Games Good to the Core Games Good to the Core

19 downloads 257 Views 601KB Size Report
Module 2 – Designing Engaging Lessons with Games …… p.21. Module 3 ..... Take word documents, PowerPoint's, web pages, videos, pdf's, articles you write ..... Baby and JunoJr. Learn to play .... RPG Maker - http://www.rpgmakerweb.com /.

Games Good to the Core

Games Good to the Core – Course Pack Dr. Jeff Ertzberger Instructor

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.1

Important Information First

Web Site Address for Course: Regular Site: games4core.org Low Band-Width Site: http://people.uncw.edu/ertzbergerj/coreworkshop Discussion Board Address for Course: games4core.boardhost.com

Have a problem or question about course content: Email: [email protected] *Note – this contact information is only for course related questions, we are not able to help you with technical support on your computer. It is recommended you try accessing the site on another computer and or browser if you are having technical difficulties.

*Please note – for security purposes always use the same name and email address for all assignments that you used when you purchased the course pack.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.2

Table of Contents Introduction Module ………………………………………………..…..p.4 Module 1 – New Standards, New Resources …………….…. p.6 Module 2 – Designing Engaging Lessons with Games …… p.21 Module 3 – Demonstration and Application ………………...p.30

This course pack is a supplement to the online materials found in the online web pages for this course.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.3

Introduction What is this Course All About? Welcome – Thanks for purchasing the workshop course pack and enrolling in this course. Use the buttons at the top menu to begin your work in the course. You will begin with the introduction link. Basic Info Through this fully online course, participants will explore the use of games in classrooms to meet Common Core standards. Participants will see and be exposed to see best practices in the integration of technology and Common Core, and then be asked to create their own game enhanced lessons. Through asynchronous interaction, participants will discuss issues teachers face when attempting to teach with games and discuss and apply best practices. Participants will learn how to create games based lessons that apply best practice techniques to keep students engaged and on excited about learning. Through standardized module assessments participants will show their gaining knowledge of the topic. Course Objectives It is the goal of this course to provide the training and tools necessary for effective use of technology enhanced games in Common Core based instruction. This course is designed to provide participants with exposure to best practices in the use of games and provide easy to implement strategies to improve student engagement through game enhanced lessons. Objectives include: • • • • • • •

Identify goals of Common Core for Lesson Design Articulate why games based instruction is valuable for standards based lessons Identify best practices in games based instruction Identify current areas of major research in the use of games in education Identify various types of software available for producing educational games Learn how to modify pre-existing game templates Learn and demonstrate knowledge of how to design lessons that effectively implement game based strategies in the teaching of Common Core standards

What are the Assignments – When are they due? Due Dates All Assignments are due before June 15th, 2014 which is the final date the course will be open. Assignments can be turned in at any time during the course.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.4

Assignments and Feedback Each time you complete an assignment you will receive feedback. Look at the chart below to see what type of feedback. Module - Introduction: Assignment is to fill out the course registration information. Feedback will be an automatic response to the email address provided that the assignment was received and completed. Module 1 - Assignment is a discussion board post. In two to three sentences, reflect on the positive benefit of new standards, and share a little about what your school/district has done that has been helpful in working with the Common Core. Participants are also asked to list one book, web site, or other resource that they have found to be very helpful in working with the Common Core. Can be subject specific. Be sure to place your name in the body or subject line of the post. Module 2 - Assignment is a discussion board post. Feedback will be a reply to that post. In three or four sentences, describe one way you have used games in the past specifically relating to a subject or topic from your curriculum. If you have never used a game, what would you like to do in the future. Second, do you think teaching and learning with games has value in today's classroom? Be sure to post your name in the subject or body of the post. Module 3 - Assignment is to submit a lesson plan document and game through email to instructor. Feedback will be an email back to participate that will include certificate of completion once final assignment is satisfactory. How do I contact the instructor if I have a question about the course? Email: [email protected] *Note – this contact information is only for course related questions, we are not able to help you with technical support on your computer. It is recommended you try accessing the site on another computer and or browser if you are having technical difficulties.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.5

Module 1 New Standards – New Resources

Understanding the Common Core State Standards Mission Statement: (From the Common Core website – http://www.corestandards.org)

The Common Core State Standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them. The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers. With American students fully prepared for the future, our communities will be best positioned to compete successfully in the global economy. What is the Common Core State Standards Initiative? (From the Common Core website – http://www.corestandards.org)

“The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a state-led effort to establish a shared set of clear educational standards for English language arts and mathematics that states can voluntarily adopt. The standards have been informed by the best available evidence and the highest state standards across the country and globe and designed by a diverse group of teachers, experts, parents, and school administrators, so they reflect both our aspirations for our children and the realities of the classroom. These standards are designed to ensure that students graduating from high school are prepared to go to college or enter the workforce and that parents, teachers, and students have a clear understanding of what is expected of them. The standards are benchmarked to international standards to guarantee that our students are competitive in the emerging global marketplace.”

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.6

How these standards apply to teachers who do not teach Math or Language Arts: From the Common Core website (http://www.corestandards.org)

“The Standards set requirements not only for English language arts (ELA) but also for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. Just as students must learn to read, write, speak, listen, and use language effectively in a variety of content areas, so too must the Standards specify the literacy skills and understandings required for college and career readiness in multiple disciplines. Literacy standards for grade 6 and above are predicated on teachers of ELA, history/social studies, science, and technical subjects using their content area expertise to help students meet the particular challenges of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language in their respective fields. It is important to note that the 6–12 literacy standards in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects are not meant to replace content standards in those areas but rather to supplement them. States may incorporate these standards into their standards for those subjects or adopt them as content area literacy standards.”

