Chemistry Practice Interview Scenario

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be concerned if you run out of time before you get to ask all of the questions below. Important note: Before ... Interviewer Activity Form. Setting: As an ... Question Four: What do you think is the most exciting frontier in chemistry? Question Five: ...

Chemistry Practice Interview Scenario Instructions: Please keep in mind that this will be the most beneficial for you and your classmate the more you are “in character.” Feel free to take notes on this sheet. Do not be concerned if you run out of time before you get to ask all of the questions below. Important note: Before you get into character as the interviewer, please inform your classmate of the setting described below so that they are aware of the circumstances of their interview. Please do not share the “Interviewer Personality” or any of the interview questions in advance. Interviewer Activity Form Setting: As an Interviewer you are a Senior Recruiter for Pfizer, a premier biopharmaceutical company. You are interviewing a PhD candidate in Chemistry from Vanderbilt University for a position after graduation as a Principal Scientist. This individual will be responsible for working in a team environment, presenting to executives, and will lead and teach other staff as well as conduct and facilitate lab experimentation. Interviewer Personality: You are a Vanderbilt Alumnus who is very relaxed. You speak slowly (with pauses) and attempt to make the candidate comfortable when asking your questions. Question One: Must be stated the following way: Hello, I’m _____. How are you doing today? (please say nothing afterwards and wait for a response and/or handshake) Question Two: Tell me a bit about yourself. Question Three: What experience have you had at Vanderbilt that has allowed you to take on a leadership role? Have you ever worked in a team environment? If so, please provide an example. Question Four: What do you think is the most exciting frontier in chemistry? Question Five: Describe a time that your research did not produce impressive results. What criteria did you use to determine if and how you should continue on that particular path of research? Question Six: Have you ever had to teach another staff person or colleague a new system or skill? How did you do it?