova1,2, K. Reynolds1,2 1University of Miami, Jupiter, FL 2Palm Beach Diabetes and Endocrinology, Jupiter, FL

Individuals with hypothyroidism may report persistent symptoms typical of thyroid hormone deficiency despite peripheral thyroid hormone levels in the normal range. One possible explanation proposed by Bianco et al is tissue specific variation in deiodinase conversion of levothyroxine (LT4) to triiodothyronine (T3) resulting in normalization of TSH levels before peripheral T3 levels are optimized. To investigate this we analyzed thyroid functions of hypothyroid patients with satisfactory and unsatisfactory clinical responses to LT4. Those in the latter group also achieved substantial clinical benefit after conversion to a product containing LT4 and T3 (Armour Thyroid). We retrospectively reviewed T4, T3 and TSH levels in three groups of adults; 1. Good responders (GR); clinically euthyroid on LT4, N=67. 2. Poor responders (PR), persistent symptoms of hypothyroidism on LT4 who reported substantial improvement after conversion to Armour Thyroid, N=57. 3. Normal controls (NC), N=54 Tukey­Kramer's test indicated mean T4/T3 ratio significantly greater in GR (10.3±1.9) than PR (9.3±2.5) and NC (8.5±2.0); prT3∼T2, while MCT10 shows preference for T3∼rT3>T4∼T2. We also show for the first time that MCT8 and MCT10 facilitate cellular export of MIT and DIT. Export of MIT by MCT8 is inhibited by T4 and T3, however the same is not observed for DIT. Uptake of MIT and DIT by COS1 cells appears to be mediated by LAT1. Both LAT1 and LAT2 are capable of transporting MIT and DIT. We found that uptake of MIT and DIT by COS1 cells is inhibited by the specific LAT inhibitor BCH. RT­qPCR analysis shows that COS­ 1 cells express LAT1, but not LAT2. Also in COS1 cells overexpressing LAT1 or LAT2, co­transfection with MCT8 or MCT10 results in a marked reduction in cellular accumulation of MIT and DIT, in agreement with efficient efflux of MIT and DIT by MCT8 and MCT10. We demonstrate effective cellular uptake of MIT and DIT by LAT1 and LAT2, and effective cellular efflux of these

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

233/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

iodotyrosines by MCT8 and MCT10.

Short Oral Communication 479 Thyroid Hormone Metabolism & Regulation Wednesday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:24 PM DIFFERENT EFFECTS OF PTU AND MMI ON THYROID­SPECIFIC GENE EXPRESSION A. Yoshihara1,2, M. Sue1, K. Oda1,2, Y. Ishido2, Y. Luo2, N. Hiroi1, K. Suzuki2 1Faculty of Medicine, Toho university, Tokyo, Japan 2Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Medical Technology, Teikyo University, Tokyo, Japan

Propylthiouracil (PTU) and methimazole (MMI) are widely used for treatment for Graves' disease. They share the similar inhibitory effect on thyroid hormone biosynthesis by interfering with thyroid peroxidase (TPO)­mediated oxidation of iodine. However, their possible effects on other thyroid­specific functional molecules have not been comprehensively studied. The effects of PTU and MMI on thyroid­specific gene expression were evaluated in thyroid FRTL­5 cells. The mRNA expression was analyzed by DNA microarray and real­time PCR, whereas the protein expressions were further analyzed by western blotting. In the presence of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), both PTU and MMI suppressed thyroid transcription factor 1 (Nkx2­1), monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Slc16A2), the putative transporter of thyroid hormone (TH) from thyrocytes into circulation, and iodotyrosine deiodinase (Dehal1), the essential enzyme for recycling of iodine after Tg proteolysis. However, the suppressive effect of PTU on NKx2­1, Slc16A2 and Dehal1 was completely abolished in the absence of TSH, suggesting that the effect of PTU requires TSH. On the other hand, MMI still suppressed Dehal1 expression in the absence of TSH. The expression of sodium/iodide symporter (NIS; Slc5a5), the transporter of iodine on the basolateral membrane of thyrocytes, was significantly stimulated by PTU. The current study showed that the suppressive effects of PTU and MMI in thyrocytes are not only TPO­mediated catalytic reactions, but also extends to the suppression of thyroid­specific functional genes expression, e.g. Nkx2­1, Slc16a2, and Dehal1. Moreover, the current study suggests that PTU and MMI may use different mechanisms to regulate Dehal1 expression, and TSH may play essential and differential roles in mediating PTU and MMI signals in thyrocytes. Potential PTU or MMI­induced suppression of TH efflux and/or iodide recycling in thyrocytes should be further examined by functional studies.

Short Oral Communication 480 Thyroid Hormone Action Wednesday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:00 PM MULTI­OMICS CHARACTERIZATION OF A HUMAN THYROTOXICOSIS MODEL M. Pietzner1, B. Engelmann2, T. Kacprowski2, J. Golchert2, A. Dirk4, G. Homuth2, E. Hammer2, M. Nauck1, H. Wallaschofski1, T. Münte3, N. Friedrich1, U. Völker2, G. Brabant4 1Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany 2Interfaculty Institute for Genetics and Functional Genomics, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany 3Department of Neurology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany 4Department of Internal Medicine I, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany

In a variety of clinical conditions the standard approach based on TSH and free thyroid hormone measurement fails to classify thyroid hormone (TH) status. Other biochemical markers as well as SHBG are insufficient to overcome this drawback. In search for new markers we applied an untargeted metabolome and proteome approach in a model of experimental thyrotoxicosis in humans. Sixteen young healthy males were given 250μg levothyroxine (L­T4) per day for eight weeks. Plasma was sampled before treatment, after four and eight weeks of treatment, as well as four and eight weeks after treatment. Metabolite and protein levels were determined by mass spectrometry. Mixed­effect linear regression models with serum free thyroxine (FT4) as exposure and metabolite/protein levels as outcome were evaluated. To compile a bio­molecule signature discriminating between thyrotoxicosis and euthyroidism, a random forest was trained and validated in a two­stage cross­validation procedure. Despite no obvious clinical symptoms we observed profound molecular alterations. About one third of the metabolites and proteins were significantly positively (2/3) or negatively (1/3) associated with serum FT4. In line with known TH action, lipid and amino acid metabolism were profoundly altered. Additionally, new strong, positive associations were detected for γ­glutamyl amino acids. Functional characterization of significantly affected proteins highlighted not only established TH­affected pathways, e.g. coagulation cascade and apolipoproteins, but also novel associations were found related to the complement system. Robust and good (AUC=0.86) discrimination between thyrotoxicosis and euthyroidism was achieved with a signature of 15 metabolites/proteins. Our results emphasize the power of untargeted OMICS approaches to reveal novel pathways of TH action. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such studies have the potential to identify new molecular signatures, beyond TSH and FT4, for diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disorders.

Short Oral Communication 481 Thyroid Hormone Action Wednesday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:06 PM THYROTROPIN­RELEASING HORMONE (TRH) REGULATES COLD­INDUCED ADAPTIVE THERMOGENESIS IN

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

234/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

BROWN ADIPOSE TISSUE A. Ozawa, T. Watanabe, T. Tomaru, S. Ishii, N. Shibusawa, M. Mori, T. Satoh, M. Yamada 1. Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Japan Thyrotropin­releasing hormone (TRH) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) controls the hypothalamic­ pituitary­thyroid (H­P­T) axis. A rapid and transient increase of TRH has been reported to be required for the acute increase in the level of thyroid hormone in response to cold­exposure. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is the primary site of thermogenesis in small mammals, and the thermogenic capacity of BAT is primarily due to expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). Thyroid hormones are considered as key regulators of energy expenditure through the activation of UCP1. In this study, we examined the roles of TRH in the cold­induced activation of the H­P­ T axis and also in regulating the thermogenic activity of BAT. We exposed TRH­deficient mice (TRH­/­), exhibited characteristic tertiary hypothyroidism, to 4°C for 240 min. Blood samples and BAT were obtained at various time points. Serum TSH, free T4 and corticosterone were measured at each time points. An expression level of mRNA from BAT was detected using Real­time PCR method for UCP1 and related factors. (1) The rectal temperature decreased to 20°C in TRH­/­, but showed no significant change in wild­type mice (WT). The replacement of thyroid hormone with T4, to achieve euthyroid status in TRH­/­ (TRH­/­+T4), reversed this decrease partially, but significantly. (2) The increase in the serum TSH at 90 min after cold exposure and thyroid hormones levels at 120 min observed in WT was abolished in TRH­/­+T4. The level of corticosterone was not significantly changed at any points in each genotype. (3) A marked increase of UCP1 of BAT was detected in WT after cold exposure, but not in TRH­/­+T4. A significant increase of PGC­1, Dio2 and FGF21, those are considered as activators for UCP1, was also disappeared in TRH­/­+T4. TRH is involved in the rise of TSH and thyroid hormone in response to cold stress. TRH is also involved in adaptive thermogenesis in BAT other than via the H­P­T axis. The transcriptional program of adaptive thermogenesis in BAT via prolonged sympathetic stimulation induced by cold exposure requires TRH.

Short Oral Communication 482 Thyroid Hormone Action Wednesday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:12 PM THYROID HORMONE UPTAKE AND EFFLUX PROFILES DIFFER AT THE L­TYPE AMINO ACID TRANSPORTER 2 K.M. Hinz, D. Neef, G. Krause Leibniz­Institut fuer molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP), Berlin, Germany Thyroid hormones (THs) traverse the cell membrane by transporter proteins, amongst others also by the L­type amino acid transporter Lat2, which is expressed in diverse tissues. Previously we showed that Lat2 is involved in the uptake of mainly T2 and to a somewhat lesser extent of T3 but neither in uptake of rT3 nor T4. Initial structure­ function­studies localized sensitive amino acids of Lat2 for TH uptake by homology model driven mutations. However the complete molecular mechanism of TH traversing remained unclear. We want to clarify i) why T4 is not imported, ii) which substrates are exported out of the cell by Lat2 and iii) the associated molecular determinants. We investigate transport characteristics of homology model guided mutations of Lat2 and TH­substrate features for murine Lat2. Using the Xenopus laevis oocytes as expression system we analysed the uptake and efflux of TH­ derivatives by Lat2 variants. Here we highlight two amino acids Y3.36 and F6.46 at either side of a central traversing channel within the transmembrane domain of Lat2. Five side chain shortening mutations showing increased T2 uptake widened this channel of Lat2 differently. However, only one mutation Y3.36A made the uptake of T4 possible, indicating that the large side chain of Y3.36 impedes the uptake of bulky T4 in Lat2. Reverse effect was observed for side chain enlargement F6.46W showing an increased T2, but a decreased uptake of amino acids Leu and Phe. A potential iodine/ aromat interaction seems to play a role for TH transport at this position. Both amino acids are imported and exported as well by Lat2. Notably mutation N3.39S increased the efflux of Phe and Leu. Unexpected results are observed for the efflux of THs by Lat2. Although T2 is imported by Lat2 no T2 efflux is observed. The characterized different TH uptake and efflux profiles for Lat2 are important contributions to reveal determinants of the molecular traversing mechanisms. Just one residue obstructs the T4 uptake. The results are of importance regarding the growing interest in T2 that can also trigger cellular responses, since Lat2 imports mainly T2 and T3.

