Syllabus - Institute of Kashmir Studies, UOK - University of Kashmir

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The total intake capacity for this course has been determined at 30 (thirty) students. Out of the ... The course is to be completed in two years consisting of 4 Semesters with 96 Credits. In ...... Jammu: Bhagatan, Kud. 4.1.3. .... Dabla, B. A. 2007.

Syllabus for Masters Programme in

under Choice Based Credit Scheme

Introduction Semester I Semester II Semester III Semester IV

3 9 29 47 69

SEMESTER-WISE SCHEME FORMAT FOR TWO-YEAR MA PROGRAMME IN KASHMIR AND SOUTH ASIA STUDIES (2014 onwards) Introduction Masters programme in “Kashmir and South Asia Studies” has been introduced at the UMIKS from 2013 academic session under a reformulated MoU between South Asia Foundation (SAF), India and University of Kashmir, Srinagar, which was concluded on 23 August, 2012. The total intake capacity for this course has been determined at 30 (thirty) students. Out of the 30 students, 16 students would be from SAARC countries and the rest locals. The admission of local students for MA Programme shall be done through the entrance test conduct by the University of Kashmir. Programme Rationale The MA programme is intended to achieve four major objectives: I.

II. III. IV.

The MA programme shall operate within the multi-disciplinary framework. The teacher has to synergize Kashmir and South Asia in his/her method of teaching and discussion. It aims at giving the students thorough grounding in certain foundational courses related to Kashmir and South Asia. The students are also introduced to specialized areas by offering them a number of optional courses. The students at 4th Semester are required to write a Term Paper by undertaking purposeful field work.

Course Outline The course is to be completed in two years consisting of 4 Semesters with 96 Credits. In each Semester, every student has to obtain a minimum of 24 Credits. However, 12 Credits are compulsory and are to be obtained from Core Courses offered by the Institute while the remaining 12 Credits can be obtained through either of the following ways: I. 12 Credits can be obtained within the Institute as far as the papers in Allied Electives are concerned; or II. The candidate has the liberty to obtain 8 Credits from the Institute from ‘Allied Elective’ category and 4 Credits can be obtained from the Faculty of Social Sciences. However, the students, in any case, have to obtain a minimum of 4 Credits from the ‘General/Elective Open’ category from outside the Institute. The paper setter is required to follow the pattern as is operational in the University of Kashmir.

Introduction 

3

SEMESTER I (12:12:0:0 or 12:8:4:0 or 12:4:8:0 or 12:4:4:4) Page No 10

Course Course Name Code KS-01-CR Theories of Regionalism and Integration KS-02-CR Democracy and Development in South Asia KS-03-CR Political Economy of South Asia

Paper Category Core

Hours Credits L T P 4 0 0 4

Core

4

0

0

4

12

Core

4

0

0

4

14

KS-04-EA Geography of Jammu and Kashmir

Allied (Elective) Allied (Elective) Allied (Elective) Allied (Elective) Elective (Open)

4

0

0

4

17

4

0

0

4

19

4

0

0

4

21

4

0

0

4

23

4

0

0

4

26

24 0

0

24

KS-05-EA Fratricidal Violence: South Asian Partition Literature KS-06-EA Kashmir Philosophy and Learning KS-07-EA Languages of Jammu and Kashmir KS-08-EO Central Asia: Politics and Economy 24 Credits=24 Contact Hours

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UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies

SEMESTER II (12:12:0:0 or 12:8:4:0 or 12:4:8:0 or 12:4:4:4) Course Code

Course Name

Paper Category

Hours

Credits

Page No

KS-09-CR Regional Integration in a Comparative Perspective KS-10-CR Human Development in South Asia

Core

L 4

Core

4

0

0

4

32

KS-11-CR Governance and Development

Core

4

0

0

4

35

KS-12-EA Economy of Jammu and Kashmir

Allied (Elective)

4

0

0

4

37

KS-13-EA Folk-Lore and Oral Literature of Kashmir

Allied (Elective)

4

0

0

4

39

KS-14-EA History and Aesthetics in Kashmir

Allied (Elective)

4

0

0

4

41

KS-15-EA Environment: Politics and Policy

Allied (Elective)

4

0

0

4

43

KS-16-EO Kashmir and Central Asia in a Historical Perspective

Elective (Open)