Understanding the Common Core Standards for ELA: • • • • •

The standards define what all students are expected to know and be able to do, not how teachers should teach Research and media are integrated into all subject areas and are not taught in isolation K-8, grade-by-grade 9-10 and 11-12 grade bands for high school Format highlights progression of standards across grades

ELA Structure for grades K-5: • • • • •

Reading Foundational Skills Writing Speaking and Listening Language

ELA Structure for grades 6-12: • • • •

Reading Writing Speaking and Listening Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.7

Subheadings for each ELA Strand: * refers to grades 6-12 only •









Reading / Literacy in History and Social Studies* /Science and Technical Subjects* o Key Ideas and Details o Craft and Structure o Integration of Knowledge and Ideas o Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity Foundational Skills (K-5 only) o Understanding concepts of print o phonological awareness o phonics and word recognition o Fluency Writing / Literacy in History and Social Studies* / Science and Technical Subjects* o Text types and Purposes o Production and Distribution of Writing o Research to Build and Present Knowledge Speaking and Listening o Comprehension and Collaboration o Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas Language o Conventions of Standard English o Knowledge of Language o Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

Understanding the Common Core Standards for Math: •

Standards for Mathematical Practice o Carry across all grade levels o Describe habits of mind of a mathematically expert student o 8 Standards:  Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them  Reason abstractly and quantitatively  Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others  Model with mathematics  Use appropriate tools strategically  Attend to precision  Look for and make use of structure  Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.8



Standards for Mathematical Content o K-8 standards presented by grade level o Organized into domains that progress over several grades o Grade introductions give 2-4 focal points at each grade level

o

High school standards presented by conceptual theme (Number & Quantity, Algebra, Functions, Modeling, Geometry, Statistics & Probability)

Four Points of Emphasis for Common Core 1- Stress Real World Relevance - We know from research that students will find something much more valuable and interesting if they see the value in it. 2 – Encourages deep content with application through higher order thinking skills – Find and evaluate evidences, strong content knowledge, comprehend and critique 3 – Problem Solving with a Global Perspective – Students understand other cultures and perspectives. Standards were based also on global perspective so that our students would be ready to compete in a global market. 4 - Integrated technology and media literacy – Teaching students how to approach problems with technology. Students will approach problems with technology and be able to evaluate it and use it. How often do you Google something, watch a YouTube video to learn something? How does a student learn to answer their own questions, and do it in a way that is repeatable? Teachers can model how to use technology to do this. So good Common Core lessons will have these characteristics, maybe not all of them ever time, but they should be there if you are designing appropriate lessons for the core. Those are the things we will focus on in this course.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.9

Module 1 New Standards – New Resources Useful Links for Common Core and Creative Lessons

Link

Description

About the Standards

Basic information about the standards, what they mean, and the purpose behind developing them

Key Points for ELA

Key things to remember and keep in mind for English Language Arts

Key Points for Mathematics

Key things to remember and keep in mind for Mathematics

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently asked questions about the Common Core State Standards including how the standards impact teachers in all subject areas

Download the Standards

Click to download the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Mathematics

Examples of Common Core Lessons – English Language Arts http://www.learnnc.org/lp/edit ions/ccss2010-english

Click on the content area on the left, and then choose the grade level. Click on “Find aligned resources” to see a variety of lesson plans that meet the Common Core standards.

Examples of Common Core Lessons - Math http://www.learnnc.org/lp/edit ions/ccss2010-mathematics

Click on the grade level on the left and then choose the topic. Click on “Find aligned resources” to see a variety of lesson plans that meet the Common Core standards.

Inspiration Lesson Plans for the Common Core http://www.inspiration.com/le ssonplans/inspiration

Sample lesson plans to integrate the Common Core; aligned with the Inspiration Software; several of the lessons integrate thinking maps

Illinois State Board of Education http://www.isbe.net/common_ core/htmls/resources.htm

Teaching strategies for the Common Core Standards

North Carolina Standard Course of Study Digital Toolkit http://informationtechnologyto olkit.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/hom e

Strategies, tools, and resources that can be used to enhance learning (Click on the Common Core menu item on the left for additional resources)

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.10

North Carolina Essential Standards Instructional Support Tools http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/ac re/standards/support-tools/

Information on unpacking the Essential Standards (new standards for all subjects except ELA and Math)

North Carolina Common Core and Essential Standards Toolkit http://www.livebinders.com/pl ay/play_or_edit?id=217643

Tons and tons of resources for the Common Core and essential standards, including iPad/Android apps and other web resources

Common Core Curriculum Maps http://commoncore.org/maps/ resources/digital_resources

List of technology resources and websites that can be used to help teach the ELA Common Core Standards

Bloom’s Taxonomy Web Resources http://ecommunity.pwsd76.ab. ca/mod/resource/view.php?id= 46220

Web resources that can be used to address each level of Bloom’s Taxonomy

Khan Academy http://www.khanacademy.org/

Video tutorials that can be used by students to help them understand a wide variety of topics; videos are mapped to the Common Core standards

Learn Zillion http://www.learnzillion.com/

LearnZillion is a learning platform that combines video lessons, assessments, and progress reporting. Each lesson highlights a Common Core standard, starting with math in grades 3-9.

National Science Digital Library http://nsdl.org/commcore/mat h

The NSDL Math Common Core Collection contains digital learning objects that are related to specific Math Common Core State Standards.

LearnNC http://www.learnnc.org

Mainly for North Carolina Teachers this site contains all Common Core standards along with the NC Essential Standards with links to helpful aligned resources for each standard. Mentoring minds provides good descriptions of core along with what to look for and good question prompts to see if they are getting it. Great for parent vole enters that might come into your classroom. What to look for in students what important parts are. Also has suggested vocabulary. This is two app’s one for English Language Arts one for Math. Each app is $20 dollars.

Mentoring Minds http://www.mentoringminds.c om/

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.11

Utah Education Network http://www.uen.org/core/

Reading Works http://www.readworks.org/

Utah Education Network (Utah Core Standards) – Free, Detailed, Organized Lessons, Easy to Navigate, Lots of good games tied directly to core. Much like learnnc.org, shows the standard and then web resources. The links can be even sent home to parents for extra enrichment or resources. One of the best online resources available for Common Core links and resources! Reading Works – Detailed lesson plans – I do it, we do it, then you do it independently. Has free books and passages. You can access and send home. ReadingWorks provides over 1,000 non-fiction reading passages with question sets to support reading activities.

The Teaching Channel https://www.teachingchannel. org/

If you have ever wanted to anonymously look at other teachers classrooms and see what they do- this site is for you. View the way other teachers approach these things. These are videos created by professionals for teachers to use as professional development. Just look at some of the most watched to get some great ideas on things like attention getting signals, and managing transitions.

Watch, Know, Learn http://www.watchknowlearn.o rg/

Tons of well-organized educational video clips. A great site if you do not have united streaming. It has educational videos collected and organized. So you could search for weather, or another topic. Do note that these videos are suggested by users and approved by users. It is the idea of an educational video wiki.