Short Oral Communication 483 Thyroid Hormone Action Wednesday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:18 PM TRIIODOTHYRONINE (T3) MAY PREVENT FASTING­INDUCED SKELETAL MUSCLE ATROPHY IN VITRO AND IN VIVO C. Mangialardo1, I. Cammarata1, V. Russi1, M. Santaguida3, C. Virili3, V. Moresi4, M. Centanni1, C. Verga Falzacappa1,2 1Medico­surgical sciences and biotechnologies, Sapienza, University of Rome, Rome, Italy 2Istituto Pasteur­Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Rome, Italy 3Experimental Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy 4Anatomy, Histology, Forensic Medicine and Orthopedic, Section of Histology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome,

Italy Skeletal muscle atrophy is a weakening condition that may ensue from prolonged muscle disuse, cancer cachexia,

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

235/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

anorexia etc. Functional and morphological features may include decreased muscle fiber cross­ sectional area and protein content, reduced force, and increased fatigability. Adequate intracellular T3 concentration warrants healthy muscle homeostasis, while both hyper­ and hypothyroidism lead to muscle weakness, hypotrophy and atrophy. However, it is still unknown whether T3 may have an effect on muscle atrophy. Aim of the study was to analyze the effects of T3 treatment on muscle atrophy in vitro and in vivo . In vitro muscle atrophy was induced in C2C12 derived myotubes either by serum starvation or by TNFalpha treatment [100 ng/ml] for 48h, in the presence or the absence of T3 [100 nM]. The cross sectional area measurements were evaluated on May Grunwald Giemsa stained samples. In vivo 8 wks male BALB/c mice were food­deprived for 48 hours, to induce muscle atrophy, and simultaneously treated with intraperitoneal injections of either T3 [100 μg/kg BW] or vehicle [NaCl 0.95%], as a control. A strong reduction in diameters was observed in both starved­ (40±2 %) and TNFalpha­ (65±7 %) treated myotubes, while T3­treated myotubes showed no such a reduction (25±5 %). Moreover, T3­treatment prevented starvation­ induced Atrogin1 expression, an atrophy marker gene. These in vitro data on myotubes were confirmed in vivo. In Balb­c mice, despite T3 treatment, starvation led to a 20±3 % reduction in the whole body weight. Upon starvation, Tibialis anterior (TA) weight was reduced (17±5 %) in untreated mice, while in T3­treated mice no significant (8±4%) TA weight reduction was observed. Morphometric analyses confirmed an even variation in myofiber size in this muscle (­ 25±4% stv vs ctrl, −2±1,5 % stv T3 vs ctrl). In summary, our data showed a protective effect of T3 treatment in starvation­induced muscle atrophy, both in vitro and in vivo.

Short Oral Communication 484 Thyroid Hormone Action Wednesday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:24 PM FURTHER INSIGHTS INTO THYROID HORMONE (TH) ACTION AT THE INITIATION OF ADAPTIVE IMMUNITY: TRIIODOTHYRONINE (T3) TILTS THE BALANCE TOWARDS A PRO­INFLAMMATORY PROFILE V.A. Alamino1, M. Montesinos1, N. Gigena1, A. Blidner2, A.M. Masini­Repiso1, G.A. Rabinovich2, C.G. Pellizas1 1Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología (CIBICI­CONICET) and Departamento de Bioquímica

Clínica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina 2Laboratorio de Inmunopatología, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME­CONICET) and Departamento

de Química Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires., Buenos Aires, Argentina We reported TH receptor β1 expression in mice dendritic cells (DCs), the main antigen (Ag)­presenting cells, and T3­ dependent stimulation of DC maturation and ability to develop a Th1­type response. Moreover, T3 reduced DC apoptosis, and increased DC ability to stimulate a cytotoxic Ag­specific response and Ag cross­presentation. In agreement, T3 stimulated DC­based immunotherapy reduced the incidence of B16 melanoma establishment and growth in affected mice, prolonging their survival. Besides, regulatory T (Treg) and T helper (Th) 17 cells are lymphocyte subsets with opposing actions: Th17 are key effector cells, while Treg are essential cells for immunologic tolerance. Hence, their balance has been implicated in the development of inflammatory, autoimmune and neoplastic processes. Here, we aim to disclose the effect of T3­stimulated DCs in the homeostasis between these pro­ inflammatory/regulatory profiles Mice bone marrow derived DCs were pulsed with T3 (5nM) for 18 h. Intracellular and secreted cytokine production was assayed by flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. The ability of DC to stimulate allogenic splenocytes was assessed in a mixed lymphocyte reaction and the expression of different profiles markers was analyzed by flow cytometry T3 stimulated DC production of the Th17­skewing cytokines IL­6, IL­23 and IL­1β. In accordance, allogenic splenocytes co­cultured with T3­matured DCs secreted higher levels of IL­17. The augmented IL­17 production was mainly derived from γδ T cells, although Th17 cells were also involved. On the other hand, T3 reduced the expression of programmed death­ligand­1 (PD­L1) in DCs, an inhibitory molecule associated with immune tolerance. In agreement, T3­treated DC decreased the frequency of Treg cells, revealed by a reduction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells These results reinforce the critical role of T3 in the regulation and maintenance of immune homeostasis since T3­ activated DCs favor the promotion of adaptive immunity towards a pro­inflammatory profile. Our findings may be exploited to manipulate the immunogenic potential of DCs to positively regulate the development of protective immunity or negatively control the generation of autoimmune diseases.

Short Oral Communication 485 Thyroid Cancer Wednesday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:00 PM SIMILARITY OF GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES BETWEEN THYROID STEM CELLS AND ANAPLASTIC THYROID CARCINOMA M. Iwadate Laboratory of Metabolism, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD The nature of thyroid stem cells and thyroid cancer stem cells is poorly understood. In order to address this question, a side population (SP) cells­derived thyroid cell line (SPTL) was established from mouse thyroid side population cells. When GFP­tagged SPTL cells were directly injected into the thyroid glands of immunocompromised mice, or intravenously administered through the tail vein after partial thyroidectomy, some SPTL cells were found in thyroid follicles. These data demonstrated that SPTL cells can contribute to thyroid regeneration, suggesting their ability as thyroid stem/progenitor cells. Total RNAs were prepared from SP and MP (main population, non­SP) cells right after sorting, and SPTL cells. The RNA­seq libraries (5 ng) were subjected to sequencing on a Hiseq 2000 (Illumina, San Diego, CA).

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

236/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

SPTL and SP cells shared 584 and 940 commonly up­ and down­regulated genes among those having fold changes ≥2 (log2FC≥1) with an FDR≤0.01. The commonly up­regulated genes included Sca1 while commonly down­regulated genes included Tg, Tshr, Tpo, Nkx2­1, Pax8, and Foxe1. Signal Transduction Pathway Association analysis revealed that the most up­ and down­regulated signal transduction pathways were those related to TGF­beta and epithelial­ mesenchymal transition (EMT). The expression of EMT­related genes such as Tgfb2, Tgfb3, Snai1, Snai2, and Vim was higher in SP/SPTL cells as compared to MP cells, while the expression of Cdh1, the epithelial marker, was lower in SP/SPTL cells. Our results were compared with the mRNA profiles using microarray analysis of 59 thyroid tumors (11 ATC and 48 PTC as reported in Hebrant et al, PLoS One, 2012). The commonly up­regulated genes in SP/SPTL cells and ATC included SAIL2, TWIST1, and VIM, while the commonly down­regulated genes were TSHR, TPO, NKX2­1, and FOXE1. The gene expression patterns were similar between SP/SPTL cells and ATC. The SPTL cells could provide a useful tool to study thyroid adult stem/progenitor cells as well as thyroid cancer­ initiating cells, and to understand the mechanisms that separate the differentiation process to become thyroid from the pathway to develop thyroid cancers.

Short Oral Communication 486 Thyroid Cancer Wednesday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:06 PM INHIBITION OF SRC SIGNALING PROMOTES AN INCREASED RELIANCE ON THE MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE PATHWAY IN PAPILLARY AND ANAPLASTIC THYROID CANCER T.C. Beadnell, K.E. Wuensch, S.M. Riffert, R. Schweppe Medicine, UC Denver, Aurora, CO Src plays an important role in thyroid cancer growth, invasion, and metastasis. To further understand how to effectively target Src, we previously generated 2 BRAF­ (BCPAP & SW1736) and 2 RAS­mutant (C643 & Cal62) cell lines resistant to the Src inhibitor, dasatinib, and observed increased MAPK pathway activation in both BRAF­ and RAS­mutant resistant cell lines, and the drug­resistant c­SrcT341M mutation in the RAS­mutant cell lines. These data indicate that Src inhibition promotes increased signaling through the MAPK pathway as a common mechanism of resistance. Here, we hypothesize that MEK inhibition can overcome resistance to targeted inhibition of Src with dasatinib. The effects of Src and MAPK pathway inhibition were tested using in vitro growth and apoptosis assays and an in vivo xenograft model. Consistent with increased MAPK activity in the dasatinib­resistant (DasRes) cells, here we show the growth of the DasRes cell lines exhibit enhanced sensitivity (3­ to 39­ fold) to the MEK1/2 inhibitor, trametinib, in the presence of dasatinib. Western blot analysis in the BRAF­mutant DasRes cells, indicated that Src and MEK1/2 inhibition is important for increased MEK1/2 inhibitor sensitivity. Whereas, in the RAS­mutant DasRes cells, trametinib sensitivity is likely through dasatinib mediated paradoxical c­Src activation and phosphorylation of pY925­FAK, a Grb2 binding site, which promotes MAPK activation. In vivo, MEK1/2 inhibition resulted in an initial inhibition of tumor growth in the RAS­mutant Cal62 parental tumors (5.26 fold; p­value=0.0031). However, the parental tumors became refractory to trametinib after 30 days. In contrast, the DasRes Cal62 tumors exhibited a 5.5­fold greater inhibition of final tumor volume in response to trametinib (DR vs P; p=0.0009), with complete responses in 3 out of 8 DasRes tumors. Finally, up­front dasatinib and trametinib treatment resulted in strong synergistic inhibition of growth (CI=0.1­0.3) and increased apoptosis (4­ to 19­fold) in vitro. Prolonged inhibition of Src reprograms thyroid cancer cells to become more reliant on the MAPK pathway, providing further rational for this combination therapy and a potential mechanism for Src and MEK1/2 inhibitor synergy.

Short Oral Communication 487 Thyroid Cancer Wednesday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:12 PM NOVEL THERAPIES IDENTIFIED IN PATIENT DERIVED THYROID CANCER XENOGRAFTS. L.A. Marlow1, J.C. Hall1, A.C. Mathias2, L.K. Dawson2, W.F. Durham2, K.A. Meshaw2, R.J. Mullin2, D. Small2, A. Synnott2, D. Milosevic3, B.C. Netzel3, S.K. Grebe3, M. Ryder4, P. Weinberger5, R.C. Smallridge1,4, J.A. Copland1 1Cancer Biology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 2Charles River Discovery Services, Morrisville, NC 3Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 4Endocrinology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 5Otolaryngology, Georgia Reagents University, Augusta, GA

The success of clinical trials designed on the basis of pre­clinical models has been minimal for patients with radioiodine resistant aggressive thyroid cancer. There is a dire need to develop improved pre­clinical models for these tumors that have the capability to translate more reliably from bench to bedside, thus allowing improved selection of novel therapeutic agents. Patient­derived xenograft (PDX) models are purported to most closely replicate a patient's response to therapy due to preservation of tumor heterogeneity and microenvironment. Thus, we have developed a panel of pre­clinical thyroid cancer PDX models by implanting patient tumor tissue into immunocompromised mice characterizing the models and testing therapeutics. Each model is characterized and compared to the originating patient tumor tissue by short tandem repeat (STR) analysis for DNA fingerprinting, immunohistochemistry (IHC) for thyroid markers, and for oncogenic driver mutations. We have developed ten PDX models that include follicular variant papillary thyroid carcinoma (FVPTC), insular thyroid carcinoma (ITC), poorly differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma (PDTC), squamous cell thyroid carcinoma (SCTC), and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC). Each model demonstrates its own unique responses to radiation; cytotoxic therapies (doxorubicin, cisplatin, paclitaxel) or molecular targeted therapies such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

237/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

(sorafenib, sunitinib, pazopanib, erlotinib), BRAF inhibitor (dabrafenib), MEK inhibitor (trametinib), farnesyl transferase inhibitor (tipifarnib), and proteasome inhibitor (carfilzomib). Furthermore, in a HRAS mutant ATC PDX model, remarkable responses are seen with combination therapy sunitinib plus paclitaxel. We expect that this might provide the rationale for some of these therapeutic strategies to move forward towards clinical trials.

