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May 21, 2013 ... (“2013 Plan of Work”) was published. This is a substantial overhaul of the RIBA Plan of Work, which was first published in 1963 and has since.

+ RIBA Plan of Work 2013 – A Step Forward for a 50 year old institution On 21 May 2013 the RIBA Plan of Work 2013 (“2013 Plan of Work”) was published. This is a substantial overhaul of the RIBA Plan of Work, which was first published in 1963 and has since underpinned the way in which the design process is structured across the construction industry. At first blush the changes made appear to be an important step forward in aligning the Plan of Work with modern practices and in promoting the use of Building Information Modelling. One two three not ABC The 2013 Plan of Work can be downloaded for free here. The most notable change to the RIBA Outline Plan of Work 2007 (“2007 Plan of Work”) is that the eleven traditional stages, A-L, have been replaced with eight new stages, numbered from 0-7. In addition, the descriptions of the key tasks in relation to each stage have been replaced with eight “task bars”. Whilst these changes appear substantial, the general approach taken in the 2007 Plan of Work has not been altered fundamentally. Although there have been some fairly significant changes (e.g. Stages G, H and J now form part of a Procurement toolbar), some of the Stages are largely unchanged (e.g. Stage 2 maps exactly to Stage C). The Overview published alongside the 2013 Plan of Work (available here) helpfully identifies how the new Stages relate to the old Stages, which should ease the transition somewhat.

A Flexible Approach The 2013 Plan of Work can be customised online and is intended to be adapted to suit the requirements of each particular project, or even each particular practice. For example, some of the task bars, (Procurement, Programme and (Town) Planning), can be varied and others, (Sustainability Checkpoints and UK Government Information Exchanges), can be switched on and off. This is a clear advantage to using the 2013 Plan of Work as it means it can easily be adapted to suit the applicable procurement method (including design and build and PFI), whereas the 2007 Plan of Work only aligned to the traditional method of procurement. This approach also enables the Plan of Work to provide for planning permission to be submitted at an early stage in the design process, or for a more detailed level of design to be carried out at an earlier stage.

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Key facts: On 21 May 2013 the RIBA Plan of Work 2013 was published The eleven traditional stages, A-L, have been replaced with eight new stages, numbered from 07 The descriptions of the key tasks in relation to each stage have been replaced with eight “task bars”

The 2013 Plan of Work can be customised online and is intended to be adapted to suit the requirements of each particular project, or even each particular practice

Related Documents The 2013 Plan of Work The Overview

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+ Building Information Modelling The UK government has declared that Building Information Modelling (“BIM”) will be used on all government procured projects by 2016 and the increased use of BIM appears to be the underlying driver for a number of changes in the 2013 Plan of Work. Although the RIBA BIM overlay to the 2007 Plan of Work published in May 2012 identified certain additional BIM specific tasks, the 2013 Plan of Work takes a further step forward by reconfiguring the design process to reflect the effect of using BIM and the benefits that can be derived from it. The most obvious example of this is the requirement in the 2013 Plan of Work for Information Exchanges at each Stage and optional UK Government Information Exchanges at particular stages. Although information will be exchanged on projects which don’t use BIM, this inclusion appears to arise from the need to exchange information regularly when BIM is used, for example so that clash detection can be carried out. Additionally, the new Stages align with a set of unified industry stages agreed through the CIC. This agreement was reached very much with BIM in mind given the need for industry wide standards as a result of the increased collaboration involved on a BIM project. They also reflect the fact that the use of BIM has resulted in construction being viewed as a much more cyclical process. Stage 0 (Strategic Definition) includes a review of “Feedback” from previous projects and Stage 7 (In Use) provides for a post occupancy evaluation and the continued updating of Project Information in response to “Feedback” from the Client until the end of the building’s life.

Key facts: The flexibility and adaptability of the new document should, alongside the CIC BIM Protocol, encourage further adoption off BIM

The Overview to the 2013 Plan of Work suggests that a number of supplementary documents are in the pipeline

The use of BIM has also identified the need for those involved in a project to agree what has to be produced at each particular stage. This is reflected in the RIBA Plan of Work 2013 Overview, which highlights the importance of agreeing the precise extent of information and, “crucially, the level of detail” and recommends the preparation of a Design Responsibility Matrix, to determine “who will produce what and when”. This very much reflects the approach we took in drafting the CIC BIM Protocol, published in March 2013, which requires Levels of Detail to be specified and the roles of each party to be identified in the Model Production and Delivery Table. The new Plan of Work also recommends the preparation of a Project Execution Plan at Stage 1, which identifies Technology and Communication Strategies and Common Standards for use by the project team. Again this reflects the need for common standards to be used on projects involving BIM to achieve consistency in the information which is produced, something which was also reflected in the CIC BIM Protocol (in particular in the Information Requirements). One further but potentially significant change in the 2013 Plan of Work is that it refers to the “project team” rather than the “design team” (a term which had been used since 1963). This underlines the need for all those producing or using designs to be involved in the design process on projects involving BIM. Again this ties in with the approach taken in the CIC BIM Protocol which is to be entered into by all members of the “Project Team”.

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+ What Next? The 2013 Plan of Work is a big step forward and very much reflects the modern requirements of the construction industry, particularly the effect of BIM on the design process. Although the industry may take time to digest the 2013 Plan of Work and may be reluctant to change 50 year old practices, the flexibility and adaptability of the new document should be a strong pull and the document, alongside the CIC BIM Protocol, should encourage the further adoption of BIM. Going forward, the Overview to the 2013 Plan of Work suggests that a number of supplementary documents are in the pipeline such as a Project Roles Table, a Contractual Tree, a Design Responsibility Matrix and Information Stages and a Project Execution Plan, all of which should further encourage the adoption of the 2013 Plan of Work. These documents are intended to be used as appendices to the RIBA appointment documents or a bespoke appointment, but it remains to be seen whether the RIBA will make any amendments to the appointment documents themselves to reflect the 2013 Plan of Work or the adoption of BIM. May 2013

For further information please contact John Henderson Partner T: +44 (0) 20 7240 3474 E: [email protected] Andrew Croft Solicitor T: +44 (0) 20 7240 3474 E: [email protected]

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