Contact Lens Fitting Today: Silicone Hydrogels Part 1 ...

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Contact Lens Fitting Today: Silicone Hydrogels Part 1: Technological .... Part 1 - Material properties. ... Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2005;ARVO abstract #910. 47.

Contact Lens Fitting Today: Silicone Hydrogels Part 1: Technological developments By Lyndon Jones, PhD, FCOptom, DipCLP, DipOrth, FAAO (DipCL) and Kathy Dumbleton, MSc, MCOptom, FAAO References 1.

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