CHAPTER 2 OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS

22 downloads 407 Views 2MB Size Report
❑Op amp circuits work at levels that are quite close to their predicted theoretical performance. .... Superposition technique for linear time-invariant circuit. 1. 1. 2. 1 .... ❑The analysis can be simplified by using the circuit model with an offset-free.

CHAPTER 2 OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS Chapter Outline 2.1   The Ideal Op Amp 2.2   The Inverting Configuration 2.3   The Noninverting Configuration 2.4   Difference Amplifiers 2.5   Integrators and Differentiators 2.6   DC Imperfections 2.7   Effect of Finite Open‐Loop Gain and Bandwidth on Circuit Performance 2.8   Large‐Signal Operation of Op Amp

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐1

2.1 Ideal Op Amp Introduction Their applications were initially in the area of analog computation and instrumentation Op amp is very popular because of its versatility Op amp circuits work at levels that are quite close to their predicted theoretical performance The op amp is treated a building block to study its terminal characteristics and its applications

Op‐amp symbol and terminals Two input terminals: inverting input terminal () and noninverting input terminal (+) One output terminal Two dc power supplies V + and V  Other terminals for frequency compensation and offset nulling Circuit symbol for op amp

Op amp with dc power supplies

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐2

Ideal characteristics of op amp Differential‐input single‐ended‐output amplifier Infinite input impedance  i1 = i2 = 0  (regardless of the input voltage) Zero output impedance vO= A(v2 – v1)  (regardless of the load) Infinite open‐loop differential gain Infinite common‐mode rejection Infinite bandwidth

Differential and common‐mode signals Two independent input signals: v1 and v2 Differential‐mode input signal (vId): vId = (v2 – v1) Common‐mode input signal (vIcm): vIcm = (v1 + v2)/2 Alternative expression of v1 and v2: v1 = vIcm – vId /2 v2 = vIcm + vId /2

Exercise 2.2 (Textbook) Exercise 2.3 (Textbook) NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐3

2.2 The Inverting Configuration The inverting close‐loop configuration External components R1 and R2 form a close loop Output is fed back to the inverting input terminal Input signal is applied from the inverting terminal

Inverting‐configuration using ideal op amp The required conditions to apply virtual short for op‐amp circuit:  Negative feedback configuration  Infinite open‐loop gain Closed‐loop gain: G ≡ vO /vI =  R2 /R1  Infinite differential gain: v2  v1 = vO /A = 0  Infinite input impedance: i2 = i1 = 0  Zero output impedance: vO = v1  i1 R2 =  vI R2 /R1  Voltage gain is negative Input and output signals are out of phase  Closed‐loop gain depends entirely on external passive  components (independent of op‐amp gain)  Close‐loop amplifier trades gain (high open‐loop gain)  for accuracy (finite but accurate closed‐loop gain)

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐4

Equivalent circuit model for the inverting configuration  Input impedance: Ri ≡vI /iI = vI / (vI /R1) = R1 For high input closed‐loop impedance, R1 should be large, but is limited to provide sufficient G In general, the inverting configuration suffers from a low input impedance  Output impedance: Ro = 0  Voltage gain: Avo = R2/R1

Other circuit example for inverting configuration

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐5

Application: the weighted summer A weighted summer using the inverting configuration

n

Rf

k 1

R1

vO  0  R f  ik  (

v1 

Rf R2

v2  ... 

Rf Rn

vn )

A weighted  summer for coefficients of both signs

R   R  R   R  R   Rc  vO  v1  a  c   v2  a  c   v3  c   v4    R1  Rb   R2  Rb   R4   R3 

Exercise 2.4 (Textbook) Exercise 2.6 (Textbook) Exercise 2.7 (Textbook) NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐6

2.3 Noninverting Configuration The noninverting close‐loop configuration External components R1 and R2 form a close loop Output is fed back to the inverting input terminal Input signal is applied from the noninverting terminal

Noninverting configuration using ideal op amp The required conditions to apply virtual short for op‐amp circuit:  Negative feedback configuration  Infinite open‐loop gain Closed‐loop gain: G ≡ vO /vI = 1 + R2 /R1  Infinite differential gain: v+  v = vO /A = 0  Infinite input impedance: i2 = i1 = v /R1  Zero output impedance: vO = v + i1R2 = vI (1 + R2 /R1)  Closed‐loop gain depends entirely on external passive  components (independent of op‐amp gain)  Close‐loop amplifier trades gain (high open‐loop gain)  for accuracy (finite but accurate closed‐loop gain) Equivalent circuit model for the noninverting configuration  Input impedance: Ri =   Output impedance: Ro = 0  Voltage gain: Avo = 1 + R2 /R1 NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