Study Jams http://studyjams.scholastic.co m/studyjams/index.htm

You can find over 200 Jams on topics like The Universe, listen to songs about Landforms, and test your knowledge of Earthquakes just to mention a few things. What is a Study Jam? Created by Scholastic these are wonderfully created video modules that allow students to test themselves and sometimes do interactive games on the topic. Great for extra credit or review.

Pinterest http://pinterest.com/

I have not used Pinterest much, so I am still attempting to warm to this idea. But it does have a lot of people pinning things (I call it grouping) them into organized resources. The searches I do keep turning up amazing things.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.12

Mentor Mob http://www.mentormob.com/

Take word documents, PowerPoint’s, web pages, videos, pdf’s, articles you write, tests you create mix them all together in one place viewable on any computer with an easy slide show feature and you have Mentor Mob. You can browse for resources created by others these are called lessons or Playlists. Or you can create your own - You create a playlist =start with a video, go to your lesson, then go to a game, then to an article. Really nice for lesson design or for letting students design projects within.

LiveBinder http://www.livebinders.com/

Very similar to Mentor Mob, this is kind of like your three ring binder for the web. Collect your resources, Organize them neatly and easily. I like this in a lot ways better because I can choose what to look at, whereas in Mentor Mob I have to follow along the path like a slide show. Both are very useful for lesson planning or for student projects. But honestly I get lost in all the tabs across the top and such when these get really large. I think ascetically there could be a lot done.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.13

Module 2 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games Theories and Philosophies around the use of video games in the classroom.

1 – Understanding learning theory and philosophies: In my view, there are three major philosophies of learning: behaviorist philosophies, cognitivist philosophies, and sociocultural philosophies. While there may be many small theories out there most theories and philosophies I found could be placed into one of those three large categories. The Behaviorist Philosophy The behaviorist philosophy is a view of learning that focuses on behaviors that can be observed. The behaviorist philosophy concerns itself with stimulus and response. Some of the main researchers in this philosophy are Ivan Pavlov & B.F. Skinner. Pavlov is famous for his research done with dogs, and Skinner is famous for his research with birds. To a behaviorist, both humans and animals learn through a system of positive and negative rewards (Shelly, Cashman, Gunter, & Gunter, 2005, p.384). Motivation to learn is assumed to be driven by the external forces of rewards and punishments (Bransford, 2000, p.6). Drill and practice, feedback, and review are major tenants of the behaviorist philosophy. The Cognitivist Philosophy The cognitivist philosophy is a view of learning that examines internal mental processes such as problem solving, memory, and language. Some of the main researchers in this area are Piaget, Papert, and Brunner. They want to know what goes on between the stimulus and response that the behaviorist is using. A cognitivist is concerned with how activities such as thinking and remembering underlie behaviors (Shelly et al., 2005, p. 385). One of the main concerns of the cognitivist is how to move information from short term memory to long term memory. Research has shown that having a general understanding of a topic is much more likely to promote information transfer to long term memory than simply memorizing information from a text or lecture (Bransford et al., 2000, p.236).

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.14

The Sociocultural Philosophy Lastly there is the sociocultural philosophy. The sociocultural philosophy focuses on the context of learning. Socioculturists view learning as something that occurs through interactions with others. Learning can be influenced in fundamental ways by the context in which it takes place (Bransford et al., 2000, p.25). Some of the main researchers in this area are Lave & Wenger, Cole, Engestrom, and Barab. To socioculturists, learning is a social process. The mind is socially formed (Edwards, 2001, p.170). As Clark puts it, the brain is not an intellectual engine, it is an agent acting as an equal partner in adaptive responses that draw on the resources of mind, body and world (Clark, 1997, p. 47). Major Educational Philosophies

Title Behaviorist Philosophy

Description

Typical Methods of Teaching

View of learning that focuses on Direct Instruction what can behaviors that can be Chunk Information observed. Focuses on Stimulus and Response. Drill and Repetition Scripted Teaching

Cognitive Philosophy

View of learning that examines Group Learning internal mental processes such as problem solving, memory, and Discovery Learning language. They want to know what Transfer of Knowledge goes on between stimulus and response. How do you get this piece of stimuli from short term memory to long term memory?

Sociocultural Philosophy

Focuses on the context of learning. Learning occurs in the interactions with others.

Group Learning Problem-based or case-based learning, and of course apprenticeships

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.15

So why does a teacher need to know about the various educational philosophies? I believe it is because knowing those philosophies can allow you to be the best teacher possible. Being familiar with the different learning philosophies allows me to know myself better as a teacher and learner. I believe this broad grounding in all of the major philosophies of learning makes it possible for me to understand technology in the context of teaching and learning, in many ways. Research has shown that with knowledge of how people learn, teachers can choose more purposefully among techniques to accomplish specific goals (Bransford et al., 2000, p.22). Most importantly, I can use this understanding of educational philosophies in combination with my knowledge of games to implement technology solutions that will make me a better teacher. Take the example of an interior designer who didn’t study or even know all the great masters of interior design. The only templates such a person would have to go on would be the rooms they have seen before or could imagine. Now, imagine an interior designer who knew all the great masters and theories of interior design. This person would have many more ideas to choose from in their mind to create whatever type of room is necessary. In the same way, knowing the great philosophies allows me to be the best professional I can be. When I look at designing a workshop, a set of curriculum, or a similar task, I have all these theories to pull from, to mix and match, and to use to create my own unique project based on my strengths and the environment in which I am working. By placing my knowledge of educational philosophies in with my belief that games can be an effective tool for teaching and learning, I believe I can design some of the best learning environments for almost any student. It helps me to be the best teacher or leader that I possibly can be. 2 - Where do games fit? It is possible for me to easily see how games can be an effective tool within any of these philosophies. In the behaviorist view games can provide this positive reinforcement when a desired behavior occurs, and negative reinforcement for undesirable behaviors such as wrong answers. Games never get tired of giving immediate feedback. As with the behaviorist approach, games can also play a very useful role in a cognitivist view, and can facilitate the finding of links in cognitivist theories that will help move something from short term to long term memory. For example, computer simulations have tremendous abilities to provide a context and then give people experiences within that context, like a flight simulator. With the Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.16