4

0

0

4

45

24 0

0

24

24 Credits=24 Contact Hours

T P 0 0

4

30

Introduction 

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SEMESTER III (12:12:0:0 or 12:8:4:0 or 12:4:8:0 or 12:4:4:4) Course Code

Course Name

Paper Category

Hours Credits L T P

Page No

KS-17-CR

Gender and Society in South Asia

Core

4

0

0

4

48

KS-18-CR

Peace and Conflict Studies

Core

3

0

0

3

51

KS-19-CR

Seminar

Core

0

0

2

1

53

KS-20-CR

Globalisation and South Asia

Core

4

0

0

4

54

KS-21-EA

Social Science Research Methods I

4

0

0

4

57

KS-22-EA

Media and Society

4

0

0

4

59

KS-23-EA

Higher Education in South Asia

Allied (Elective) Allied (Elective) Allied (Elective)

4

0

0

4

62

KS-24-EA

Cultural History of Kashmir

Allied (Elective)

4

0

0

4

64

KS-25-EO

South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC)

Elective (Open)

4

0

0

4

66

23 0

2

24

24 Credits = 25 Contact Hours

6 

UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies

SEMESTER IV (12:12:0:0 or 12:8:4:0 or 12:4:8:0 or 12:4:4:4) Course Code

Page No

Paper Category

Hours Credits L T P

Term Paper/Presentation/VivaVoce Public Policy: Theory and Practice

Core

0

0

8

4

70

Core

4

0

0

4

71

Core

4

0

0

4

73

0

0

4

75

4

0

0

4

79

4

0

0

4

82

KS-32-EA

Demography and Health

Allied (Elective) Allied (Elective) Allied (Elective) Allied (Elective)

4

KS-31-EA

India’s Policy Towards its Neighbours Federalism and Devolutionary Process in South Asia Internal Displacement and Refugee Flow in South Asia Social Science Research Methods II

4

0

0

4

84

KS-33-EO

Religions of South Asia

4

0

0

4

86

20 0 8

24

KS-26-CR KS-27-CR KS-28-CR KS-29-EA KS-30-EA

Course Name

24 Credits = 28 Hours

Elective (Open)



Introduction 

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Semester I

Course Title:  THEORIES OF REGIONALISM AND INTEGRATION  Course Code: KS‐01‐CR  UNIT: I The Concept of Region 1.1. 1.2. 1.3. 1.4.

Defining Region Geographical Proximity Patterns of Interaction Regions as Containers of Cultural Difference

UNIT: II Regional Security Complex 2.1. 2.2. 2.3. 2.4.

Regions as Zones of Conflict Regions as Zones of Cooperation Regional Security Complexes in the Developing World Regional Security Arrangements: Motivations and Patterns

UNIT: III Dimensions of Region 3.1. 3.2. 3.3. 3.4.

Internal Dimension of Region External Dimension of Region Resolution of Internal Conflicts Cohesion Regarding External Challenges

UNIT: IV Theories of Integration 4.1. 4.2. 4.3. 4.4.

Federalism Functionalism Neo-Functionalism Transactionalism

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Credits= 4:0:0 

Reading List 





  



      