(1+R2/R1)vi

2‐7

The voltage follower Unity‐gain buffer based on noninverting configuration Equivalent voltage amplifier model:  Input resistance of the voltage follower Ri =   Output resistance of the voltage follower Ro = 0  Voltage gain of the voltage follower Avo = 1 The closed‐loop gain is unity regardless of source and load It is typically used as a buffer voltage amplifier to connect a source with a high impedance to a low‐ impedance load

Exercise 2.9 (Textbook)

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐8

Exercise 1: Assume the op amps are ideal, find the voltage gain (vo/vi) of the following  circuits. (1)                                                                            (2)

(3)                                                                            (4)

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐9

2.4 Difference Amplifiers Difference amplifier Ideal difference amplifier:  Responds to differential input signal vId  Rejects the common‐mode input signal vIcm Practical difference amplifier:  vO = AdvId + AcmvIcm Ad is the differential gain Acm is the common‐mode gain  Common‐mode rejection ratio (CMRR): CMRR  20 log

| Ad | | Acm |

Single op‐amp difference amplifier R4 v I 2  v R3  R4 v v  R 1  R2 / R1 vO  v  iR2  v    1  R2   2 vI 1  vI 2 R1 1  R3 / R4  R1  v 



R2 vIcm  vId / 2  1  R2 / R1 vIcm  vId / 2 R1 1  R3 / R4

 1  R2 / R1 R2  1  1  R2 / R1 R2     vIcm    vId  R R R  R R R1  1 / 2 1 / 3 4 1  3 4  

1  1  R2 / R1 R2    Ad   2  1  R3 / R4 R1 

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

 1  R2 / R1 R2    Acm    1  R3 / R4 R1 

2‐10

Superposition technique for linear time‐invariant circuit Set vI2 = 0 → vO1  ( R2 / R1 )vI 1  R  R4  vI 2 Set vI1 = 0 → vO 2  1  2   R1  R3  R4  R 1  R2 / R1 vO  vO1  vO 2   2 vI 1  vI 2 R1 1  R3 / R4

vI1 vO1

 1  R2 / R1 R2  1  1  R2 / R1 R2     vIcm    vId 2  1  R3 / R4 R1   1  R3 / R4 R1   1  1  R2 / R1 R2   1  R2 / R1 R2  CMRR  20 log     /     2  1  R3 / R4 R1   1  R3 / R4 R1  1  1  R2 / R1 R2    Ad   2  1  R3 / R4 R1 

 1  R2 / R1 R2    Acm    1  R3 / R4 R1 

vI2

vO2

The condition for difference amplifier operation: R2 /R1 = R4 /R3  vO = (R2 /R1)(v2  v1) For simplicity, the resistances can be chosen as: R3 = R1 and R4 = R2 Differential input resistance Rid:  Differential input resistance: Rid = 2R1  Large R1 can be used to increase Rid R2 becomes impractically large to maintain required gain Gain can be adjusted by changing R1 and R2 simultaneously NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐11

Instrumentation amplifier

Ad 

vO R  R   4 1  2  vI 2  vI 1 R3  R1 

Differential‐mode gain can be adjusted by tuning R1 Common‐mode gain is zero Input impedance is infinite Output impedance is zero It’s preferable to obtain all the required gain in the 1st stage, leaving the 2nd stage with a gain of one

Exercise 2.15 (Textbook) Exercise 2.17 (Textbook) NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐12

2.5 Integrators and Differentiators Inverting configuration with general impedance R1 and R2 in inverting configuration can be replaced by Z1(s) and Z2(s) The closed‐loop transfer function: Vo(s) /Vi(s) = Z2(s) /Z1(s) The transmission magnitude and phase for a sinusoid input  can be evaluated by replacing s with j

Inverting integrator Time domain analysis: t

vC (t )  VC 

t

1 1 vI (t ) ( ) i t dt  V  dt 1 C C 0 C 0 R t

vO (t )  vC (t )  

1 vI (t )dt  VC RC 0

Frequency domain analysis: Vo ( j ) 1 Z  2  Vi ( j ) Z1 jRC 1 Vo  Vi RC

 = 90

Also known as Miller integrator Integrator frequency (int) is the inverse of the integrator time‐constant (RC)  int = 1/RC The capacitor acts as an open‐circuit at dc ( = 0)  open‐loop configuration at dc (infinite gain) Any tiny dc in the input could result in output saturation NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐13

The Miller integrator with parallel feedback resistance To prevent integrator saturation due to infinite dc gain, parallel feedback resistance is included G (dB)