sociocultural philosophy, games have the incredible power to connect people inside environments in which they must work and interact to achieve a common goal. As an example, The World of Warcraft is an online game where participants must work together in order to conquer some of the largest challenges in the game. This collaboration has resulted in close friendships being developed through the game. No matter what philosophy a teacher may subscribe to, it is clear that the use of games can assist them in enhancing their instruction. “Some educational technologies can be employed to ensure the rewards and feedback that are critical to a behaviorist approach. Other technologies help a learner construct and test the mental models suggested by cognitivists. Still others encourage and support social exchange to construct new knowledge through social interaction” (Lever-Duffy, McDonald, & Mizell, 2003, p. 23). When used appropriately, games and other technologies can be effective tools in assisting teachers and students within the learning philosophy that they believe best works for them. I encourage you to think about the various educational philosophies and see where your strengths lie, and to think of ways that you can integrate games into that philosophy. Many instructors will teach the way they like to learn, or the way that makes them most comfortable. While that is fine, great teachers will also work outside of their comfort zone to pull in ideas and strategies that will enable them to engage even more of their students. With a good understanding of educational philosophies it is possible to look at ways that games can enhance almost any type of learning situation. I teach an undergraduate class on Instructional Design for teachers. The goal of the class is to help them become better designers of instruction in their future and sometimes current classrooms. While that is a subject that I believe most teachers slowly develop and then become better at with experience, I have found some good skills that I can equip any teacher with that can help them become better designers. In addition, I have found some ways that games can be used to enhance almost any instruction. Having said that I also want to point out that I also believe not every lesson should have a game as part of it. I would like to look at this section as a set of “best practices” when using games. The strategies and reasons for them that I suggest are good ways to implement games, but should not be viewed as being relevant for all situations.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.17

Strategies for Using Games Games can be effective strategies for teaching almost any topic. However, before choosing to implement a game into a lesson there are a couple of things I would suggest you do. I encourage people to focus on two areas for the integration of games: learning of basic knowledge and engagement. Learning of Basic Knowledge - Feedback When the objectives you are attempting to teach are simply things to be memorized or repeated, games can be a tremendous help. These types of objectives require the student to practice and receive feedback. Research shows that feedback is a crucial part of the instructional process (Reiser & Dick, 1996, p. 50). Researcher Robert Marzano went further by arguing that corrective, timely feedback can be one of the best strategies a teacher can use (Marzano, Pickering, & Pollock, 2001, p. 96). Indeed, feedback is so important to the learning process that after reviewing eight thousand studies one researcher claimed that the single best practice to increase achievement is “dollops of feedback” (Hattie, 1992, p. 9). Unfortunately, in many typical classrooms, feedback does not come in “dollops”. In a research article, Arthur Graesser showed how the typical student in a classroom on average gets to ask only one question every nine hours (Graesser & Person, 1994, p. 5). Now imagine a typical game where feedback is instantaneous to input. A player in a game makes an incorrect move, the consequences are immediate. If that same player makes a correct move, the rewards are immediate. Simple drill and practice games can be very effective ways of teaching basic knowledge or skills. As stated, the game will never get tired of allowing students to practice. Games where the student is able to answer questions and receive immediate feedback can be tremendously helpful in learning basic knowledge. Games can make this type of drill and repetition fun and engaging for the student. Engagement – Why it matters? Look at the role of engagement in traditional learning strategies. Is it possible to teach without the engagement of your learner? Most forms of instructional design begin with some form of engagement or attention grabbing activity. Robert Gagne’s nine events of instruction begin with gaining the learner’s attention (Gagne, 2005). Reiser and Dick suggest that motivation be the first thing considered in a unit of instruction (Reiser & Dick, 1996). John Keller’s popular ARCS’ model of motivation begins with getting the attention of your learners (Gagne, 2005, p. 115). It is easy to see that researchers Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.18

agree that engagement is crucial to learning. When students are engaged, they tend to feel more positive emotions such as interest, enthusiasm, pride, enjoyment, and satisfaction. If they are not engaged, they tend to feel more negative emotions like boredom, disinterest, frustration, anxiety, and worry. Today more than ever, engagement of the learner is crucial to successful teaching and learning. How do games provide engagement? According to Robert Marzano, a student’s level of engagement is related to 4 distinct questions: How do I feel? Am I interested? Is this important? Can I do this? Students need to feel accepted and supported in the classroom in order to feel engaged in the lesson. The use of games helps to increase the student’s acceptance by providing him or her with the opportunity to participate with the other students. It helps to make students feel like they are part of a team. The use of games also helps to increase the student’s level of energy and helps the student to build positive relationships. In addition, the use of games in the classroom increases the students’ interest in the activity which in turn, increases the level of engagement. Games are desirable instructional tools because of their ability to engage their players. Games produce some of the highest levels of engagement. The average adult woman plays games 7. 4 hours per week, while the average adult man plays 7. 6 hours per week (ESA, 2006). Engagement, motivation, and desire are traits of games that make them valuable tools in the hands of educators to deliver content. Games can motivate students to fully engage with an exercise sometimes causing players to willingly stay up well into the night exploring alternative approaches and confronting challenges (Jenkins, 2002). While there are many reasons that games are engaging, one reason games are engaging because they are fun. In the book A Theory of Fun for Game Design, Raph Koster defines fun as “the feedback the brain gives us when we are absorbing patterns for learning purposes” (Koster, 2004, p. 96). As such, games are fun because we are learning from them. If games can make learning fun and engaging they are indeed worthy of use in lessons. We know that educators should be able to use different instructional strategies to meet different objectives, and that there is no single best way to teach (Eggen, Kauchak, & Eggen, 2006, p. 16). Instead, exemplary educators use a multitude of different of instructional approaches to help students learn (Lang & Evans, 2006, p. 63). While computer and video games are not a panacea for all education problems, they can be an effective, and engaging instructional strategy. Indeed, computer Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.19

and video games should not be used with all lessons, and must never be thought of as the only part of an instructional lesson. Yet given the large amount of research on the effectiveness of multiple strategies in teaching, it is important that the use of computer and video games be seen as a viable strategy that an educator might use.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.20