Short Oral Communication 488 Thyroid Cancer Wednesday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:18 PM DEVELOPMENT OF AN ORAL SMALL MOLECULE TSH RECEPTOR AGONIST FOR DIAGNOSIS OF RESIDUAL/RECURRENT THYROID CANCER S. Neumann2, M. Cullen2, E. Eliseeva2, R.F. Place1, M. Gershengorn2 1Nova Therapeutics LLC, Pasadena, CA 2National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD

Radioactive iodine (RAI) thyroid scans are commonly used to diagnose residual/recurrent thyroid cancer. Currently, the only approved drug to stimulate RAI uptake (RAIU) is thyrotropin alfa (ThyrogenTM); a recombinant form of human TSH (hTSH). It is administered via intramuscular injection over 2 consecutive days by a trained healthcare provider prior to RAIU. While effective, an orally available equivalent would offer benefits to both clinicians and patients by providing a noninvasive route of drug administration. In 2009, we identified the first small molecule agonist capable of stimulating RAIU in mice by selectively targeting an allosteric site in the transmembrane domain of the TSH receptor (TSHR). Herein, we share our latest advancements on the path toward developing a new drug for thyroid cancer. We have performed a series of methods including (but not limited to): (i) stereochemical purification of a lead candidate TSHR agonist in conjunction with dose response analyses and time course studies to define in vitro drug profiles; (ii) molecular modeling to visualize enantiomer binding to the TSHR transmembrane pocket; and (iii) excipient solubility screens in conjunction with oral delivery, T4 measurement, and RAIU analysis in mice with comparison to thyrotropin alfa (utilizing a converted human equivalent dose). We have identified a new molecular enantiomer (referred to as E2) with improved drug­like properties including superior in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy in comparison to other drug candidates. We have also surveyed several excipient formulations in order to facilitate safe oral delivery of E2. In addition, we have identified a translatable oral dosing schedule capable of facilitating RAIU in mice equivalent to thyrotropin alfa. E2 represents the next step toward developing a new oral drug for patients with thyroid cancer to stimulate RAIU with possible clinical (e.g. noninvasive delivery allowing for easier self­administration by patients) and economical (e.g. manufacturing costs and reduced clinical visits as a consequence of circumventing IM injection) benefits over the current standard of care.

Short Oral Communication 489 Thyroid Cancer Wednesday Short Oral Communication Basic 4:24 PM GENISTEIN­A POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC FACTOR FOR HIGH RISK PAPILLARY THYROID CARCINOMA WITH BRAFV600E MUTATION Z. Liu1, K. Kakudo2, C. Zhang1, X. Cui1 1Department of Pathology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, China 2Department of Pathology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Otoda­cho, Japan

Genistein is the main component of isoflavones, which has been reported to have anticarcinoma effect in different carcinomas but not in thyroid carcinoma. Clinically, patients of PTC with BRAFV600E mutation have a higher rate of recurrence and metastasis but little is known on its additional treatment. This study focuses on the anti­tumor role of Genistein in papillary thyroid carcinoma and tries to provide an additional method for the treatment of high risk group thyroid carcinoma. BHP10­3 harboring with RET/PTC 1 rearrangement and BCPAP harboring BRAFV600E mutation were treated with gradient concentration of Genistein. The morphological changes of the tumor cells were evaluated microscopically. Cellular proliferation, cycle and apoptosis were determined by MTS proliferation assay, Annexin­V apoptosis assay and cell cycle assay by Flow Cytometry, respectively. The expression of proliferation markers cyclinD1, cyclinA2 and cyclinB1 were demonstrated by qRT­PCR and Western blotting. Genistein inhibits the proliferation of both cell lines (Pupper limit of normal and cortisol post SST at cut­off value). Unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia can occur in severe pernicious anemia due to ineffective erythropoiesis as seen in our patient. Pancytopenia is sometimes present in severe megaloblastic anemia and in many case series from the Indian Sub­continent megaloblastic anemia is among the most frequent causes of pancytopenia. It is due to increased apoptosis of the hematopoietic cell precursors. A diagnosis of evolving APS II was made as the patient had autoimmune hypothyroidism, evolving adrenal insufficiency and pernicious anemia. Patient was given 75ug of Levothyroxine and Intramuscular Cyanocobalamin 1000 ug every 3 days for 6 doses. After 3 weeks of treatment, the laboratory parameters improved: Hb 8.1%; TLC 7300/cc; Platelet: 160,000/cc and Total Bilirubin 1.6mg/dl. He was advised intramuscular Cyanocobalamin 3 monthly lifelong. He was advised stress dose of glucocorticoids and monitoring of serum cortisol on a regular basis as his adrenal insufficiency seemed to be evolving. Anti­21 hydroxylase antibody was not done as this was not available. This case shows that in APS II, sometimes the obvious symptoms of hypothyroidism and adrenal insufficiency may be absent, as the disease is insiduous in onset and progression. A high index of suspicion is needed in subtle or atypical presentations.

Poster 512 Autoimmunity Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM PREVALENCE OF THYROID AUTOANTIBODIES IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH THYROID NODULES: THE FUKUSHIMA HEALTH MANAGEMENT SURVEY Y. Ito1, S. Suzuki2,3, T. Fukushima2,3, S. Midorikawa3, T. Matsuzuka4, T. Ohhira3, M. Abe3, S. Yamashita3, A. 3

2

1,3

Ohtsuru , S. Suzuki , H. Shimura http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

249/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima­shi, Japan 2Department of Thyroid and Endocrinology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima­shi, Japan 3Radiation Medical Science Center for the Fukushima Health Management Survey, Fukushima Medical University,

Fukushima­shi, Japan 4Department of Otolaryngology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima­shi, Japan

Fukushima Prefecture has started Thyroid Ultrasound Examination Program as a part of Fukushima Health Management Survey after the accident of the Fukushima Dai­ichi Nuclear Power Plant. Anti­thyroglobulin (TgAb) and anti­thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) antibodies were measured in the confirmatory examinations in this program for participants with thyroid nodules more than 5.0 mm and cysts more than 20.0 mm in diameter. Although autoimmune thyroiditis is the most common thyroid disorder in the pediatric age range, prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies in the pediatric population has not been well known. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies and its relationship with sonographic findings in children and adolescents with thyroid nodules in Fukushima. This study was a cross­sectional study between October 2011 and March 2014. 1747 children and adolescents (597 males and 1130 females) were subjected to this study. The age of subjects ranged from 2 to 21 years, and the median age was16 years. Serum TgAb and TPOAb were determined by electro­chemiluminescence immunoassays. TgAb, TPOAb, and either antibody were positive in 13.7%, 9.7%, 16.3% of the subjects, respectively. There were significant differences in prevalence of TgAb, TPOAb, and either antibody between male and female subjects. However, age­dependent increase in positivity ratio of TgAb or TPOAb was not observed. 32.6% and 33.3% of subjects with positive TgAb or TPOAb exhibited sonographic features suggesting diffuse thyroid disorders, respectively. In addition, the prevalence of TgAb in subjects who were classified as malignancy or suspicious for malignancy was significantly higher than that with other classifications. However, there was no significant difference in positivity of TPOAb. Results in this study suggest the prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies in children and adolescents with thyroid nodules are comparable to those in adult population. It was suggested that approximately one third of autoantibody­positive subjects exhibited diffuse histological alterations. Association between TgAb and thyroid cancer was also shown in the pediatric population.

Poster 513 Autoimmunity Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM THE PRESENCE OF THYROID­STIMULATION BLOCKING ANTIBODY PREVENT HIGH BONE TURNOVER IN UNTREATED PREMENOPAUSAL PATIENTS WITH GRAVES' DISEASE S. Moon1, S. Cho1, J. Bae1, Y. Hwangbo1, Y. Song1, J. Moon1, K. Jung1, Y. Kim1, M. Moon1, K. Yi1, J. Chung3, Y. Park1, D. Park1, B. Cho2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of) 2Department of Internal Medicine, Chung­Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of) 3Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)

Osteoporosis­related fracture is one of the complications of Graves' disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid­stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves' disease patients might oppositely impact on bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves' disease patients were enrolled (n=93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid­stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n=83) and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid­stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n=10). From stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values of free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) to blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity­matched control (n=11). Bone turnover markers, BS­ALP, Osteocalcin, and C­telopeptide were significantly lower in blocking activity group than stimulating activity or stimulating activity­matched control groups. TBII level showed positive correlations with BS­ALP and osteocalcin levels in stimulating activity group, while it showed negative correlation with osteocalcin level in blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody­activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid­stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects on bone metabolism in Graves' disease.

Poster 514 Autoimmunity Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM A NEW BIOASSAY FOR THYROID­STIMULATING ANTIBODIES (AEQUORIN TSAB) IN GRAVES' OPHTHALMOPATHY Y. Hiromatsu1, N. Araki3, H. Eguchi1, J. Tani1, Y. Teshima2, K. Mitsuzaki1 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan 3Diagnostic Division, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Tokushima, Japan

Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the autoimmunity against thyroid­ stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor in the orbit. The TSH receptor antibody (TRAb) are used for the diagnosis and assessment of GO. Recently a novel assay for thyroid­stimulating antibody (TSAb) has been introduced using a frozen

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

250/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Chinese hamster ovary cell line expressing the TSH receptor, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)­gated calcium channel and aequorin (aequorin TSAb). The aim of the study is to evaluate the roles of the aequorin TSAb in GO. We studied 136 Japanese patients with GO (22 euthyroid and 8 hypothyroid Graves' disease) in our hospital. TRAbs were measured by the 1st generation TRAb (TRAb1st, TRAb Cosmic III kit, Cosmic Co, Japan), the 2nd generation assay (hTRAb, DYNO test TRAb Human ‘Yamasa', Yamasa Co., Japan) and the conventional TSAb kit ‘Yamasa', (Yamasa) and the new aequorin TSAb assay (Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Japan). The informed consents were obtained from patients and the institutional approval was obtained from the Kurume University School of Medicine. The aequorin TSAb, conventional TSAb, TRAb1st and hTRAb were positive in 125/136 (92%), 110/136 (81%), 81/130 (62%) and 93/114 (82%), respectively. In hyperthyroid Graves' disease those were positive in 98/106 (98%), 96/106 (91%), 78/101 (77%) and 84/93 (90%), respectively. In patients with euthyroid Graves' disease those were positive in 19/22 (86%), 9/22 (41%), 1/21 (5%), and 6/17 (35%), respectively. In hypothyroid Graves' disease those were positive in 8/8 patients (100%), 5/8 (63%), 2/8 (25%), and 3/4 (75%), respectively. The aequorin TSAb levels were significantly related to TRAb1st (r=0.4172 P2.10. The diagnostic value of SR>2.1 were higher than ES>3 and conventional US (z=3.595, 4.876, p2.1 did not show significant enhancement of diagnostic value compared to SR>2.58 (z=0.439, p=0.8903>0.001) in PTMC with HT. There is a negative relation between SR and titer of TPO­Ab(r=­0.650, p2.58, ES>3. d: Taking the data from 181 nodules with HT as integrity, the best cut­off of diagnosing malignancy was SR>2.10, ES>3. e: The diagnostic value of SR and ES were higher than conventional US (z=1.058, http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

