Circulation

21 downloads 0 Views 159KB Size Report
Diana Menya, Jemima H Kamano, Thomas S Inui, Allison DeLong, Carol R Horowitz, Valentin Fuster, Rajesh Vedanthan. Circulation. 2015;132:A16831.

3/8/2017 Abstract 16831: Identifying Barriers to Hypertension Care: Development and Validation of a Behavioral Assessment Tool for Optimizing Linkage and Retent…

 

DONATE







Circulation Abstracts and presentations are embargoed for release at date and time of presentation or time of AHA/ASA news event. Failure to honor embargo policies (http://newsroom.heart.org/newsmedia/embargo­policy) will result in the abstract being withdrawn and barred from presentation. LIFESTYLE RISK FACTORS AND BEHAVIOR CHANGE SESSION TITLE: CULTURE OF HEALTH

Abstract 16831: Identifying Barriers to Hypertension Care: Development and Validation of a Behavioral Assessment Tool for Optimizing Linkage and Retention to Hypertension Care in Kenya (LARK Hypertension Study) Alexandra Douglas, Jackson Rotich, Peninah Kiptoo, Kennedy K Lagat, Kennedy Mutai, Emmanuel Tarus, Claire Kofler, Violet Naanyu, Diana Menya, Jemima H Kamano, Thomas S Inui, Allison DeLong, Carol R Horowitz, Valentin Fuster, Rajesh Vedanthan

Circulation. 2015;132:A16831

Article

 Info & Metrics

Jump to  Article  Info & Metrics  eLetters

Abstract Introduction: Hypertension is the leading risk factor for global mortality. Hypertension treatment rates are low, partly due to inadequate linkage and retention to care. The LARK Study evaluates the use of community health workers (CHWs), equipped with a behavioral assessment and a tailored behavioral change strategy, to improve linkage and retention to hypertension care in Kenya. Here we describe the development and validation of the assessment tool used by CHWs to identify patients’ barriers to care, facilitating behavioral change communication.

http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/132/Suppl_3/A16831

1/4

3/8/2017 Abstract 16831: Identifying Barriers to Hypertension Care: Development and Validation of a Behavioral Assessment Tool for Optimizing Linkage and Retent…

Methods: We derived behavioral assessment items from prior research on barriers to hypertension care in Kenya. Patients, CHWs, and clinicians scored each item for clarity and representativeness, and provided qualitative feedback during focus groups. A content validity index (CVI), representing inter­rater agreement of scores, was calculated for each item. Multivariable linear mixed­effects models were used to compare CVIs and level of modification (none, minor, major, or deleted) by participant category. Results: We tested 70 items in 9 focus groups. Mean CVIs were greater than 0.9 in all study groups (Table). Multivariable adjustment revealed that patients and CHWs had significantly higher CVIs than clinicians. Despite this, qualitative feedback from patients and CHWsled to higher item modification rates. 37 items were retained in the linkage assessment and 57 items in the retention assessment. Conclusions: The mean CVI was greater than 0.9 in all study populations, indicating excellent inter­rater agreement of the overall clarity and representativeness of assessment items. However, CVI alone could not account for modifications suggested during qualitative discussions. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods yielded the most informative evaluation of assessment items. These findings may be relevant to the validation of similar assessment tools in other low­resource settings.  

behavioral aspects

hypertension

international

Author Disclosures: A. Douglas: None. J. Rotich: None. P. Kiptoo: None. K.K. Lagat: None. K. Mutai: None. E. Tarus: None. C. Kofler: None. V. Naanyu: None. D. Menya: None. J.H. Kamano: None. T.S. Inui: None. A. DeLong: None. C.R. Horowitz: None. V. Fuster: None. R. Vedanthan: None. © 2015 by American Heart Association, Inc.

 Previous

 Back to top

This Issue Circulation November 10, 2015, Volume 132, Issue Suppl 3  Table of Contents

http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/132/Suppl_3/A16831

2/4

3/8/2017 Abstract 16831: Identifying Barriers to Hypertension Care: Development and Validation of a Behavioral Assessment Tool for Optimizing Linkage and Retent…  Previous

Article Tools 

Citation Tools



Article Alerts



Save to my folders



Request Permissions

Share this Article 

Email



Share on Social Media

Related Articles No related articles found.

Google Scholar

Cited By... No citing articles found.

CrossRef

Circulation About Circulation Instructions for Authors Circulation CME Statements and Guidelines Meeting Abstracts http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/132/Suppl_3/A16831

3/4

3/8/2017 Abstract 16831: Identifying Barriers to Hypertension Care: Development and Validation of a Behavioral Assessment Tool for Optimizing Linkage and Retent…

Meeting Abstracts Permissions Journal Policies Email Alerts Open Access Information AHA Journals RSS AHA Newsroom Editorial Office Address:  200 Fifth Avenue, Suite 1020  Waltham, MA 02451  email: [email protected]    Information for: Advertisers Subscribers Subscriber Help Institutions / Librarians Institutional Subscriptions FAQ International Users

National Center  7272 Greenville Ave.  Dallas, TX 75231 Customer Service 1­800­AHA­USA­1 1­800­242­8721 Local Info Contact Us

ABOUT US Our mission is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. That single purpose drives all we do. The need for our work is beyond question. Find Out More

Careers



SHOP



Latest Heart and Stroke News



AHA/ASA Media Newsroom



OUR SITES American Heart Association



American Stroke Association



http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/132/Suppl_3/A16831

4/4