Anderson, Kim, and Hege Norheim (1993), ‘History Geography and Regional Economic Integration’, in Kim Anderson and Richard Blackhurst (eds.), Regional Integration and the Global Trading System, London: Harvester Wheats heaf, 19-51. Balassa, Bela (1961), TheTheory of Economic Integration, Westport: Greenwood Press. Baldwin, R.E. (1995) ‘What Caused the Resurgence of Regionalism?’Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics 131: 45 Bhagwati, Jagdish (1993). ‘Regionalism and Multilateralism: An Overview’ in Jaime De Meloand Arvind Panagariya (eds.)Dimensions in Regional Integration, New York: Cambridge University Press, 122-151. Buzan, Barry, Ole Wæver and Jaap de Wilde (1998), Security: A New Framework for Analysis, Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner. Cantori, Louis J. and Steven L. Spiegel (1970): ‘The International Relations of Regions’, Polity 2 (4): 397-425. Deutsch, Karl W., Sidney A. Burnett, Robert A. Kann, Maurice Less, Jr., Martin Lichterman, Raymond E. Lindgren, Francis L. Loewenheim, and Richard W. Van Wagenen (1957), Political Community in the North Atlantic Area: International Organization in the Light of Historical Experience, Princeton: Princeton University Press. Eichengreen, Barryand Jeffrey A. Frankel (1995), ‘Economic Regionalism: Evidence from Two Twentieth Century Episodes’, North American Journal of Economics and Finance6 (2):89-106. Etzioni, Amitai (1965), Political Unification: A Comparative Study of Leaders and Forces, New York: Holt Rhinehartand Winston. Fawcett, Louise and Andrew Hurrell (eds) (1994), Regionalism in World Politics: Regional Organisations and World Order, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Gamble, Andrew and Anthony Payne(eds) (1996), Regionalism and World Order, Houndmills: Macmillan. Groom, A. J. R. and Paul Taylor (eds) (1995), Functionalism: Theory and Practice in International Relations, London: University of London Press. Grugel, Jean and WilHout (eds) (1998), Regionalism Across the North-South Divide: State Strategies and Globalisation, London: Routledge. Hettne, Björn, AndrasInotai and Osvaldo Sunkel (eds) (1999), Globalism and the new Regionalism, London: Macmillan. Mansfield, Edward D and Helen V. Milner (eds) (1999), ‘The New Wave of Regionalism’, International Organisation53 (3): 589-627.

Semester I 11  

Course Title: DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH ASIA  Course Code: KS‐02‐CR                                                                                      Credits= 4:0:0  UNIT: I South Asia: Idea and Identity 1.1. History of the Colonial Experience 1.2. The Rise of Nationalism 1.3. Nation-State and Challenges of Nation-Building (India and Pakistan) 1.4. Cultures of Democracy in South Asia UNIT: II Democracy and Diversity 2.1. Federalism on Road: Region and Regionalism (India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Pakistan) 2.2. Sub-Regional Cooperation in South Asia 2.3. Local-Self Governance (India and Pakistan) 2.4. Women in Politics (India, Pakistan and Bangladesh) UNIT: III Democracy: Hard and Soft Power 3.1. Civil-Military Relations (India and Pakistan) 3.2. Judicial Activism and Democratic Consolidation 3.3. Media: New Trends 3.4. Civil Society: Role and Significance UNIT: IV Imagining South Asia Futures 4.1. Scholarship in and on South Asia 4.2. Identity Politics: Region and Religion 4.3. Armed Movements and State Response (India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan) 4.4. The Future of Integration

12 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Reading List                

Baxter C. et al edited. Government and Politics in South Asia. Boulder, Westview, 1987. Bestsch Gary K. et al. eds., Engaging India: US Strategic Relations with the World’s Largest Democracy. New York, Routledge, 1999. Bose Sugata and Ayesha Jalal. Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy. New Delhi, Oxford University Press, 1997. Brass Paul R. (ed), Routledge Handbook of South Asian Politics: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal. London, Routledge, 2010. ChiltyNaren. Framing South Asia Transformations. New Delhi, South Asian Publishers, 1994. Garmer B.H. An Introduction to South Asia. London, Routledge, 1993. GhoshPartha S. Cooperation and Conflict in South Asia. New Delhi, Manohar, 1995. Iftekharuzzaman Edited. Ethnicity and Constitutional Reform in South Asia. New Delhi, Manohar, 1998. Jalal, Ayesha. Democracy and authoritarianism in South Asia: A comparative and historical perspective. U.K., Cambridge University Press, 1995. Kodikara Shelton U. edited. External Compulsions of South Asian Politics. New Delhi, Sage, 1993. Low, D A (ed.), The Political Inheritance of Pakistan. Bansingstok, Macmillan, 1991. Malik, Yogendra, K. edited. Government and Politics in South Asia, (Sixth edition), USA, Westview Press, 2008. Nizamani, Haider, K. The Roots of Rhetoric: Politics of Nuclear Weapons in India and Pakistan. New Delhi, India Research Press, 2001. Shelton, Kodikara, U. edited. South Asian Strategic Issues. New Delhi, Sage, 1990. Stern Robert W. Democracy and Dictatorship in South Asia. New Delhi, India Research Press, 2001. Wilson Jeyaratnam A. and Dennis Dalton (eds.), The States of South Asia: Problems of National Integration. London, 1982.