255/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS 6.899, p2.58 was also higher than ES>3 (z=0.474, p2.1 were higher than ES>4 and conventional US (z=3.595, 4.876, p2.1 did not show significant enhance of diagnostic value compared to SR>2.58 (z=0.439, p=0.8903>0.001) Information about Downloading

View larger version (45K) Poster 525 Autoimmunity Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM PREVALENCE OF HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS IN TYPE 1 DIABETES ADULTS M.M. Oliveira, P. Tavares, S. Monteiro, P. Rodrigues, A. Sousa, E. Lemos, I. Duarte, B. Sobral, A. Tavora, C. Guerra, G. Rocha Endocrinology, Centro Hospitalar Vila Nova de Gaia, Porto, Portugal The prevalence of autoimmune diseases is high in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) patients. Autoimmune thyroid disease, especially Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is the most prevalent. The diagnosis depends of the presence of serum peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) and inflammatory structural changes identified by a variety of sonographic criteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of TPOAb, thyroid dysfunction (TD) and some parameters in thyroid sonography like volume, echogenicity, sonographic texture, nodules and vascularity, in DM1 patients, and to assess a possible correlation between glycemic control (HbA1c), TPOAb positivity and structural changes. The study included 150 DM1 patients, 76 male (50,7%) with an average age of 34 years (18–61) who have had DM1 for 14,14 years (1–43), with a BMI 24,58 Kg/m2 (17,3­39). TPOAb, TSH, HbA1c were determined and a thyroid sonography was performed in a unique scanner by the same operator. In 6 patients it was not possible to obtain TPOAb, those were excluded from further analysis. TPOAb was positive in 33 (22,9%) patients. Prevalence of TPOAb was significantly higher in women (31% vs 15,1%; p=0,029) but was not related to patient age, BMI, HbA1c and longstanding DM1. Hypoechogenicity, heterogeneity, abnormal volume, pseudonodular and micronodular hypoechoic infiltration were associated significantly with TPOAb positivity (p8.0 ng/dl and free T3 of >30.0 pg/ml. RAI uptake and scan showed diffuse increased radiotracer uptake. Thyroid ultrasonography revealed a homogeneous parenchyma with hyperemia. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease and treated with methimazole. As her thyroid function tests improved over the course of the hospital stay, her psychotic features progressively subsided. The patient was subsequently readmitted twice with similar symptoms despite improved thyroid function tests. She was considered psychosis NOS ­ bipolar disorder with psychotic features. It appeared that thyrotoxicosis may have been a major precipitant for the initial acute psychotic episode. Thyrotoxicosis has been described both as a cause of organic psychosis as well as a precipitant of underlying affective psychosis. More severe psychiatric features have been described in patients with Graves' disease and toxic goiter. These may aggravate an underlying tendency to major psychiatric diseases in some patients. The mechanism of cognitive and behavioral dysfunction in hyperthyroidism is unknown. Symptoms often remit with successful therapy of the hyperthyroid state. However, acute changes in thyroid levels can precipitate psychoses. Residual mental illness may persist as seen in this case. Patients with abrupt or unusual onset and manifestations of psychotic symptoms should be screened for underlying or concomitant thyrotoxicosis.

Poster 540 Disorders of Thyroid Function Wednesday & Thursday Poster 9:00 AM A RARE CASE OF PROPYLTHIOURACIL INDUCED SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS H. Anaedo, S. Clark Endocrinology, Albany medical center, Albany, NY Propylthiouracil (PTU) induced sensorineural hearing loss and its association with ANCA­ small vessel vasculitis has been rarely described. We report a 56 yo F who has known Graves' disease initially on methimazole, but was discontinued due to severe rash and switched to PTU.Unfortunately 1 week after starting PTU she noticed acute hearing loss in her left ear, which started with tinnitus and then muffling in that ear with progression to her right ear. She was seen by audiologist, as well as ENT who confirmed sensorineural hearing loss on the left ear. She was tried on low dose prednisone without much improvement in her symptoms, MRI brain negative for intracranial lesion or possible etiology for her hearing loss. Her PTU was discontinued and she was planned for thyroidectomy for treatment of her Graves disease. Her symptoms improved on discontinuation of PTU and after thyroidectomy. PTU has been linked to MPO­ANCA­associated small­vessel vasculitis but very rarely to sensorineural hearing loss. Suggested mechanism includes dysfunction of outer hair cells of the organ of Corti from Inner ear blood flow impairment from ANCA­ small­vessel vasculitis. This mechanism was proposed in the three case reports so far in the literature and they described associated athralgia and fever.Our patient had classic athralgia,weakness and headache

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

263/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

with the hearing loss which improved on stopping the PTU.MRI brain was obtained to rule out possible causes including menigioma,acoustic neuroma and multiple sclerosis.She did not have any history of ear trauma or presbycusis. Given that symptoms started shortly after starting PTU and improved after stopping it, we were confident that it was the cause of the sensorineural hearing loss.The exact etiology of the sensoriloss is not clear but the MPO­ ANCA small vasculitis is a plausible explaination and should be considered in all patients with simillar symptoms. PTU can cause sensorineural hearing loss and this awareness should trigger a MPO­ANCA testing and discontinuation of the medication with trial of high dose steroid.This is the first case reported in our population to the best of our knowledge.More case reports and studies are needed to collaborate our finding.

Poster 541 Disorders of Thyroid Function Wednesday & Thursday Poster 9:00 AM HYPERTHYROIDISM FOLLOWED BY WORSENING PRIMARY HYPOTHYROIDISM IN A PATIENT TREATED WITH IPILIMUMAB AND PEMBROLIZUMAB Z. Batacchi, L. Alarcon­Casas Wright Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Nutrition, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Ipilimumab and Pembrolizumab are immunostimulatory agents used to treat metastatic melanoma. Ipilimumab is a monoclonal antibody which binds to the cytotoxic T­lymphocyte associated antigen 4 (CTLA­4 ) and Pembrolizumab is a monoclonal antibody which inhibits programmed cell death­1 (PD­1) activity by binding to the PD­1 receptor on T­ cells. Thyroid dysfunction may ensue as immune­related adverse effects of these medications. 55 year old man with a history of metastatic scalp melanoma, type 2 diabetes mellitus and primary hypothyroidism diagnosed 6 years ago with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies. He had been stable on the same dose of levothyroxine 75mcg daily since diagnosis. Ipilimumab was commenced for treatment of melanoma. Prior to the first dose, TSH was 4.597 (0.400–5.00microIU/mL) and total T4 was 8.0 (4.8–10.8mcg/dL). Three of four planned doses of Ipilimumab were given before he developed headache and fatigue. Investigations revealed hypophysitis (central adrenal insufficiency, central hypogonadism) and hyperthyroidism. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enlarged pituitary gland compared to prior exams. TSH was low on 2 occasions with elevated total T4 and Free T4 on two occasions. Ipilimumab was discontinued and within 3 weeks, his thyroid function tests improved: TSH 0.554 (0.400–5.00microIU/mL) and total T4 of 10.7 (0.400–5.00microIU/mL). He continued levothyroxine 75mcg daily. Four months later Pembrolizumab was initiated. He has received 6 doses in the last 4 months. His TSH has reproducibly and progressively increased, most recently 20.353 (0.400–5.00microIU/mL), despite increasing the dose of levothyroxine. The case describes a patient with baseline primary hypothyroidism who developed opposing effects in thyroid function after consecutive use of the immune check­point inhibitors Ipilimumab and Pembrolizumab. Individually, the immune­ related adverse effects of these drugs upon the thyroid are uncommon and, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported as sequential effects in one patient. This underscores the importance of close monitoring of thyroid function during treatment with these agents.

Poster 542 Autoimmunity Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM SINGLE CENTRE EXPERIENCE OF CONSECUTIVE THYROTOXIC PERIODIC PARALYSIS (TPP) CASE SERIES N. Jauhar, S. Dissanayake, R. Srinivasa, V. Sonawane, B. Varadarajan Endocrine, Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore, Singapore TPP is an unusual manifestation of thyrotoxicosis with increased predilection to men of Chinese and south­east asian descent. We present a case series of consecutive TPP in our centre to evaluate demographics, pattern of presentation, etiology and response to treatment. We looked at 11 cases with a discharge diagnosis of TPP over a 2 year period. Demographics: Age 37±9 years (mean±SD), 91% males, 64% Chinese, 27% Malays and 9% Fillipino origin. For 91% thyrotoxicosis and paralysis were simultaneously diagnosed. 27% recalled previous episodes of self­limiting weakness. Presentation: 36% had a known precipitant (exercise and carbohydrate rich meal in 18% each). The majority (82%) had their weakness onset in late evening or early morning (55% between midnight and 6 am and 27% between 6pm and midnight). The weakness was painful in 27%, 73% had solely lower limb weakness and 27% had weakness of all 4 limbs. The mean leg muscle power was 2.1/5 (range 1–4) and arm 3.7/5 (range 1−5). Proximal weakness was more marked than distal in all patients. 91% had depressed reflexes. Potassium: Mean level at presentation 2±0.6mmol/l (100), TSH 0.006±0.001mIU/l (0.05), additionally analysis showed lower probability of treatment success in patients with anti­thyroid drugs (P90 mcg iodine per day is the current recommendation. Upon transition to cow's milk, the iodine content of 88 mcg/8 oz continues to provide RDA. As non­dairy milk does not contain iodine, this source of iodine is not present in a toddler who follows a vegan diet. Conclusions: Iodine insufficiency has been recognized in women of childbearing age following vegan diets, thus prompting recommendations for supplementation during pregnancy and lactation. This case highlights the risk for iodine deficiency in children transitioned to vegan diets after discontinuation of breast/formula feeding and the need for continuing iodine supplementation.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

282/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Poster 578 Iodine Uptake & Metabolism Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM BARIATRIC SURGERY REDUCES URINARY IODINE LEVELS­ A PROSPECTIVE 10­YEAR­REPORT FROM THE SWEDISH OBESITY SUBJECT (SOS) STUDY S. Manousou2,4, L. Carlsson2, R. Eggertsen2,3, L. Hulthén2, K. Landin­Wilhelmsen1,2, P. Jacobson1,2, L. Sjöström2, P. Svensson2, H. Filipsson Nyström1,2 1Deparmtent of Endocrinology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden 2Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden 3Mölnlycke Health Care Center, Mölnlycke, Sweden 4Department of Medicine, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden

Iodine is essential for the thyroid metabolism. Iodine deficiency may be a risk of bariatric surgery (BS). The hypothesis was that patients undergoing gastric by­pass surgery (GBP) suffer from iodine malabsorption, whereas vertical banded gastroplasty patients (VBG) with an intact gastro­intestinal tract do not. Both groups may have reduced dietary iodine intake compared to obese non­surgery patients (OB). From the Swedish Obesity Subject (SOS) study, a non­randomized prospective study of obese patients 1987–2000, 188 GBP patients were retrieved and matched to 188 VBG and 188 OB patients. 24h­urinary iodine excretion (24­ UIE), thyrotropin (TSH) and information on intake of iodine containing products were collected at baseline and after 2 and/or 10 years. These groups were compared to matched non­obese population based controls (non­OB) (n=188) (the WHO MONICA project). After 10 years, BMI had decreased in GBP and VBG from mean 43.7 and 43.3 to 33.2 and 36.2 kg/m2, respectively. BMI was stable in OB 42.0 to 41.8 kg/m2 and non­OB 25.2 to 27.0 kg/m2. Median 24­UIE was similar at baseline in GBP, VGP and OB (214, 201 and 203 μg) and did not differ after 2 years. After 10 years, 24­UIE in GBP, VBG and non­OB was similar (160, 149 and 142 μg) and was lower than in OB controls 189 μg, p5cm). Patient A is a 35­year­old male with a 3 year history of a mass in the anterior region of the neck, with no sign of discomfort besides the visible mass; on physical exam thyroid gland was normal with no enlarged cervical lymph nodes. He underwent Sistrunk procedure without preoperative fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA); postoperative histology was consistent with metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma. Total thyroidectomy was performed, histology yielded Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Patient B is a 25­year­old male with a 1­year history of an anterior neck mass, also with no signs of discomfort other than a visible mass. The thyroid glands were normal and no palpable cervical lymph nodes on physical examination. Thyroid function tests were normal. Preoperative FNA biopsy was compatible with thyroglossal duct cyst. He underwent removal of the cyst (not Sistrunk procedure) and had recurrence of the enlarging anterior neck mass. Subsequently, underwent Sistrunk surgical procedure by ENT team, histology report was consistent with papillary thyroid carcinoma. A total thyroidectomy was performed and histological post­operative report was negative for cancer. Considering patients' young age and clinical presentation, radioactive iodine (I­131) therapy was performed along with thyroid hormone suppressive therapy. Management for TGDC carcinoma is based on case reports. New treatment algorithms are based on small case reports. Removal of the thyroid gland allows for long­term monitoring of thyroglobulin levels and the use of I131 scintigraphy and I131 ablation therapy. We suggest the creation of a network of investigators to understand the true prevalence, risk factors and treatment outcomes of TGDC.

Information about Downloading

View larger version (142K)

Poster 623 Thyroid Cancer Wednesday & Thursday Poster 9:00 AM RARE CASE OF THYROID LYMPHOMA A. Somasundaram1, L. Bischoff2, M. Shirodkar1 1Endocrinology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA 2Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN

Primary thyroid lymphoma is a rare cause of thyroid malignancy with an estimated annual incidence of 2 per 1 million1. We describe a diffuse large B cell lymphoma of the thyroid presenting as a rapidly enlarging goiter and lymphadenopathy. An 85­year­old Caucasian female presented with an enlarging neck mass and difficulty breathing for two months. There was no history of thyroid disease or risk factors for thyroid malignancy. Review of symptoms was positive for fatigue and hoarseness. Physical exam revealed bilateral large, firm, masses of the neck. Her TSH was 8.25 (0.4–4.5 mIU/L) thyroid peroxidase antibodies were negative. Levothyroxine 25 mcg daily was initiated. Thyroid ultrasound confirmed enlargement of both lobes (Left 8.6×2.9×3.9 cm and right 7×4.4×4×4 cm) multiple nodules of mixed attenuation, favoring Hashimoto's thyroiditis. FNA of the left nodular area was predominantly lymphoid cells, atypical lymphocytes, and Hurthle cells with atypia. CT of the neck showed thyroid enlargement, without tracheal compression, scattered cervical lymph nodes, a left 1.2 × 1 cm level IIA lymph node with medial displacement of the left vocal cord. A repeat FNA with flow cytometry was suspicious for lambda monoclonal B cell population. Serum immuno electrophoresis was normal. She underwent a left lobectomy for progressive compressive symptoms. The frozen section was positive for lymphoma and final pathology confirmed diffuse large B cell lymphoma of thyroid. Staging PET CT revealed involvement of thyroid, bone marrow and lymph nodes. Chemotherapy with Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Vincristine and prednisone was initiated. Primary thyroid lymphoma should be suspected in an enlarging goiter with compressive symptoms. Accurate diagnosis is essential to provide the correct treatment. A rapidly enlarging goiter with compressive symptoms is a unique presentation of primary thyroid lymphoma.

Poster 624 Thyroid Cancer Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM DISPARITIES IN THE TREATMENT AND SURVIVAL IN MEDULLARY THYROID CANCER, SEER 1998–2011 A. Roche1, S.A. Fedewa2, A.Y. Chen1 1Otolaryngology ­ Head and Neck Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 2Epidemiology, Emory University School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA

Medullary thyroid cancer is a relatively rare neoplasm of the thyroid but accounts for 14% of thyroid cancer related deaths. Female sex, young age at presentation, and stage at presentation have been found to predict survival. Factors related to socioeconomic status, race and ethnicity have been less well described. Data for patients with medullary thyroid cancer from 1998 to 2011 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) registry were examined. Differences in receipt of thyroidectomy and lymph node examination by

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

304/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

race/ethnicity were examined using logistic regression models. Overall (OS) and Disease­Specific (DS) survival were examined by race/ethnicity using Kaplan Meier survival curves. 1647 patients were included in the analytic cohort (72.37% white, 8.44% black, 13.48% Hispanic, and 5.70% Other). 93% of patients received surgical treatment for MTC. There were no differences in receipt of thyroidectomy by race/ethnicity, however, black patients (OR=0.61, CI 0.39%–0.93%) were less likely to undergo lymph node examination compared to Non­Hispanic white and male patients. Black and Hispanic patients had lower overall (HR=2.40, 95%CI; HR=1.81, 95%CI, respectively) and disease­specific survival (HR=2.85, 95%CI; HR=1.24, 95%CI, respectively) when compared to Non­Hispanic White patients in adjusted analyses. Our study is the first population­based cohort of patients with medullary thyroid cancer to observe that Black race was associated with thyroidectomy alone, without receipt of lymph node examination as well as overall survival, and disease specific survival. Racial disparities exist in the type of treatment as well as outcomes in patients with medullary thyroid cancer.

Poster 625 Thyroid Cancer Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER IN CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE: A REFERRAL CENTER EXPERIENCE J. Dora, R.S. Scheffel, A.L. Maia Endocrine Division, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) in children and adolescents is an uncommon occurrence and the most adequate treatment approach and surveillance strategy for this group of patients is a matter of debate. Here, we aimed to describe the clinical presentation and outcomes of children and adolescents with DTC followed at our institution. DTC patients 18 years­old or younger at diagnosis were selected from a cohort of 880 DTC patients attending the Thyroid Clinic of a university­based hospital. Baseline clinical and oncological characteristics, interventions, disease status and outcomes are described. A group of 30 children and adolescents with DTC were included. The mean age at diagnosis was 14.6±3.3yrs, and 25 (83.3%) were female. Twenty­nine (96.7%) patients had papillary thyroid carcinoma histology, with a median tumor size of 2.2 cm (P25–75 1.7–3.5), cervical metastasis occurred in 19 (63.3%) and distant lung metastasis in 4 (13.3%). Twenty­six (86.7%) patients were in stage I and 4 (13.3%) in stage II (TNM staging). All patients underwent total thyroidectomy and twenty­seven (90.0%) received radioactive iodine therapy, with a median dose of 100 mCi (P25–75 100–150). After a median follow­up of 5.0yrs (P25–75 3.0­9.8), 15 (62.5%) were disease free, 5 (20.8%) had persistent biochemical and 4 (16.7%) structural disease. Interestingly, the post­operative stimulated thyroglobulin (sTg) cut­off point of 12 ng/ml had a sensitivity of 100% to predict disease free status on long term follow­up (area under the receiver operation characteristic curve 0.98, P18ng/ ml in men. When positive, genetic study of the RET proto­oncogene was requested. In two patients hypercalcitoninemia was detected. In both, the WO­CT was >36ng/ml and MTC was confirmed by histology (Stage I and III). The genetic study was positive in one patient (Exon 14­Val804Met­ Familial MTC). In the other patient polymorphisms (Exon 13 and exon 15, L769L and S904S, heterozygous) was detected. In both cases Calcitonin has remained normal since surgery. The results of this study confirm that screening thyroid nodules with serum CT measurement allowed the diagnosis of

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts MTC at least in one patient, at stage I. The prevalence of MTC was of 0.3%. WO­CT was very useful to confirm the

314/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

diagnosis. RET positive finding in a patient with MTC permitted us to evaluate his family. The pre­surgical diagnosis allowed us to determine the surgical technique, which is a crucial decision for improving the prognosis of the disease.

Poster 647 Thyroid Cancer Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM INCIDENCE AND TIMING OF COMMON ADVERSE EVENTS IN LENVATINIB­TREATED PATIENTS WITH RADIOIODINE­REFRACTORY THYROID CANCER FROM THE SELECT TRIAL R. Haddad1, M. Schlumberger2, L. Wirth3, E. Sherman4, M.H. Shah5, B. Robinson6, C. Ductus7, A. Teng7, A. Gianoukakis8, S.I. SHERMAN9 1Head and Neck Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 2Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Gustave Roussy and University Paris­Sud, Paris, France 3Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 4Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 5Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH 6Kolling Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia 7Eisai Inc., Woodcliff Lake, NJ 8Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Harbor­UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA 9Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, Division of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas

MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Lenvatinib (LEN) is approved for radioiodine­refractory differentiated thyroid cancer based on the phase 3 SELECT trial. Nearly all patients (pts) had an adverse event (AEs, LEN vs placebo, respectively: any­grade, 100% vs 90%; grade 3, 72% vs 22%; grade 4, 12% vs 8%). We have previously reported an analysis of hypertension, management, and correlations with efficacy. Here we examine the 5 other most common LEN­emergent AEs in SELECT. Pts received LEN (24 mg/d; 28­d cycle) or placebo. AEs were reported per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Univariate analyses were performed for progression­free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS); variables with P6 months in 3 patients (1.2%). Comparing patients with hypoparathyroidism to those with normal parathyroid function, there were no differences in preoperative calcium levels. However, patients with hypoparathyroidism had significantly lower calcium (8.0 vs. 8.6, p65 years) patients (pts) compared with placebo (PB; hazard ratio 0.53; 95% confidence interval 0.31­0.91; P=0.020) using data from pts with radioiodine­refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR­DTC) from the phase 3 SELECT trial. Median OS for older and younger (≤65 years) pts, respectively, was: LEN, not reached in either age group; PB, 18.4 months and not reached. Median progression­free survival (PFS; months) for older and younger pts, respectively, was: LEN, 16.7 and 20.2; PB, 3.7 and 3.2. Here we identify additional factors that may have contributed to this finding. Pts with progressive RR­DTC stratified by region, prior VEGF­targeted therapy, and age, were randomized 2:1 to LEN or PB (younger: LEN, n=155; PB, n=81 and older: LEN, n=106; PB, n=50). The initial subgroup analysis of efficacy by age was prespecified; the current exploratory analyses further investigates additional factors that may have contributed to, or been associated with, the improvement in OS in pts aged >65 years. There was a significant correlation between PFS and OS in both age groups (P0.99). The sensitivity and negative predictive value were significantly higher for CNB ( 14;p=0.044 and 0.001) Diffuse microcalcifications in the thyroid gland show high prevalence of malignancy. Considering that thyroid cancer with diffuse microcalcifications commonly has multifocal tumor foci, intrathyroid lymphatic spread and cervical lymph node metastasis, total thyroidectomy may be the preferred for the management. Although both CNB and FNA demonstrate acceptable diagnostic accuracies, CNB may be preferred because it demonstrates a significantly higher sensitivity and NPV.