Module 2 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games Access to uncw.edu/EdGames Premium Web Site

http://www.uncw.edu/private/siteowner/ Username: siteowner Password: xyt5798

*Please do not share this information with anyone else inside your school or other friends. These premium games are only for registered participants in the Games Good to the Core Online Workshop. If you have friends who would like access to these premium games but they cannot take the workshop, have them visit uncw.edu/EdGames for information on obtaining the premium games. Terms of use for these games can be found online at: http://people.uncw.edu/ertzbergerj/termsofuse.html Technical Support for these Games Please note - Unfortunately, I cannot provide direct technical support for these games at this time. Please note that when you purchased the book these games come complimentary. I wish we could provide some level of tech support but at present that is not possible. If you are having trouble with one of the games there are a couple of things you can do: 1. Read the Instructions. Each game has instructions needed for editing and playing the game located on this web site. 2. Watch the Tutorial Video. Most of the games and templates have accompanying tutorial videos that can help you see how to edit and play the games. All of these can be found on this site, or you can view them on our youtube channel at: youtube.com/uncwedgames 3. Phone a Friend. If you are still having trouble with one of the games, I suggest you find a good PowerPoint or Excel user that you know and ask them to help you. 4. Search the Web. There are lots of good tutorials available on the web for Microsoft Office. For example, just do a Google search for PowerPoint tutorial. It is amazing what you will find. 5. Try another computer. Often times when you simply go to another computer and try to download or use the games you will find that they work just fine.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.21

Module 2 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games iPad/iPhone Games - Apps for Integration the Common Core

App

Common Core Standards by MasteryConnect Available at itunes and Google Play

Description

View the Common Core State Standards in one convenient FREE app! A great reference for students, parents, and teachers to easily read and understand the core standards. Quickly find standards by subject, grade, and subject category (domain/cluster). This app includes Math standards K-12 and Language Arts standards K-12.

Bloom’s Taxonomy of Apps http://issuu.com/ktenkely/docs /lg_alpha?mode=window&back groundColor=%23222222

Useful Apps for each level of Bloom’s Taxonomy

iPad Math Apps http://mathcommoncoreresour ces.wikispaces.com/iPad+Math +Apps

List of various apps that can be used for math (some science as well)

Explain Everything

Cost is $2.99 Presentation app where students make slides shows using audio and illustrations Offers some suggestions for apps that can be used to help special needs students

Common Core Apps for Special Needs Students http://www.techlearning.com/ Default.aspx?tabid=67&EntryId =4598 Manipulative Math Apps http://www.techlearning.com/ Default.aspx?tabid=67&EntryId =4286

Apps for math that allow students to use manipulatives on the iPad

Apps for Common Core Math Standards Grades 6-8 http://www.techlearning.com/ Default.aspx?tabid=67&EntryId =3498

Apps for grades 6-8 Math – variety of apps that offer lessons, quizzes, and games that are aligned with the 6-8 grade standards

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.22

Module 2 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games iPad/iPhone Games - Apps for Integration the Common Core Continued…

Apps

Scribble Press

Super Hero Comic Book Maker Monster at the End of the Book Juno Piano Gazzili

Stack the States

Super Why ABC Adventures

Maily iBrainstrom Inspiration

Description

Great story creation app. With over 500 tools and stickers, and hundreds of extra stickers and backgrounds available for download, you can create and share as many books as you like — all free. Price: Free Additional content packs: $2-$3 dollars. Create your own animated comic book featuring monsters and superheroes! Create and record your own stories! Put multiple scenes together to make a comic strip. Price: $1.99 This classic takes on a whole new life in digital form. Kids go through the book in a tug of war with Elmo who does not want them to get to the end of the book. Price: $4.99 Juno’s Piano takes a fresh spin on musical learning by introducing how to play the piano through Juno, the main character of the Award-winning series Juno Baby and JunoJr. Learn to play songs on the keyboard. Price: $ .99 GazziliShapes is a fun App that teaches Preschoolers challenging shape-related concepts in a kid-friendly way! GazziliShapes ‘dual-curriculum’ approach introduces children not only to important subject matter, but to technology they’ll be using as part of their education for years to come. Great for learning shapes, puzzles, and science. Price: $1.99 Stack the States™ makes learning about the 50 states fun! Watch the states actually come to life in this colorful and dynamic game! As you learn state capitals, shapes, geographic locations, flags and more, you can actually touch, move and drop the animated states anywhere on the screen. Carefully build a stack of states that reaches the checkered line to win each level. App is a great way to learn geography of the US. They also have stack the countries for learning about international geography. Price: $.99 Using the PBS show Super Why character, the App is a comprehensive collection of five interactive literacy games that help build strategies and skills to master the alphabet! With each game hosted by a different Super Reader, your child will be introduced to uppercase and lowercase letters, the order of the alphabet, common letter sounds and writing letters in fun and exciting ways! Great for young readers. Price: $3.99 Maily is a communications tool that lets students share messages and drawings with other students, family, and friends through a simple set of buttons. Great for creating postcards and sending them through emails. Price: Free The name says it all. You brainstorm ideas and place them on your iPad. Add notes, draw, place things in flow charts. Price: Free Many of you have used the popular flow chart and mind mapping software “Inspiration”. This App brings much of the power and ease of use from the desktop version right onto your iPad. Price: $9.99 Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.23

Splastop White Board

Geocaching by Groundspeak, Inc Looking 4 Cache Pro

You connect a laptop or desktop to a LCD projector, then connect your Ipad to that computer wirelessly. This App then allows you to write over top of what is on your laptop/desktop screen, take pictures, etc. The price of this one is a little high I think for what it does, but I think we will begin to see more of these types of applications. Price: $19.99 An application that allows you to hunt for geocaches. Geocaching is a popular hobby and is integrated into curriculum by many teachers. Price: $9.99 Looking4Cache is a App that comes with a large set of functions. It assist you while caching, by preparing your trip and by the finishing works. Particular attention is paid to offline abilities, easy handling and extensibility. Another good geocaching application. Price: $8.99

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.24

Module 2 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games Integration Ideas for UNCW EdGames

Game Big Board Facts Space Decoder

How it can be integrated Language Arts Math

Have students answer questions about a novel or story – the game can be set up so that the questions are generic and can apply to any story; they can also be written for a specific story or novel Vocabulary building – students are asked to define a vocabulary word or use it correctly in a sentence Students could be assigned the task of creating their own game/questions for a story or novel Have students identify the part of speech that is underlined Give students names of characters and have them name the story (or give them the author, setting, plot, problem solution, them, etc) Identify the point of view of a sentence or paragraph

Students answer word problems Have students correctly identify the: • Geometric shape • 3 dimensional figure • Symbol • Fraction • Sum, product, difference, quotient • Operation • Unit of measure • Coordinates on a grid • Mean • Median • Range • Slope • Line of symmetry Given a word problem, have students write the correct algebraic expression Have students create their own multistep word problems (as appropriate for their grade level)

Identify the author’s purpose of a paragraph Distinguish between fact and opinion Identify sentences with correct comma usage Define prefixes and suffixes and words that contain them

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.25

Module 2 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games Integration Ideas for UNCW EdGames Continued…

Game The Big Wheel Align the Stars Racing Games Sunken Treasure What’s Behind the Box?