Semester I 13  

Course Title: POLITICAL ECONOMY OF SOUTH ASIA  Course Code: KS‐03‐CR 

Credits= 4:0:0 

UNIT: I Introduction 1.1.Political Economy as an Academic Discipline 1.2.Approaches to Political Economy: 1.2.1. Classical Liberalism 1.2.2. Marxism 1.2.3. Welfarism 1.2.4. Neo-Liberalism 1.2.5. Gandhian Approach UNIT: II South Asia: State and Economy 2.1. Political Economy of the British Raj (1857-1947) 2.2. Rise and Growth of Economic Nationalism 2.3. Post-Colonial State and Economic Development in South Asia 2.4. Liberalisation and Globalisation UNIT: III Energy Outlook: South Asia 3.1. Energy Outlook for South Asia 3.2. Energy Security and Pipeline Politics 3.3. Trans-Boundary Water Sharing Issues 3.4. Indus Water Treaty: Emerging Challenges UNIT: IV Regional Economic Cooperation 4.1. South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC): SAPTA to SAFTA 4.2. Nature of Conflict in South Asia: Implications for Regional Economic Integration 4.3. Imperatives of Reviving Intra-Regional and Inter-Regional Trade Routes 4.4. Cross-Line of Control Trade: Peace Building and Economic Potential

14 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Reading List    

                  

 

Ahmed Sadiq. (ed.), Promoting Economic Cooperation in South Asia, New Delhi, Sage, 2010. Amartya Sen, Development as Freedom,Oxford University Press, 1999. _________ Poverty and Famines: An Essay on Entitlement and Deprivation, Oxford University Press, 1981. Arblaster, A. ‘The Rise and Decline of Western Liberalism’ in Lal, D. Reviving the Invisible Hand: The Case for Classical Liberalism in the Twentyfirst Century, Princeton University Press, 2006. Anshuman Gupta, SAARC: SAPTA to SAFTA, Shipra Publications, Delhi, 2002. Bose, Sugata and Ayesha Jalal. Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy. New Delhi, Oxford University Press, 1997. Chandra Bipan, The Rise and Growth of Economic Nationalism in India, Anamika Publishersand distributors 2004. David N. Balaam and Michael Veseth. “What is IPE” in Introduction to International Political Economy, New Jersey, Pretice Hall, 2001. Desai, A.R. (ed.), Peasant Struggles in India, Bombay: Oxford University Press, 1979. Garmer B.H. An Introduction to South Asia, London, Routledge, 1993. Ghosh Partha. Cooperation and Conflict in South Asia, New Delhi, Manohar, 1995. Ghosh, B.N. Gandhian Political Economy: Principles, Practice and Policy. Ashgate Publishing Limited, 2007. Gilpin, R. Global Political Economy: Understanding the International Economic Order, Orient Longman, 2003. Jalal, Ayesha. Democracy and authoritarianism in South Asia: A comparative and historical perspective, U.K., Cambridge University Press, 1995. Jean Dreze and Amartya Sen, An Uncertain Glory: India and its Contradictions, Allen Lane, 2013. John Baylis and Steve Smith. (ed.), The Globalization of World Politics, (4th edition), Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Kersbergen, K.V. and Manow, P. Religion, Class Coalition and Welfare State, Cambridge University Press, 2009. Khan, Shaheen Rafi. (ed.), Regional Trade Integration and Conflict Resolution, Routledge, 2009. Kodikara Shelton U. (ed.), External Compulsions of South Asian Politics, New Delhi, Sage, 1993. Mandel, E. An Introduction to Marxist Economic Theory, Pathfinder Press, New York, 1979. Regional Report, ‘Regional Energy Security for South Asia’. Available at: www.sarienergy.org Shelton, Kodikara, U. (ed.), South Asian Strategic Issues, New Delhi, Sage, 1990. Stern Robert W. Democracy and Dictatorship in South Asia, New Delhi, India Research Press, 2001. Semester I 15



Yunus Mohammed, Parmar Aradhana. South Asia: A Historical Narrative, Karachi, Oxford University Press, 2006.