a. US image shows diffuse microcalcifications in the right thyroid gland and isthmus. b. Clusters of psammomma bodies (arrows) were present in the lymphatics, which indicate intrathyroid lymphatic spread of tumor. It was confirmed as the sclerosing variant of PTC. View larger version (138K)

c. Diffuse microcalcifications were noted throughout the right thyroid gland (arroheads).

d. Tumor emboli (arrows) with psammoma bodies (arrowheads) were noted in the lymphatics. Information about Downloading

Poster 797 Thyroid Imaging Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM ONCOCYTIC THYROID NODULES ARE A COMMON AETIOLOGY FOR INTENSELY 18F­ FLUORODEOXYGLUCOSE­AVID THYROID INCIDENTALOMAS D.A. Pattison1,2, C.A. Angel3, M. Bozin4, M.S. Hofman1,5, R.J. Hicks1,5 1Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia 2Department of Endocrinology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia 3Department of Anatomical Pathology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia 4Department of Surgical Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia 5Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia

Thyroid cancer is variably reported in 8–55% of thyroid incidentaloma (TI) detected by FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Pathologic misclassification (identification of incidental non­avid thyroid cancer and not attributing FDG­avidity to benign thyroid uptake) potentially explains this heterogeneity. Intense FDG uptake occurs in oncocytic tumours due to impairment of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I and consequent upregulation of glycolytic metabolism. Retrospective audit of 33009 scans between 2007 and 2013 identified 416 patients with FDG­avid TI (1.3%). Further evaluation was performed when clinically appropriate in the context of comorbid malignancy in 116 patients (38 cases of presumed FDG­avid malignancy). Of these, available surgical pathology (hemi or total thyroidectomy) for 24 FDG­ avid lesions (18 women, aged 28–80) underwent a detailed histopathologic (location, size, diagnosis, percentage oncocyte density [POD]) and PET/CT imaging (location, size, SUVmax) review performed by a head & neck oncologic pathologist and nuclear medicine physician. 3 of 15 (20%) presumed malignant FDG­avid TI were not malignant on histopathologic­imaging review. In 2 cases, benign TI were identified as the cause of FDG uptake whilst in 1 case the original pathologic diagnosis was revised. Final diagnosis in this surgical population was 13 malignant (oncocytic 6, PTC 6, MTC 1) and 11 benign (oncocytic 8, parathyroid adenoma, degenerate nodule & thyroiditis) lesions. 14 of 22 FDG­avid lesions demonstrated significant (>60%) oncocyte density. Median/range SUVmax of benign (11.3/[3.7–37]), malignant (5.5/[3.4–54]), oncocytic (12.1/[3.6–54]) and non­oncocytic (5.4/[3.4–42]) lesions were estimated. There was no correlation (r2=0.11) between POD and SUVmax. 5 patients in this cohort died after median follow­up of 56 months from index FDG PET/CT; there were no thyroid cancer related deaths. Oncocytic lesions may have very intense FDG uptake and are a common cause of FDG­avid TI. The incidence of FDG­ avid malignancy may be overestimated without careful histopathologic­imaging correlation. It is also critical to consider the prognosis of underlying malignancy when evaluating FDG­avid TI.

Example of intensely FDG­avid benign degenerate nodule with dystrophic calcification (inferiorly) and mildly avid papillary thyroid cancer (superiorly). Information about Downloading

View larger version (117K)

Poster 798

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

386/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Thyroid Imaging Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM IS THE REPRODUCIBILITY OF SHEAR WAVE ELASTOGRAPHY OF THYROID NODULES HIGH ENOUGH FOR CLINICAL USE? A METHODOLOGICAL STUDY K.Z. Rubeck1,2, S.J. Bonnema3, M. Jespersen4, P. Christiansen6, B. Bibby5, V.E. Nielsen1 1Department of oto rhino laryngology and head & neck surgery, Aarhus Universityhospital, Aarhus C, Denmark 2Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark 3Department of Endocrinology, Odense Universityhospital, Odense, Denmark 4Department of Pathology, Aarhus Universityhospital, Aarhus, Denmark 5Department of Biostatistics, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark 6Surgical Department P, Section of Breast­ and Endocrine Surgery, Aarhus Universityhospital, Aarhus, Denmark

Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) assesses tissue elasticity quantitatively (Elasticity Index, EI). A higher EI in malignant thyroid nodules has been reported, suggesting SWE as a potential tool for diagnosing thyroid malignancy. However, thyroid SWE needs to be further evaluated before clinical application is legitimate. Our aim was therefore to systematically assess the reproducibility of SWE, when applied to patients undergoing surgery for thyroid nodular disease. SWE examinations were performed pre­operatively in 52 patients [male/female: 13/39; mean age: 53 years (range 21–81); malignant/benign 13/39] referred to a tertiary thyroid center. Guided by at color­coded map, repeat registrations of EI in predefined regions of interest (ROIs) were performed for the index nodule by two independent investigators on the same day, and by one investigator on a different day. We assessed thyroid SWE reliability by calculating the inter­ and intraobserver variation along with the day­to­day variation. Results are presented as 95% limits of agreement, by which a variation of 0% indicates perfect concordance between observations. Independent measurements for mean EI of 10mm ROI showed an inter­observer variation of 95%, whereas the intra­ observer variation was 92% and 85% for the two observers, respectively. The day­to­day variation (n=40) was 176%. Using mean EI for a 3mm ROI, measurements showed an inter­observer variation of 164%, while the intra­ observer variation was 131% and 126% for the two observers, respectively. The day­to­day variation (n=40) was 243%. When comparing EI measurements of 10mm ROI, a systematic inter­observer difference of 18% (95%­CI: 9– 29%, p=0.0002) was registered, whereas no systematic difference was found for 3mm ROI (p=0.38). In this methodological study of thyroid SWE, we found a suboptimal observer agreement, as measured by the 10mm ROI, and the variation was even higher by a 3mm ROI. In addition, a high day­to­day variation of EI raises concern, and may invalidate this method as a reliable tool for discriminating malignant from benign thyroid nodules.

Poster 799 Thyroid Cancer Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM A NOVEL ROBOTIC SURGICAL TECHNIC FOR THYROID SURGERY ­ BILATERAL AXILLAR APPROACH (BAA J. Woo, S. Kim, I. Park, J. Choe, J. Kim, J. Kim Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of) Robot assisted thyroidectomy (RT) is proven as a feasible method for the treatment of well differentiated thyroid cancers in terms of oncology as well as cosmesis. Two approaching methods have been widely performing in Korea; Axillary approach (AA) and Bilateral Axillo­Breast Approach (BABA). Although each approach has its own merits, several limitations still exist. We suggest here a novel robotic surgical technic for thyroid surgery free from breast incision, bilateral axillar approach (BAA). Since October 2014, we have recruited patients willing to undergo the novel BAA robotic thyroid surgery after informed consents. The clinical data and quetionares were collected prospectively after approval of institutional review board. Total 36 patients underwent BAA robotic thyroid surgery. Mean age of the patients was 34.0 years. Thirty two patients were female, and 4 patients were male. Thirteen patients underwent total thyroidectomy, while 23 patients underwent ipsilateral thyroid lobectomy, and 35 patients underwent concomitant central lymph node dissection. Mean flap dissection time was 33.0 minutes, and mean ipsilateral console time was 64.1 minutes. Mean number of ipsilateral dissected lymph nodes were 2.7 lymph nodes. There were 2 cases of postoperative radioactive iodine ablation, and their stimulated thyroglobulin were both 0.1 ng/mL. There were 1 case of transient vocal cord paresis (1 event/nerves at risk), and 2 cases of transient hypoparathyroidism (postOP 1 day PTH≤5.0 cases/13 total thyroidectomy cases). There was no case of postoperative bleeding or chyle leak. Of 36 patents who had undergone BAA procedure, 12 patients answered the questionnaire. The scale, range from 0 to 10, at postoperative 1 day/2weeks are as follows: voice change score, 2.4/1.0; swallowing difficulty score, 4.2/0.7; anterior neck pain score, 5.5/4.0; anterior neck numbness score, 5.1/4.5; right chest pain score, 4.1/3.0; left chest pain score, 4.0/2/3; right chest numbness score, 2.9/1.0; and left chest numbness score, 2.6/2.3 respectively. BAA robotic thyroid surgery is a novel, safe and feasible oncoplastic method especially for patients who fear for breast nipple areolar incision.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts Poster 800

387/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Thyroid Imaging Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM A NOVEL GEL PAD LARYNGEAL ULTRASOUND (LUS) FOR VOCAL CORD EVALUATION J. Woo, S. Kim, I. Park, J. Choe, J. Kim, J. Kim Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of) Laryngeal ultrasound (LUS) is a recently developed method of vocal cord (VC) evaluation in patients with risk of vocal cord palsy (VCP). However, the LUS reportedly has high failure rate of VC visualization in male patients. We devised a novel gel pad LUS to improve the limitations. A total of 14 (5 male, 9 female) consecutive LUS and direct laryngoscopy (DL) exams were performed for thyroidectomy and other neck surgery patients. The conventional LUS, lateral­approach LUS, and gel pad LUS were used for all patients. Findings were independently cross­validated with DL. The conventional LUS, lateral­approach LUS, and gel pad LUS methods had 78.6%, 92.9%, and 100% visualization rate, respectively with an overall sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 100% for VCP. Among the 14 patients, 2 patients had VCP, and 5 patients had diffuse thyroid cartilage calcification interrupting LUS. With gel pad LUS, bilateral simultaneous visualizations of VC were possible in 3 male patients (21.4%) which was not feasible in conventional LUS. Compared to conventional LUS, new gel pad LUS method significantly enhances the visualization of VC in patients with diffuse thyroid cartilage calcification and enables the simultaneous bilateral VC evaluation in male patients, heightening the overall efficacy of LUS as a perioperative diagnostic tool for VCP.

Normal vocal cord (VC) and laryngeal ultrasound (LUS) view. (a) Normal VC. (b) Normal LUS view. All 3 VC landmarks (TC; true cord, FC; false cord, AR; arytenoid) are visible. (c) Diffuse calcification of thyroid cartilage. (d) Gel pad LUS view for calcified thyroid cartilage.

Poster 801 Thyroid Imaging Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM NONDIAGNOSTIC RATE OF CORE­NEEDLE BIOPSY AND ULTRASOUND­PATHOLOGY FEATURES OF THYROID NODULES WITH NONDIAGNOSTIC RESULTS S. Kim, D. Na Radiology, Human Medical Imaging & Intervention Center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of) The purpose of this study was to determine the nondiagnostic rate of core­needle biopsy (CNB) in thyroid nodules and to assess US and pathology features of nodules with nondiagnostic CNB results. From January 2010 to June 2014, we included 1302 consecutive data of CNB on thyroid nodules in a single institution. We calculated the nondiagnostic rate and analyzed US features and pathologic features of nodules with nondiagnostic CNB results. The pathology criteria for the “nondiagnostic” included normal thyroid tissue only, extra­thyroidal issue only, blood clots or fibrotic tissue only, and virtually acellular tissue. Sixteen (1.2%) of 1302 nodule were read as nondiagnostic CNB results, in which micronodules (100) issued from the database of radiology department of CHU Charleroi (Belgium) are evaluated using the previously described method for fractal dimension evaluation. Our first results stressed the importance of the size of the nodule image for the accuracy of the algorithm we developed for FD calculation.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts Therefore, the analysis was restricted to the adequate US nodules: surface >10 000 pixels2 and height >80 pixels.