How it can be integrated Language Arts Math

*Can be used with examples from above – just have the questions ready (no need to enter questions into game)

*Can be used with examples from above – just have the questions ready (no need to enter questions into game)

Have students identify examples of figurative language or irony, etc. in a story; when they do, their team gets a turn to spin/move their car, etc.

Have students solve problems as a team and if they get the answer correct, their team gets a turn

These games could be played over multiple days as a review – give teams a question that reviews material from a previous lesson; as a part of their morning work or bell work, have them work with their team to solve the question and then turn in the answer; if the team is correct, they get a spin/turn. Play the game for several days before starting over.

These games could be played over multiple days as a review – give teams a question that reviews material from a previous lesson; as a part of their morning work or bell work, have them work with their team to solve the question and then turn in the answer; if the team is correct, they get a spin/turn. Play the game for several days before starting over.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.26

Module 2 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games Integration Ideas for UNCW EdGames *Denotes a game found on the Premium EdGames Web Site

Need Holiday Themed Quick Games Ready to use Games, just open in PowerPoint and Play Effective uses: Test Review, Vocabulary Review, Concept Review

Matching uncw.edu/EdGames Templates or Premade Games Halloween Trick or Treat* Turkey Gone – Thanksgiving* Valentine Arcade* Where is Santa* Race to Bethlehem*

Sports Themed Quick Games Ready to use Games, just open in PowerPoint and Play Effective uses: Test Review, Vocabulary Review, Concept Review

Goal Kick* – Soccer Home Run Day* - Baseball March Mayhem* - Basketball Simple Bowling* Mountain Climber* Dart Toss*

TV Game Shows Whole class participation games with previously input questions by teacher or a student. Effective uses: Test Review, Vocabulary Review, Concept Review, Problem Solving, Compare-Contrast

Big Board Facts* (Jeopardy) What is Louie Thinking* (TV Pyramid Game) Robie Knows* (Family Feud) Open that Door* ( Let’s Make a Deal)

Quick – Ready to use Game Ready to use Games, just open in PowerPoint and Play Effective uses: Test Review, Vocabulary Review, Concept Review

The Big Wheel Align the Stars Racing Games (Cars or Horses) Sunken Treasure What’s Behind the Box Star Bomba* Finders Keepers Mine* Space Tac* Ladder Climb*

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.27

Module 2 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games Integration Ideas for UNCW EdGames Continued… *Denotes a game found on the Premium EdGames Web Site

Need No Projector or Large Screen Games to play on paper Print out ahead of time and distribute to students, or Show on Overhead.

Matching uncw.edu/EdGames Templates or Premade Games Bingo Cards Printable Board Games Scrambled Words

Effective uses: Test Review, Vocabulary Review, Concept Review, Problem Solving, Compare-Contrast, Pre-Reading Activities Whole Class Games Car Race with Quesitons* One computer to one child with Horse Race with Questions* previously input questions by teacher or a student. Effective uses: Test Review, Vocabulary Review, Concept Review, Problem Solving, Compare-Contrast Computer Lab or Individual Review One computer to one child with previously input questions by teacher or a student. Effective uses: Test Review, Vocabulary Review, Concept Review, Problem Solving, Compare-Contrast

Space Decoder The Maze* Blaze Training* (Fire Fighter Game) Buttons* Fire Rescue* Space Rescue* Break the Code*

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.28

Module 2 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games Resources for Game Creation and Use 1- Game Creation Software Squeak - http://www.squeakland.org/ Scratch – http://scratch.mit.edu Gamemaker – http://yoyogames.com Second Life – http://secondlife.com/ RPG Maker - http://www.rpgmakerweb.com/ Visionaire - http://www.visionaire2d.net/ Lassie Adventure Studio - http://lassie.gmacwill.com/lower.php?section=about&page=index Stagecast - http://www.stagecast.com/ Sploder - http://www.sploder.com/ Thinking Worlds - http://www.thinkingworlds.com

2- Educational Game Studies Quest Atlantis – http://crlt.indiana.edu/research/qa.html River City - http://muve.gse.harvard.edu/rivercityproject/index.html 3) Projectors/Convertors: For Using Games with Entire Class Projectors - http://www.InFocus.com PC to TV Converters – Just run a search for these most around $40 dollars 4) Grants to pay for those things found in number three above: Bright ideas Grant (North Carolina Only) - http://www.ncbrightideas.com/ Donors Choose - http://www.donorschoose.org/

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.29

Module 3 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games Demonstration and Application

Common Core Goals …. 1- Stress Real World Relevance - We know from research that students will find something much more valuable and interesting if they see the value in it. 2 – Encourages deep content with application through higher order thinking skills – Find and evaluate evidences, strong content knowledge, comprehend and critique. 3 – Problem Solving with a Global Perspective – Students understand other cultures and perspectives. Standards were based also on global perspective so that our students would be ready to compete in a global market. 4 - Integrated Technology and Media Literacy – Teaching students how to approach problems with technology. Students will approach problems with technology and be able to evaluate it and use it. How often do I Google something, watch a YouTube video? How does a student learn to answer their own questions? Teachers can model how to use technology to do this.

So good Common Core lessons will have these characteristics, maybe not all of them ever time, but they should be there if you are designing appropriate lessons for the core. In the following three example lessons, these Common Core Goals are pointed out.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.30

Module 3 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games Demonstration and Application 3rd Grade Reading Lesson Standard: 3.RIT.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. Objective: Given a graphic organizer and a short story, students will determine the main idea and supporting details of the given text. Definitions used in lesson • •

Main Idea: the most important part of the text Supporting details: information from a text that helps clarify, explain, or expand the main idea

Anticipatory Set: • •

• •

CC Goal: Tech Integration

Show the PowerPoint file called – “Fruit-Sports” PowerPoint to students. On the first slide is pieces of fruit on a table o Ask the students what the theme of the food is? (fruit) o Explain that fruit can be thought of as the main idea and the strawberries, oranges, and mangos can be thought of as the supporting detail to prove that they all fit under the theme or main idea of fruit. Repeat the same steps with images of sporting events in the PowerPoint. Today we will be learning about the main idea and supporting details of a text.

