Now you see me, now you don't: observation of a ...

4 downloads 22781 Views 680KB Size Report
to self-archive your article, please use the accepted manuscript version for posting on your own website. ... releases of ink can also create “pseudomorphs” in the.

Now you see me, now you don’t: observation of a squid hiding in its ink trail

Michael J. Miller, Tetsuya Miwa, Noritaka Mochioka, Shun Watanabe, Yoshiaki Yamada, Tatsuhiro Fukuba & Katsumi Tsukamoto Marine Biodiversity ISSN 1867-1616 Volume 45 Number 2 Mar Biodiv (2015) 45:149-150 DOI 10.1007/s12526-014-0249-9

1 23

Your article is protected by copyright and all rights are held exclusively by Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and SpringerVerlag Berlin Heidelberg. This e-offprint is for personal use only and shall not be selfarchived in electronic repositories. If you wish to self-archive your article, please use the accepted manuscript version for posting on your own website. You may further deposit the accepted manuscript version in any repository, provided it is only made publicly available 12 months after official publication or later and provided acknowledgement is given to the original source of publication and a link is inserted to the published article on Springer's website. The link must be accompanied by the following text: "The final publication is available at link.springer.com”.

1 23

Author's personal copy Mar Biodiv (2015) 45:149–150 DOI 10.1007/s12526-014-0249-9

OCEANARIUM

Now you see me, now you don’t: observation of a squid hiding in its ink trail Michael J. Miller & Tetsuya Miwa & Noritaka Mochioka & Shun Watanabe & Yoshiaki Yamada & Tatsuhiro Fukuba & Katsumi Tsukamoto

Received: 27 August 2013 / Revised: 17 December 2013 / Accepted: 4 June 2014 / Published online: 24 June 2014 # Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Pelagic cephalopods such as squid change coloration for camouflage or release ink as a defensive mechanism while being attacked by predators, which may block the view of the predator, have noxious chemical effects, or act as a warning signal for other squid (Bush and Robison 2007; Derby 2007; Wood et al. 2010). Pulsed releases of ink can also create “pseudomorphs” in the shape of squid that may serve as decoys to confuse predators about the location of the actual squid (Bush and Robison 2007; Wood et al. 2010). Some aspects of deep-sea squid behavior, including releases of their ink, have been observed using remote operated vehicles (ROV) (Hunt et al. 2000; Bush and Robison 2007), but most species have not been studied.

Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12526-014-0249-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

a

b

c

M. J. Miller (*) Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, Chiba, Japan e-mail: [email protected] T. Miwa : T. Fukuba Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Kanagawa, Japan N. Mochioka Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan S. Watanabe : K. Tsukamoto College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Kanagawa, Japan Y. Yamada IRAGO Institute, Aichi, Japan

Fig. 1 Frame captures of a squid that was observed hiding within its ink for 6 s before escaping left and down. Arrows show locations of the squid

During Hyper-Dolphin ROV (JAMSTEC) deployments over the West Mariana Ridge, observations were made of an unidentified species of pelagic squid (