390/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Running data seemed to confirm the results of the preliminary study. However, final conclusions will only be drawn in light of the analysis of the remaining images. Our preliminary work supported the hypothesis that FD could be an additional feature to discriminate benign from malignant nodules. This larger sampling will challenge the possible utilization of FD in the thyroid cancer diagnosis in clinical practice.

Poster 807 Thyroid Imaging Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM A PREOPERATIVE PET/MR IMAGING FOR ASSESSING PAPILLARY THYROID CARCINOMA J. Choi1,2, S. Lee1, J. Moon3, E. Kong2, Y. Byeon1, S. Kang1, J. Park1, K. Yeu1 1Department of Surgery, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of) 2Nuclear medicine, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of) 3internal medicine, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)

For preoperative evaluation of neck node status in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), ultrasound and neck CT has been generally used. This study evaluated the accuracy of a preoperative positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging for main mass and neck node status of PTC. Among 300 PTC patients who received preoperative PET/MR within 3 months prior to surgery from Aug 2012 to Oct 2013, 285 patients who underwent open thyroidectomy due to primary PTC were included. Through PET/MR, visual FDG uptake and morphologic abnormality including nodal shape, cortical thickness and loss of fat hilum of neck nodes were analyzed. All data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Mean age of patients was 48.5±11.4 year and mean tumor size was 0.9±0.6 cm. Total thyroidectomy and lobectomy was conducted in 78.2% (223/285) and 21.8% (62/285), respectively. All patients were underwent the evaluation for status of central neck node during surgery and additional evaluation for status of lateral neck node were conducted in 11.9% (34/285) of patients through selective sampling or modified radical neck dissection. In total, 36.1% (103/285) of patients had pathologic neck lymph node metastasis. PET/MR showed a high detection rate for main tumor of PTC (98.2%, 280/285). For detection of central neck nodes metastasis, PET/MR showed 68.8% accuracy (positive predictive value (PPV)=61.1%, negative predictive value (NPV)=70.6%) and for lateral neck nodes, 69.6% (PPV=72.2 and NPV=62.5%). PET/MR showed a higher accuracy for detecting neck node metastasis in 164 patients who were not suspected of clinical thyroiditis with positive thyroid antibodies or history of medical thyroid disease than total patients. For central neck nodes and lateral neck node, PET/MR had 75.0% and 73.2% accuracy, respectively. PET/MR imaging technique as preoperative evaluation of PTC seems to show a high accuracy in detecting main tumor. In detecting neck node metastasis, PET/MR imaging seems to show a higher accuracy in the patients without clinical thyroiditis than those with thyroiditis.

Poster 808 Thyroid Imaging Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM COEXISTING METASTATIC HURTHLE CELL THYROID CANCER AND LUNG CANCER WITH MARKEDLY DIFFERENT METABOLIC ACTIVITIES ON FDG PET/CT M.A. Muhleman, Z. Al­faham, D. Wu Nuclear Medicine, William Beuamont Health Systems, Royal Oak, MI FDG PET/CT has been increasingly utilized for restaging of metastatic thyroid cancers. Interpretation of PET/CT images could be challenging due to a wide range of FDG activities seen in different malignancies, and there is no cut­off standard uptake value (SUV) that could reliably separate benign versus malignant. The patient was a 70­year­old male with subtotal thyroidectomy on 10/15/2007 (left lobectomy and subtotal right lobectomy). Pathology revealed a 7 cm minimal invasive follicular thyroid cancer in the left lobe, Hurthle cell type, with capsular/vascular invasion, no extrathyroid extension, and no lymph node metastasis. On 11/26/2007, I­131 scan showed uptake in the right thyroid bed, for which he received 30 mCi of I­131 for ablation. We started to see this patient in 2013 due to rising thyroglobulin (Tg) and non­conclusive imaging studies. FDG PET/CT was performed on 07/09/2013, which revealed a known right upper lung nodule with minimal FDG activity (max SUV 0.7), stable since the prior PET/CT dated 10/10/2011 (max SUV 0.7). In contrast, there was a new 1­cm node in the left upper paratracheal region, with intense FDG activity, max SUV 39.7. On 07/26/2013, CT guided biopsy of the RUL nodule was positive for well­differentiated bronchogenic adenocarcinoma, while biopsy of multiple mediastinal nodes on 08/08/2013 was all negative. On 08/15/2013, right upper lung lobectomy was performed, and revealed a 2.7 cm primary pulmonary invasive moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Due to continue rising Tg, and positive repeat PET/CT, mediastinolomy was performed on 02/20/2014, which revealed a 1.6 cm left upper paratracheal node, positive for metastatic Hurthle cell carcinoma of thyroid origin. Since then, the patient had two followup CTs, both were unremarkable. Results from this case illustrate a huge different metabolic activity seen in primary lung cancer (max SUV 0.7) and metastatic Hurthle cell cancer of thyroid (max SUV 39.7). Results from this case illustrate a huge different metabolic activity seen in primary lung cancer (max SUV 0.7) and metastatic Hurthle cell cancer of thyroid (max SUV 39.7).

Representative PET/CT image showing a RUL nodule with minimal FDG activity (right lower panel) and intense FDG­avid left mediastinal node (right upper panel).

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

391/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Information about Downloading

View larger version (49K)

Poster 809 Thyroid Imaging Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM ULTRASONOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF WELL DIFFERENITED THYROID CARCINOMA (WDTC) AND PATHOLOGICAL CORRELATION: A STUDY OF 46 CASES FROM FARWANIYA HOSPITAL, KUWAIT N. Al­Brahim1, N. Taher1, S. Hebbar2 1Pathology, Farwaniya Hospital, Kuwait, Kuwait 2Diagnostic Radiology, Farwaniya Hospital, Kuwait, Kuwait

Ultrasound (US) imaging is a very useful, cost­effective diagnostic test for evaluating thyroid nodules. Despite the fact that there is no single ultrasongraphic feature that can predict malignant nodules, a collection of characteristics can help in achieving this. Therefore, ultrasonographers should be aware of these features and include them in the report. This study was conducted to assess completeness of thyroid ultrasound reports, common sonographic features in WDTC and correlation of these features with pathological characteristics of the nodules. Cases of thyroid cancer more than 1.0 cm in size and diagnosed between 2006 and 2013 were retrieved from the electronic files of the Department of Pathology, Farwaniya Hospital. Pathology reports and histological slides were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis and to identify prognostic factors. Cases with preoperative (US) performed in the hospital and reports available for review were included in the study. Nine features that were included in ATA guidelines that help predicting in malignancy were identified. Fourty­six cases had US performed in the hospital and included in the study, 33 cases were female (71.7%) and patients' age ranged 23­65. Ten reports out of 46 (21.7%) included ≥6 features, 25 reports (54.3%) included 4­5 features and 11 (24%) reports included ≤3 features in the report. The most common features commented on were lymph nodes (46/46), increased nodular vascularity (41/46) and solid vs cystic nodule (32/46). The least features commented on were halo sign (4/46) and hypoechogenecity (15/46). Increase intranodular vascularity and calcification are the most common features seen in WDTC and seen in (53.6%) and (45.4%) reported cases respectively. Papillary carcinoma was seen in all cases. Analysis of sonographic reports of WDTC revealed high percentage of uncompleted reports. There was no correlation between sonographic features and pathological features in our series.

Poster 810 Thyroid Cancer Wednesday & Thursday Poster 9:00 AM CAVERNOUS SINUS METASTASIS FROM CRIBRIFORM PAPILLARY THYROID CARCINOMA A. Lowenstein1, A. Reyes1, L. Fernando1, A. Colobraro1, M. Monteros Alvi2, A. De los Rios2, V. Concilio1, A. Rogozinski1 1Hospital JM Ramos Mejia, Buenos Aires, Argentina 2Hospital Dr A. Oñativia, Salta, Argentina

Distant metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma (PC) is rare and usually occur synchronously. There are few reports of cavernous sinus (CS) metastasis. The cribriform variant from PC may be sporadic or associated to familial colonic polyposis. We present a clinical case, with a history of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), and a methacronous metastasis to cavernous sinus. A 61 year old male, who lives in an endemic area (Salta), complains of headache and bilateral ptosis. Four years before (2008), he had had a history of thyroidectomy and left lateral cervical dissection. Histology: Left lobe: 2 cm PC cribriform variant with extrathyroid invasion. Right lobe: 5 cm follicular thyroid carcinoma 2/ 4 nodes metastasis tall cell PC. Ablation: 150 mci 131I. WBS neck positive. E IVa (AJCC 7th ed). Two years later (2010) with THW:TSH 41 uUI/ml, Tg1 cm were at older physical and metabolic age and had greater waist circumference, waist­to­hip ratio and visceral fat compared with those harbouring nodules≤1 cm. The prevalence of NTD in overweight or obese subjects was higher than in normal­weight participants (65.1% vs. 34.9%, respectively, p0.05). Ca and P blood levels, and product Ca.P evolved in a similar way, in the three forms of taking CaCO3.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

406/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Poster 841 Thyroid Nodules & Goiter Wednesday & Thursday Poster 9:00 AM BIOCHEMICAL FOLLOW UP OF NON­FUNCTIONING THYROID NODULES: INCIDENCE OF DEVELOPING THYROID DYSFUNCTION OVER TIME Y. Mohtasebi, S.R. Salgado Nunez del Prado, C. Overby, S. Stein, E. Lamos, K. Munir Endocrinology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD Thyroid nodules are a common clinical problem; with an estimated prevalence of 19–68% by ultrasound(US). In case of a benign nodule, periodic long life measurement of TSH has been recommended by some authors to rule out the development of toxic nodule over time. The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the incidence of thyroid dysfunction over time in patients with thyroid nodule/s who had normal TSH at diagnosis. Medical records of the patients with diagnosis of thyroid nodule/s between 1/1/2011­8/8/2014 were reviewed. Patients with abnormal TSH at diagnosis, on anti­thyroid or levothyroxine therapy, malignancy, history of head/neck radiation, any exposure to interferon­α, lithium or amiodarone, glucocorticoid exposure>3 months, age>89 and those with incomplete data were excluded. Patients who had TSH measurement within 1 year of initial US were included. Follow­up was the time period from initial/first available TSH and last recorded TSH in the chart. 564 patients with thyroid nodule/s were identified. 403 were excluded. 94 patients met inclusion criteria. Another 67 patients without TSH at diagnosis who had normal first available TSH were also included as a separate group. Mean follow­up was 4.1±1.7 yrs. 7/161 (4.3%) developed thyroid dysfunction. 2/7 developed hypothyroidism and 5/7 developed subclinical hyperthyroidism (SH). Of these 7 patients, only 1 patient had TSH measurement at diagnosis. Mean initial TSH level in patients who developed SH was 0.6 mcIU/mL and it eventually normalized in 3/5 patients with no intervention. Time to thyroid dysfunction in 5 patients with SH was 3.3±2.3 yrs. None of the 94 patients with initial TSH>1mcIU/mL developed abnormal TSH at F/U. Almost all patients with thyroid nodule/s who were biochemically euthyroid did not develop thyroid dysfunction after 4.1 years of average follow­up. Therefore, frequent TSH measurement in these patients is most likely unnecessary, particularly if initial TSH level is >1mcIU/mL.