Introduction: •

Introduce new vocabulary terms: Main Idea and Supporting Details o Write our definitions on sentence strips to hang on the walls for a reference point

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.31

Lesson: • •

Read aloud the Education World Article ‘Kids Buy Lunch With Finger Scans’ Pass out the ‘hamburger’ graphic organizer for students to complete together. Use the teacher’s copy as an example of what they could do.

Student’s Copy •



• •

Teacher’s Copy

What is the main idea of the story? o Explain to students that sometimes titles are used to help direct you to the main idea of the story. This is just a direction, not the answer. o Main Idea: Finger scanners can be used to help life run smoothly CC Goal: o Complete the Hamburger Graphic Organizer as a class Real World Relevance Fill in the corresponding information for supporting details o Teachers don’t have to collect money o Lunch lines moves faster o Students don’t have to worry about losing money o Can be used for other things in school as well, like checking out a book Students should be placed in pairs Pass out copies of the text ‘Chips, Anyone?’ (1 per pair of students) CC Goal: Global Perspective

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.32



Pass out the Main Idea Graphic Organizer for this text (1 per student) o Explain to students that this graphic organizer looks different but the idea is still the same. Teacher’s Example.

• •

Students will read the story with their partner and complete the graphic organizer After students have finished, have students share their main idea and supporting details for the text ‘Chips, Anyone?’

Practice: Game Option 1 • • • • •

CC Goal: Tech Integration

Using the uncw.edu/EdGames template “Behind the Box”: Create a PowerPoint that has photos containing groups of items. Could be people, items, or anything similar. Divide students into groups. For each groups’ turn the teacher removes one “box” from the screen. Students are then asked to identify the main idea of the photo. If they can name the main idea of the photo they receive 10 points (teacher keeps score on board, or a piece of paper.) If they cannot it continues to the next team. The photo should be easier to identify as the game continues and more and more boxes are removed. You can rotate asking between “what is the main idea”, and “what are the supporting details”.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.33

Game Option 2 • • • •

Using the uncw.edu/EdGames template “The Big Wheel”: Read one short story at a time to students. Divide students into groups. Ask individuals on a team to state the main idea, or a supporting detail from the story. For each correct answer the teacher will spin the wheel and give that team the selected number of points. Game continues until teacher runs out of stories and questions, or until class time ends.

Closure: •

Teacher reviews with students the definitions for main idea and supporting details.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.34

Module 3 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games Demonstration and Application

Example Lesson Plan #2 Grade 3 – Author Study Conclusion Common Core Objective: Reading Standards for Literature K-5 Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 9. Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series). Lesson: 1.

2.

Over the course of several lessons, read books by author Patricia Polacco (or pick any author you would like – just make sure you can get ahold of several of his/her stories. Other author suggestions are Jan Brett and Chris Van Allsburg). Some suggestions for books by Patricia Polacco include: a. Thank You, Mr. Falker b. The Trees of the Dancing Goats c. The Graves Family Goes Camping d. My Rotten Redheaded Older Brother Before reading the stories, explain to students that they will begin an author study. For this author study, tell them they are going to be reading stories by Patricia Polacco. Find some background information on Patricia Polacco and share that with the students. Background info: Patricia Polacco was born in Lansing, Michigan in 1944. As a student, she struggled with dyslexia and found relief by expressing herself through art. At the age of 14, she was still unable to read until one of her school teachers recognized the problem and started to work with her. Her book, Thank You, Mr. Falker is a retelling of that story. Growing up, she was very close with her grandparents, which is one of the reasons several of her stories have a young person interacting with an elderly person. She went to college, graduate school, and eventually earned a PhD in Art History. She didn’t start writing children’s books until she turned 41. She says she was raised hearing good stories being told by family members and that hearing the stories eventually led to her writing them down and drawing pictures to help illustrate them. She has 2 children and currently lives in Union City, Michigan.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.35

3.

4.

As you read the stories, have students identify the basic story elements – settings, characters, plots, themes, etc). Encourage students to make text-to-text connections between the stories. For example, have them look for similarities between the stories. Students should also be encouraged to make text-to-self connections (things in the story that reminds them of something in their own lives). Have students complete a chart after reading each story where they can record information on each book’s characters, setting, theme, plot, CC Goal: Tech etc. See example chart at the end of the lesson.

Integration

5.

Use the game “Big Board” from the UNCW Ed games website. Label the categories as: title, characters, setting, plot, and theme (categories should match the categories on the chart). You can also include other categories as appropriate (figurative language, mood, etc.). Each question should be a detail from a story – use the chart for ideas. For example: Name the main character(s) in Thank You, Mr. Falker. More difficult questions could be something like: In which 2 stories is the setting a school classroom? Play the game like jeopardy – students pick a question and then have to answer. If students are having a difficult time, let them use their charts they made.

Useful Resource for Patricia Polacco: http://www.patriciapolacco.com/

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.36

Example Chart:

Name of Story

Main Characters

Secondary Characters

Setting

Problem

Solution

Theme

Mood

Thank You, Mr. Falker

The Trees of the Dancing Goats

The Graves Family Goes Camping

My Rotten Redheaded Older Brother

Lesson plan authored by J. Scharrf

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.37

Module 3 Designing Engaging Lessons with Games Demonstration and Application

Example Lesson Plan #3 7th Grade Mathematics Lesson Title: A Frisbee Factory Hunt Standard: 7.G.4 Know the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle and use them to solve problems; give an informal derivation of the relationship between the circumference and area of a circle. Objective: Given radius or diameter, students will calculate the area of a circle using the formula A= ∏r2. Definitions used in lesson Area: the size of a surface Formula to find area of a circle: A= ∏r2 Diameter: Distance across the center of the circle or twice the radius Formula to find Diameter: D=2r Radius: The distance from the center of a circle to the edge of the circle Formula to find Radius: r = ½D Pi: Represented by a symbol (∏) Pi symbol represents a fraction 22/7 and is widely recognized as 3.14 Pi is an endless number

Anticipatory Set: • Pass out Frisbees to pairs of students. Tell students that they work for a Frisbee company and they are Frisbee experts. • Ask students to describe their Frisbee with their partner. Have some students share responses • If a mathematician were to describe their Frisbee, how might they describe it? • A Mathematician may describe the Frisbee based on its area and circumference.