16 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Course Title: GEOGRAPHY OF JAMMU AND KASHMIR  Course Code: KS‐04‐EA 

Credits = 4:0:0 

UNIT: I Introduction 1.1. Geographical Importance of Jammu and Kashmir 1.2. Geological Setting of Jammu and Kashmir 1.3. Physiographic Division of Jammu and Kashmir 1.4. Mountain Systems and Passes of Jammu & Kashmir UNIT: II Climate 2.1. Climate: General Climatic Conditions and Seasonal Variations 2.2. Drainage Pattern 2.3. Major Vegetation Types of Jammu and Kashmir 2.4. Natural Disasters: Earthquakes and Floods UNIT: III Demography 3.1. Demographic Profile of J & K Population Growth: Trends and Distribution 3.2. Linguistic Groups: Their Geographical Distribution 3.3. Major Tribes and Ethnic Groups: Their Geographical Distribution 3.4. Major Religious Groups: Their Geographical Distribution UNIT: IV Physiography 4.1. Physiographic Divisions: Afghanistan, Sri Lanka and Nepal 4.2. Climatic Profile; India, Afghanistan and Bangladesh 4.3. Demographic Profile of South Asian countries

Semester I 17  

Reading List          

Charles Bates, Gazetteer of Jammu and Kashmir, 1980. A. N. Raina, Geography of Jammu & Kashmir, National Book Trust, 1977. A. R. Khan, Geography of Jammu & Kashmir, Gulshan Books, 2007. Majid Hussain, Geography of Jammu & Kashmir (Some Aspects), Araine Publications, 1985. Majid Hussain, Geography of Jammu & Kashmir, Rajesh Publications, 1987. P. A. Koul, Geography of Jammu & Kashmir, Light and Life Publications, 1980. Majid Hussain, Systemic Geography of Jammu & Kashmir, APH Publication, 2005. Monis Raza, Valley of Kashmir Vol-I. M. Raja et-al, Valley of Kashmir, Vikas Publications. 1978 Walter Lawrence, Valley of Kashmir, Kejri Publications, 1967.

18 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Course Title: FRATRICIDAL VIOLENCE: SOUTH ASIAN PARTITION LITERATURE  Course Code: KS‐05‐EA                                                                                       Credits: 4:0:0  UNIT: I Partition Literature: Introduction 1.1. Defining Partition Literature 1.2. Partition Literature in the Context of South Asia 1.3. Genres of Partition Literature: Novels, Short Stories and Poetry, etc. 1.4. Stylistic Tendencies of Partition Literature UNIT: II Reading the Cultural Repercussions of the Partition through Amitav Ghosh’s The Shadow Lines 2.1. Impossible Boundaries: The Conflict of Emotion and Geo-politics 2.2. Cultural Dislocation: The History of Root through Uprootedness 2.3. Confusion of Time and Space: Memory beyond Location 2.4. The Crisis of Identity UNIT: III Psychological Impact of the Partition: Sadat Hasan Manto’s Short Stories and Sketches (in Translation) 3.1. Chronicling the Partition: Chronicling Trauma 3.2. A Scar in the Psyche 3.3. The Voice of the Wound: Narrativizing Trauma of the Partition 3.4. Truth of the Pain as Metaphor in Fiction UNIT: IV Partition in Urdu Poetry (in Translation) 4.1. “When You Rub These Words, They Catch Fire”: The Spirit of Revolution 4.2. Evidence of National Ideology in Poetry 4.3. Aestheticizing Atrocity 4.4. The Sacrilege of Expression

Semester I 19  

Reading List        

              