Poster 842 Thyroid Nodules & Goiter Wednesday & Thursday Poster 9:00 AM ELASTOGRAPHY FOR THE EVALUATION OF THYROID NODULES IN CHILDREN A.N. Cury1, L.I. Marino2, C. Kochi2, O. Monte2, C.A. Longui2, E.C. Fleury3 1Medicine ­ Endocrinology, Santa Casa Medical Faculty, Sao Paulo, Brazil 2Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Santa Casa of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil 3Radiology Departament, Santa Casa of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

Thyroid nodules (TNs) are rare in children, with an incidence rate of only 1.5%. However, the risk of malignancy among children with TNs is high, reaching a quarter. Elastography is a new technique that uses ultrasound to provide an estimation of tissue stiffness by measuring the degree of distortion under the application of an external force. Stiffness is usually correlated with malignancy because benign lesions are supposed to be softer. We found no studies in the literature on elastography in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer in childhood. We enrolled 32 patients with a total of 38 thyroid nodules in our study. We collected TSH, free T4 and calcitonin; performed USG, elastography and FNA cytology by the same operator, when necessary. Thyroidectomy was recommended for patients who had possible non­benign cytology, TNs classified as Bethesda (Bt) IV, V, or VI. In this study, elastography was evaluated using 2 scores, namely E1 and E2. Every TN was given a score of E1 or E2. If the TNs had a red coloring of 50% of the thyroid nodule then it was classified as E2 (hard TNs). The mean age of patients was 12.9 years (range, 6–18 years) and the female: male ratio was 2.5. FNAB was done for all nodules (0.5–4.3cm). In the FNAB, 24 of the 38 TNs (63%) were classified as Bt II, 6 (16%) as Bt IV, 7 (18%) as Bt V, and 1 (3%) as Bt VI. Twelve of the 32 patients with cytological abnormalities concerning for cancer were referred for surgery. Overall, 7 patients were diagnosed with thyroid cancer, corresponding to a 22% cancer rate. High elasticity of a nodule on was associated with a low risk of thyroid cancer, if we consider that 24 TNs classified as benign after FNAB, 92% were classified E1. Only one malignant thyroid nodule was classified as elastography E1, and it was a particularly case of a boy with elevated calcitonin and final diagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma. In summary, it is easy to incorporate elastography in routine ultrasound examination and it can be used as a complementary screening test for children who present with TNs. Larger studies are needed to obtain the diagnostic accuracy of elastography in children.

Poster 843

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts

407/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

Thyroid Nodules & Goiter Wednesday & Thursday Poster 9:00 AM CORRELATION OF CLINICAL AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC FEATURES TO MALIGNANT DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH INDETERMINATE THYROID NODULES F. Murad, M. Anwar, M. Alshehri, R. Kholmatov, Z. Al­Qurayshi, E. Kandil Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA The management of thyroid nodules differ based on various clinicopathologic features. Various researchers have attempted to identify the preoperative risk factors which may indicate a malignancy. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether clinical symptoms, physical examination findings, and ultrasonographic features correlate with a malignant outcome in patients with indeterminate thyroid nodules. This is a retrospective review of our patients over a three years period, who were found to have atypia of undetermined significance (AUS), follicular lesion of undetermined significance (FLUS), or follicular neoplasm (or suspicious for follicular neoplasm) in a fine needle aspiration of a thyroid nodule, according to the Bethesda classification system. The age, gender, clinicopathologic features, and ultrasonography reports were reviewed and correlated with the final diagnosis in the surgical pathology report. Student's t test was used for the continuous variables, and Fisher's exact test was used for the categorical variables. Significance level was set as (α=0.05). Out of 307 nodules included in this study (67 in males, 240 in females) (age: 55.6±14.7), surgical pathology showed a malignant outcome in 100 cases (32.9%), a benign nodule in 141 (46.4%) and was not done in 63(20.8%). Asymptomatic patients with Internal vascularity and irregular margins on ultrasonography were more likely to have a malignant nodule (P3cm primary size, having metastatic disease, and receiving radiation. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that male race (OR=1.6; 95% CI 1.4–1.8), age 61–70 (OR=2.47, 95% CI 1.7–3.6), Medullary histology (OR=9.5, 95% CI 7.56–12.01), anaplastic histology (OR=94.1, 95% CI 77.2–114.7), metastatic disease (OR=2.93, 95% CI 2.45–3.50), and greater than 4 cm primary (OR=7.99, 95% CI 6.0–10.6). 51% of the patients receiving chemotherapy were treated at teaching research hospitals; 67% of the patients had primaries In spite of increasing number of indications for use of chemotherapy in the treatment of thyroid cancer, we did not find a significant trend from 2004–2012. We did demonstrate that clinical factors (size, histology, extent of disease) and non­clinical factors (sex and age) were associated with receipt of chemotherapy.

Poster 845 Thyroid Nodules & Goiter Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM INTEREST OF FINE NEEDLE ASPIRATION IN THYROID NODULES OVER THREE CENTIMETERS T. Raguin1, O. Schneegans3, J. Rodier2, E. Sauleau4, C. Debry1, J. Ghnassia6, A. Dupret­Bories5 1Service ORL et chirurgie cervico­facial, CHU Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France 2Service de chirurgie, Groupe Saint Vincent, Strasbourg, France 3Service d'endocrinologie et de médecine nucléaire, Centre Paul Strauss, Strasbourg, France 4santé publique, CHU Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France 5Service d'otorhinolaryngologie et chirurgie cervico­faciale., Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Toulouse, France 6Service d'anatomopathologie, Centre Paul Strauss, Strasbourg, France

In over half of the world population aged 60 years or older, thyroid nodules are detected either clinically or by imagery. The American Thyroid Association recommends a diagnostic examination with an ultrasound in association

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/thy.2015.29004.abstracts with a fine needle aspiration in case of a potential subcentimeter thyroid nodule. The risk of a mistake in the diagnosis

408/414

10/29/2015

15TH INTERNATIONAL THYROID CONGRESS PROGRAM AND MEETING ABSTRACTS

by fine needle aspiration combined with the increase in the prevalence of malignancy with nodules over three centimeters may compromise the interest of fine needle aspiration before surgery. This is a retrospective, monocentric study based on patients operated for a thyroid nodule over 3 centimeters between June 2004 and June 2014. The inclusion criteria were the size of the nodule, a fine needle aspiration coupled with an ultrasound measurement prior to surgery and a final postoperative histopathology. Of the 6393 patients who had thyroid surgery, 843 were included in this study. The average size of the nodules was 42.2 mm. The fine needle aspiration was informative in 42.6% of the cases (type II, V et VI of the Bethesda classification). The correlation between fine needle aspiration and the final postoperative histopathology analysis was 94.82% for benign nodules and 70.97% for malignant nodules. (Table 1) In our study, fine needle aspiration had a positive predictive value of 71%, a negative predictive value of 95%, a specificity of 97% and a sensitivity of 56% (with an error rate of 0.07). The risk of having a thyroid cancer is 44.72 times more important in case of malignancy fine needle aspiration rather than benign (Odds Ratio 44,72)(IC : 0.14–0.39). These results indicate that fine needle aspiration improves the diagnosis for nodules over 3 cm in only 42.6% of the cases, with a sensitivity of 56%. The fine needle aspiration should not delay surgical indication for thyroid nodules with a size greater than 3 centimeters.

Poster 846 Thyroid Nodules & Goiter Wednesday & Thursday Poster 9:00 AM LONG­TERM OUTCOME FOLLOWING LASER THERAPY OF BENIGN CYSTIC THYROID NODULES H. Døssing1, L. Hegedüs2, F.N. Bennedbæk3 1Oto­Rhin­Lanyngology and Neck Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark 2Endocrinology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark 3Endocrinology, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark

Laser therapy (LT) is a safe and effective procedure for inducing thyroid nodule necrosis and shrinkage. Here, our aim was to evaluate long­term efficacy of LT in patients with a predominantly cystic benign recurrent thyroid nodule. Eighty­seven euthyroid outpatients (21 men and 46 women; mean age: 48 years; range; 17–82) with a recurrent cytologically benign cystic (≥2ml cyst­volume) thyroid nodule causing local discomfort were assigned to LT. LT, using one laser fibre, was performed after complete cyst aspiration and under continuous ultrasound (US) ­guidance. The output power was 2.0–3.0 W, and mean delivered energy was 1305 J (range; 94–4392 J). Mean treatment duration was 569 sec. (range; 47–1545). 16 patients (14 within 6 months) had surgery after LT. All had benign histology. The mean follow­ up for the remaining 71 patients was 50 months (range; 12–134). Pressure symptoms and cosmetic complaints were evaluated on a visual analogue scale (0–10 cm). The overall mean nodule volume in the 71 patients decreased from 12.2 ml (range; 2.3–45.0) to 1.5 ml (range; 0.7­ 11.0) (p 1 L cloudy fluid with elevated triglyceride count. CT of the chest noted an 8 cm thyroid nodule with tracheal deviation. The patient improved with diuresis and inhaled steroids and was discharged home. He was readmitted four days later with dyspnea and peripheral edema. He was initially diuresed with some improvement, but three days later became hypoxic; 1.4 L chylous pleural fluid was removed via thoracentesis with improvement in his oxygenation. Ultrasound of the thyroid showed an 11 × 6.2 × 6.3 cm solid thyroid mass replacing much of the left lobe, with central vascularity and microcalcifications, and a smaller right­sided 1.8 × 1.6 × 1.9 cm thyroid nodule. Lymphangiogram showed opacification of the thoracic duct with abrupt cutoff in the upper mediastinum likely secondary to extrinsic mass effect from the large substernal goiter. He underwent left lobectomy with resolution of his chylous effusions. Pathology of the thyroid nodule was benign. On review of outside records, he was noted to have had a 6.1 cm thyroid nodule on CT chest performed in 2003, but never sought further evaluation due to financial issues. Typically, large thyroid masses cause compressive symptoms such as dysphagia, orthopnea, and hoarseness. It is important to remember that other local structures, such as the thoracic duct, may also be affected. Chylous effusions have been associated with both hyper­ and hypothyroidism, and are more commonly seen as a complication of mediastinal lymph node dissection for thyroid cancer. Bulky thyroid masses should be considered when evaluating the etiology of a recurrent chylous effusion.

Poster 849 Thyroid Nodules & Goiter Wednesday & Thursday Poster Clinical 9:00 AM J­131 THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH AUTONOMOUSLY FUNCTIONING THYROID NODULES WITH A NORMAL TSH LEVEL M. Lacic Polyclinic Lacic, Zagreb, Croatia In this study we evaluate the effect of J­131 therapy in patients (pts) with autonomously functioning thyroid nodules (AFTNs) and a normal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) value. Up to our knowledge, this is the first study which has scintigraphically evaluated the effect of J­131 therapy in patients with AFTNs and normal TSH level. During the last five years 43 cytological benign AFTNs in 40 pts (36 female and 4 male) with normal TSH level have been treated with a fixed J­131 doses (370 MBq). Clinical exam, ultrasonography with color Doppler (US), fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB), TSH, FT4, FT3, anti­TPO, anti­Tg and thyroid scan (scintigraphy) have been performed in all pts before J­131 therapy. After the J­131 therapy a careful clinical follow up of the patients has been done including: US, TSH, FT4, FT3, anti­TPO and anti­Tg measurements. A 6 month post J­131 therapy a thyroid scan has been performed in 27 pts with 30 AFTNs. The median age of the pts was 57 (range 37–83) years. AFTNs were located more frequently in the right thyroid lobe (25 nodules) than in the left lobe (18 nodules). In 10 pts a solitary AFTN has been found on ultrasonography and the other 30 patients had AFTNs in multinodular goiter. On post J­131 therapy thyroid scan in 25 AFTNs complete therapy effect has been observed, but in 5 AFTNs a scintigraphycally partial effect has been noted. Statistical analysis showed a significant reduction in the thyroid (p=1,8827E­12) and AFTNs (p=1,60185E­06) volume after J­131 therapy. TSH value significantly increased (p

Suggest Documents