CC Goal: Real World Relevance

Your Charge to the Students: The local Frisbee company in town has determined through customer research that what the best Frisbees look like. So the know the shape of the Frisbees Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.38

they want to produce, what they need you to be able to help them determine are sizes of the Frisbees they need to produce. In order to do this you will need to use Radius, Circumference, and Diameter. Create badges that say – Frisbee Engineer? Introduction: • Draw a square on the board. • Ask a student to color in the area of the square drawn. o We have learned that this represents the area of a square. • Draw a circle on the board and students should draw one in their math notebook. • From what we know about the area of a square, have a student apply that knowledge to draw in the area of a circle. (Students duplicate process in their math notebook and label it AREA) • Students then need to write the definition of area in their math notebook. • Draw another circle on the board and students should draw one in their math notebook. • On the circle draw a line segment to represent the diameter, students should do the same in their math notebook and label it DIAMETER. o Students should write the definition and formula for diameter of a circle in their math notebook. • Draw another circle on the board and students should draw one in their math notebook. • On the circle draw a line segment from the center of the circle to an edge to represent the radius, students should do the same in their math notebook and label it RADIUS. o Students should write the definition and formula for radius of a circle in their math notebook. o Students should write the definition and formula for radius of a circle in their math notebook.

CC Goal: Real World Relevance

Guided Practice Review: • The Frisbee company has informed us that they need to know the Diameter of one of the Frisbees if the radius of that Frisbee is 4inches. (Point out that inches represents the unit. Remind students that their unit measurement should be the same throughout a problem.) Have students practice. • Walk students through the steps to solve the problem o Step 1: Write out formula: D=2r o Step 2: Fill in information: D=2*4 o Step 3: Compute: D=8  Final answer for the diameter of a Frisbee(circle) with a radius of 4 inches is 8 inches • Next the company needs to know the radius of one of their Frisbees (circle) if the diameter is 20 cm. Have students practice • Walk students through the steps to solve the problem o Step 1: Write out formula: r = ½D o Step 2: Fill in information: r = ½ * 20 o Step 3: Compute: r =10 Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.39



Final answer for the radius of a circle with a diameter of 20cm is 10cm

Lesson: • Using what we know about Diameter and radius we will calculate the area of a circle. • Write the formula for the area of a circle on the board (A= ∏r2) with the definition of area. Students are to duplicate this in their math notebook. • Define Pi – represented through symbol, fraction, and decimal form. Pi is an infinite CC Goal: number. Tech • Show Youtube video of the first 10,000 digits of Pi Integration (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpvLWaVcA4A) • Draw a circle on the board with the radius labeled 2inches and students should draw one in their math notebook. 2in • Model for students how to find the area of the circle (Students should write down the steps in their math notebook.) o Step 1: Write out formula: A= ∏r2 o Step 2: Fill in information: A= ∏*22 o Step 3: Compute  A= ∏*(2x2)  A= ∏*(4)  A= 12.56  Final answer for the area of a circle with a radius of 2in is 12.56in2 • This circle has an estimate area of 12-13 inches2 • What about if we had to find the area of a circle and we were given the diameter? o Tell the students our Frisbee company needs us to find the area of a Frisbee (circle) with a diameter of 10inches o Allow time for them to complete  We have to find the radius in order to compute the area o Step 1: Write out formula: r = ½D o Step 2: Fill in information: r = ½ * 10 o Step 3: Compute: r =5  Final answer for the radius of our circle is 5in o Now we can use this new number (the radius) to find the area o Step 4: Write out formula: A= ∏r2 o Step 5: Fill in information: A= ∏*52 o Step 6: Compute  A= ∏*(5x5)  A= ∏*(25)  A= 78.5  Final answer for the area of a circle with a diameter of 10in is 78.5inches2 • This circle has an estimate area of 78-79 inches2

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.40

Practice: Game Option 1 • • • •

Using the uncw.edu/EdGames game “Car Race”. Divide students into groups. Ask individuals an entire team a team a question where they have to find the radius, diameter, or area of a circle. (Have the other teams also work the problem in order to make sure they agree with the first team.) For each correct answer the teacher will move the selected teams car forward one spot by clicking the cars corresponding airplane banner. Game continues until teacher runs out of questions or until a car crosses the finish line. If that occurs simply re-start a new game and continue until all questions are completed or class time ends.

Game Option 2 • • • •

Using the uncw.edu/EdGames template game “Space Decoder”. Teacher or a student inputs questions regarding finding the diameter, radius, or area of a circle into the blank question template pages. Students go through the game using a computer in the classroom, or computer in the computer lab. Game play continues until students reach the end of the game, or until class time ends.

Closure: Review definitions and formulas for finding radius, diameter, and area.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.41

REFERENCES Bransford, J.(2000). How people learn : Brain, mind, experience, and school. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Clark, A. (1997). Being there: Putting brain, body, and world together again. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Edwards, A. (2001). Researching pedagogy: A sociocultural agenda. Pedagogy, Culture and Society, 9(2), 161-186. Eggen, P. D., Kauchak, D. P., & Eggen, P. D. (2006). Strategies and models for teachers: Teaching content and thinking skills (5th ed.). Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon. ESA, T. (2006). Top 10 industry facts. Retrieved May 11, 2007, from http://theesa.com/facts/top_10_facts.php Gagnâe, R. M. (2005). Principles of instructional design (5th ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson/Wadsworth. Graesser, A., & Person, N. (1994). Question asking during tutoring. American Educational Research Journal, 31(1), 104-137. Hattie, J. (1992). Measuring the effects of schooling. The Australian Journal of Education, 36(1), 5-13.

Jenkins, H. (2002). Game theory. Retrieved August 5, 2007, from http://www.technologyreview.com/Energy/12784/

Koster, R. (2004). Theory of fun for game design. Scottsdale, AZ: Paraglyph Press. Lang, H. R., & Evans, D. N. (2006). Models, strategies, and methods for effective teaching (1st ed.). Boston: Pearson/A and B. Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.42

Lever-Duffy, J., McDonald, J. B., & Mizell, A. P. (2003). Teaching and learning with technology. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Marzano, R. J., Pickering, D., & Pollock, J. E. (2001). Classroom instruction that works: Research-based strategies for increasing student achievement. Alexandria, VA.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Reiser, R. A., & Dick, W. (1996). Instructional planning: A guide for teachers (2nd ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Shelly, G., Cashman, T., Gunter, G., & Gunter, R. (2005). Teachers discovering computers: Integrating technology and digital media in the classroom (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Course Technology.

Games Good to the Core Workshop – Course Pack p.43