Ghosh, Amitav. The Shadow Lines. New York, NY, U.S.A: Viking, 1989. Print. Ali, Ahmed. The Golden Tradition: An Anthology of Urdu Poetry. New York: Columbia University Press, 1973. Print. Qureshi, M H. K. An Anthology of Modern Urdu Poetry. Toronto: Urdu Society of Canada, 1988. Print. Jamal, Mahmood. The Penguin Book of Modern Urdu Poetry. Harmondsworth, Middlesex, England: Penguin Books, 1986. Print. Faiẓ, Faiẓ A, and Sarvat Rahman. 100 Poems by Faiz Ahmed Faiz, 1911-1984. New Delhi: Abhinav Publications, 2002. Print. Husain, Imdad. An Introduction to the Poetry of Faiz Ahmed Faiz. Lahore: Vanguard Books, 1989. Print. Manṭo, Saʻādat H, and Khalid Hasan. Bitter Fruit: The Very Best of Saadat Hasan Manto. New Delhi: Penguin Books, 2008. Print. Flemming, Leslie A. Another Lonely Voice: The Urdu Short Stories of Saadat Hasan Manto. Berkeley: Center for South and Southeast Asia Studies, University of California, 1979. Print. Bhalla, Alok. Life and Works of Saadat Hasan Manto. Shimla: Indian Institute of Advanced Study, 1997. Print. Bhalla, Alok. Stories About the Partition of India. New Delhi: Indus, 1994. Print. Bhalla, Alok. Partition Dialogues: Memories of a Lost Home. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2006. Print. Hasan, Mushirul. India's Partition: Process, Strategy, and Mobilization. Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1993. Print. Hasan, Mushirul. Inventing Boundaries: Gender, Politics, and the Partition of India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2000. Print. Bose, Sugata, and Ayesha Jalal. Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy. London: Routledge, 2011. Print. Jalal, Ayesha. The Pity of Partition: Manto's Life, Times, and Work Across the IndiaPakistan Divide. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013. Print. Sidhwa, Bapsi. Ice-candy-man. London: Heinemann, 1988. Print. Rushdie, Salman. Midnight's Children: [a Novel]. New York: Knopf, 1981. Print. Didur, Jill. Unsettling Partition: Literature, Gender, Memory. Toronto [Ont.: University of Toronto Press, 2006. Internet resource. Stewart, Frank, and Sukrita P. Kumar. Crossing Over: Partition Literature from India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2007. Print. Roy, Rituparna. South Asian Partition Fiction in English: From Khushwant Singh to Amitav Ghosh. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2010. Internet resource. Desai, Anita. Clear Light of Day. New York: Harper & Row, 1980. Print. Khushwant, Singh. Train to Pakistan. New York: Grove Press, 1956. Print. Butalia, Urvashi. The Other Side of Silence: Voices from the Partition of India. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2000. Print.

20 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Course Title: KASHMIR PHILOSOPHY AND LEARNING  Course Code: KS‐06‐EA                                                                                       Credits= 4:0:0  UNIT: I Kashmir Shavism 1.1. Defining Kashmir Philosophy 1.2. Kashmir Shavism: Introduction 1.3. Buddhist Philosophy: Its Influence on Kashmir Shavism 1.4. Reasons for the Decline of Kashmir Shavism UNIT: II Kashmir’s Saivism in a Larger Context 2.1. Fundamentals of Kashmir Saivism 2.2. Comparison between Kashmir Saivism and Advaita Vedanta. 2.3. Differences between Kashmir Saivism and Hindu (Indian) Mysticism 2.4. The Unique Status of Kashmir Saivism UNIT: III Sufism in Kashmir 3.1. Rise and Early Development of Sufism 3.2. Beginning of Institutional Sufism in Kashmir 3.3. Rise of Islam in Kashmir 3.4. Sufism in Kashmir: Origin and Development UNIT: IV Mysticism in Kashmir 4.1. Concept of “Tasawuf” and Introduction to Its Schools 4.2. Mysticism in Kashmiri Sufi Poetry in the Light of the Poetry of Sufi Poets Rahman Dar,MohmoodGami, Shams Fakeer, Suachh Kral,Nyam SaabWaz Mahmood 4.3. The Rishi Poetry: A Case Study of Shaik-ul-Alam 4.4. A Comparative Study of Lal Ded and Shaik-ul-Alam

Semester I 21  

Readings List            

Introduction to Indian Philosophy by C. D. Sharma Saivism in Kashmir by Dr. Baljinath Pandit Indian Philosophy by Dr. S. Radhakrishnan (in two Vols) Sufism in Kashmir by Prof. M. Ashraf Wani Islam in Kashmir by Prof. Isaque Khan Rajatarangini edited by Aurel Stein Nilmata Puranedited by VedKumari Ghai (in two Vols) Sufi, G. M. D. 1948. Kashir. Being a History of Kashmir from the Earliest Time to Our Own. 2vols. New Delhi: Captil Publishing House, 1996 Bhuler. Dr. G. 1863. Detailed Report of a Tour in Search of Sanskrit Mss ed. Shafi Shauq. Srinagar: Jay Kay Books. 2012 Print Dutt, Jogesh Chunder, 1887. King of Kashmira, three vols. New Delhi: Low Price Publication, 1990. Print Malik, G. R Kashmiri Culture and Literature: Some Glimpses. Srinagar: Department of Kashmiri, University of Kashmir, 2007 Kapila Vatsyan, Bharata Natshastra, P.V. Kane, History of Sanskrit Poetics