1 RF C

w (log scale) 1 RC

Vo ( j ) Z ( j ) 1  2   Vi ( j ) Z1 ( j ) R / RF  jRC

Closed‐loop gain = 1/(jRF + R/RF) Closed‐loop gain at dc = RF/R Closed‐loop gain at high frequency ( >>1/RFC) ≈ 1/ jRC Corner frequency (3dB frequency) = 1/RFC The integrator characteristics is no longer ideal Large resistance RF should be used for the feedback

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐14

The op‐amp differentiator Time domain analysis iC

dvI (t ) dt

vO (t )   RC

dvI (t ) dt

Frequency domain analysis Vo ( j ) Z   2   jRC Vi ( j ) Z1 Vo  RC Vi

 = 90

Differentiator operation:

Differentiator time‐constant: RC Gain (= RC) becomes infinite at very high frequencies High‐frequency noise is magnified (generally avoided in practice)

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐15

The differentiator with series resistance To prevent magnifying high‐frequency noise, series resistance RF is included G (dB)

w (log scale)

Vo ( j ) jRC  Vi ( j ) 1  jRF C

1 RC

1 RF C

Closed‐loop gain = jRC / (1 + jRFC) Closed‐loop gain at infinite frequency = R/RF Closed‐loop gain at low frequency (  1+ R2/R1 Input impedance: Ri 

vI vI vI R1    i1 (vI  vO / A0 ) / R1 (vI  vI G / A0 ) / R1 1  G / A0

Output impedance:  Ro  0

Inverting configuration using op amp with finite gain and bandwidth  R2 / R1  R2 / R1  1  (1  R2 / R1 ) / A( j ) 1  (1  R2 / R1 ) /A0 /(1  j / b )  R2 / R1  1  (1  R2 / R1 ) / A0   j (1  R2 / R1 ) / b A0 

G

if A0 >> 1+R2/R1  G ≈ G0 /(1+j/3dB) where G0 = R2/R1 and 3dB = A0b /(1+R2/R1) ≈ (A0 /|G0|)b

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐22

Exercise 3: Consider an inverting amplifier where the open‐loop gain and 3‐dB bandwidth  of the op amp are 10000 and 1 rad/s, respectively. Find the gain and bandwidth of the close‐ loop gain (exact and approximated values) for the following cases: R2/R1 =  1, 100, 200, and  2000. Exercise 4: An op amp has an open‐loop gain of 80 dB and a 3‐dB bandwidth of 10 rad/s. (1) The op amp is used in an inverting amplifier with R2/R1 = 100. Find the close‐loop gain  at dc and at  = 1000 rad/s. (2) Two identical inverting amplifiers with R2/R1 = 100 are cascaded. Find the close‐loop  gain at dc and at  = 1000 rad/s. (3) For the cascaded amplifier in (2), find the frequency at which the gain is 3 dB lower  than the dc gain. Exercise 2.26 (Textbook) Example 2.6 (Textbook) Exercise 2.27 (Textbook) Exercise 2.28 (Textbook)

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐23

2.8 Large‐Signal Operation of Op Amps Output voltage saturation Rated output voltage (vO,max) specifies the maximum output voltage swing of op amp Linear amplifier operation (for the required vO  vO,max): vO = vO,max The maximum input swing allowed for output voltage limited case: vI,max = vO,max/ (1+R2/R1) Output is typically limited by voltage in cases where RL is large

Output current limits Maximum output current (iO,max) specifies the output current limitation of op amp Linear amplifier operation (for the required iO  iO,max): iL = iO,max iF The maximum input swing allowed for output current limited case:                                                 vI,max = iO,max[RL||(R1+R2)]/(1+R2/R1) Output is typically limited by current in cases where RL is small

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐24

Slew rate dv

SR  O max Slew rate is the maximum rate of change possible at the output:                    (V/sec)  dt Slew rate may cause non‐linear distortion for large‐signal operation Input step function

Small‐signal distortion (finite BW)

Large‐signal distortion (SR)

vO (t )  V (1  e t t )

Full‐power bandwidth Defined as the highest frequency allowed for a unity‐gain buffer with a sinusoidal output at vO,max vi (t )  Vo sin t  vo (t )  Vo sin t

vO

dvo (t )  Vo cos t dt dv (t ) | o |max  Vo  SR  distortionless dt dv (t ) | o |max  Vo  SR  distortion dt  SR fM  M  2 2vO ,max

vO,max SR

w wM

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐25

Example 2.7 (Textbook) Exercise 2.29 (Textbook) Exercise 2.30 (Textbook)

NTUEE   Electronics   – L. H. Lu

2‐26