22 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Course Title: LANGUAGES OF JAMMU AND KASHMIR  Course Code: KS‐07‐EA                                                                                      Credits: 4:0: 0  UNIT: I Linguistic Demography of J&K State 1.1. A Survey of Languages of the State 1.2. Languages and Dialects of Kashmir Region 1.3. Languages and Dialects of Jammu Region 1.4. Languages and Dialects of Ladakh Region UNIT: II Historical Description of the Languages Families of J&K State 2.1. Historical Description of Indo-Aryan Languages 2.2. Historical Description of Dardic Languages 2.3. Historical Description of Tibeto-Burman Languages UNIT: III Linguistic Description of the Major Languages of J&K State 3.1. Salient Features of Kashmiri Language 3.2. Salient Features of Dogri Language 3.3. Salient Features of Ladakhi Language Unit: IV Linguistic Milestones in Kashmir 4.1. Emergence: Development of Kashmiri Language 4.2. Sanskrit Period 4.3. Persian Period 4.4. Urdu Period

Semester I 23  

Readings List                       

Bamzai, P. N. K. 1962. A History of Kashmir. Delhi: Metropolitan Book Co. Bashir, Elena. 2003. Dardic. In George Cardona & Dhanesh Jain (eds.) The IndoAryan Languages. London/New York: Routledge. Bhat, Roopkrishen. 1987. A Descriptive Study of Kashmiri. Delhi: Amar Prakashan. Brightbill, Jeremy D. and Scott D. Turner. 2007. A Sociolinguistic Survey of the Dogri Language, Jammu and Kashmir. SIL Electronic Survey Report (Online). Buhler, G. 1875. Detailed Report of a Tour in Search of Sanskrit Manuscripts. London: The Royal Asiatic Society. Chatterjee, S. K. 2001. “Kashmiri Literature”. B. K. Moza (ed.) Vitasta. Kolkatta: Kashmir Bhawan. Francke, A. H. 1979. Ladakhi and Tibetan Grammar. Delhi: Seema Publications. Grierson, G. A. 1911. Standard Manual of the Kashmiri Language. 2 vols 1973. Rohtak: Light and Life Publishers. Grierson, G. A. 1909. Linguistic Survey of India Vol. III Part I. Delhi: Low Price Publications. Grierson, G.A. 1919. Linguistic Survey of India Vol.VIII Part-II 1968. Delhi: MotiLal Banarasidas. Grierson, G.A. 1919. The Linguistic Survey of India vol.VIII Part-II. 1968. Delhi: MotiLal Banarasidas. Grierson, G.A. 1906. Linguistic Survey of India vol. IX, Part-IV. 1967. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidas. Handoo, Jawaharlal. 1973. Kashmiri Phonetic Reader. Mysore: Central Institute of Indian Languages. Hannah, H. B. 1912. A Grammar of the Tibetan Language. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass. Kachru, Braj B. 1969. “Kashmiri and other Dardic Languages”. T. A. Sebeok(ed.). Current Trends in Linguistics, Vol. 5. The Hague: Mouton. Kachru, Braj B. 1969. A Reference Grammar of Kashmiri. Urbana, Illinois: Dept of Linguistics, Univ. of Illinois. Koshal, Sanyukta. 2005. Conversational Ladakhi. Delhi: Hanish & Co. Koul, M. K. et. al. 2012. A Linguistic Survey of Kashmiri Dialects-Part II. Mysore: Central Institute of Indian Languages. Koul, Omkar N. 1987. Spoken Kashmiri- A Language Course. Delhi: Indian Institute of Language Studies. Koul, Omkar N. 2003. “Kashmiri”. George Cardona and Dhanesh Jain(eds.). The Indo-Aryan Languages. London: Routledge. Koul, Omkar N. 2005. Studies in Kashmiri Linguistics. Delhi: IILS. Koul, Omkar N. and Peter Edwin Hook. (eds.) 1984. Aspects of Kashmiri Linguistics. New Delhi: Bahri Publications. Masica, Colin P. 1991. The Indo-Aryan Languages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

24 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

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Matisoff, James A. 2003. Handbook of Proto-Tibeto-Burman. London: University of California Press. Miller, R. A. 1969. The Tibeto-Burman Languages of South Asia. In T. A. Sebeok (ed.) Current Trends in Linguistics. pp. 431-49.The Hague: Mouton. Morgenstierne, Georg. 1961. “Dardic and Kafir Languages.” The Encyclopedia of Islam, New Edition, Vol.2, fasc.25.Leiden; E. J. Brill. Pushp, P. N., and K. Warikoo, eds 2004. Jammu, Kashmir, and Ladakh: Linguistic Predicament. Mar.http://www.koshur.org. Sachdeva, R. et al. 2011. A Linguistic Survey of Kashmiri Dialects Part I. Mysore: Central Institute of Indian Languages. Sharma, D. D. 2004. Tribal Languages of Ladakh pt. III. New Delhi: Mittal Publications. Vigne, G. T. 1844. Travels in Kashmir, Ladak and Iskardo (Vol 2). London: H. Colburn. Wali, Kashi and Omkar N. Koul. 1997. Kashmiri: A Cognitive Descriptive Grammar. London and New York: Routledge Zemp, Marius. 2006. Synchronic and Diachronic Phonology of the Tibetan Dialect of Kargil. Bern: Seminararbeit at the Institute of Linguistics of the University of Berne.

Semester I 25  

Course Title: CENTRAL ASIA: POLITICS AND ECONOMY  Course Code: KS‐08‐EO 

 Credits: 4:0: 0 

UNIT: I Background 1.1. Introduction to the Region 1.2. Central Asian Studies 1.3. From the Silk Road to the New Silk Road 1.4. Sociological Perspectives on Development: Change and Transformation of Nationalism in Central Asia UNIT: II Identity, Governance and Globalization 2.1. Central Asia: Identities in the making 2.1.1. Religion 2.1.2. Mobility 2.1.3. Globalization 2.2. Central Asian Politics: Governance between Past and Future UNIT: III International Factors 3.1. International Relations in Central Asia: Geopolitical Changes 3.2. Great Powers and Regional Challenges: 3.2.1. USA 3.2.2. Russia 3.2.3. China 3.3. Economic Development of Central Asia UNIT: IV Central and South Asia 4.1. India-Central Asia Relations in Historical Perspective 4.2. Trade Relations between Central Asia and Kashmir Himalayas during the Dogra Period (1846-1947) 4.3. Partition and Disruptions 4.4. Reconnecting India and Central Asia: Emerging Security and Economic Dimensions

26 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Reading List         

            

 

Adeeb Khalid. The Politics of Muslim Cultural Reform: Jadidism in Central Asia. University of California Press.1999. Ahmed Rashid. Jihad: The Rise of Militant Islam in Central Asia. Yale University Press. 2002. _______, The Resurgence of Central Asia: Islam or Nationalism?. London: Zed Books. 1994. Alexei Vassiliev (ed). Central Asia: Political and Economic Challenges in the PostSoviet Era. Saqi. 2001. Boris Z. Rumer (editor). Central Asia: A Gathering Storm? M. E. Sharpe. 2002. Christian, David. A History of Russia, Central Asia and Mongolia: Inner Eurasia from Prehistory to the Mongol Empire: Blackwell Publishers, 1999. Derek John Waller. The Pundits: British Exploration of Tibet and Central Asia. University Press of Kentucky. 2004. DeWeese, D. Islamization and Native religion in the Golden Horde. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University, 1994. Dudoignon, Stephane, and Komatsu Hisao, eds. Islam in Politics in Russia and Central Asia (Early Eighteenth to Late Twentieth Centuries). London and New York: Kegan Paul, 2001. Elizabeth Van Wie Davis; Rouben Azizian (editors). Islam, Oil, and Geopolitics: Central Asia After September 11. Rowman & Littlefield. 2006. Hafeez Malik (ed). Central Asia: Its Strategic Importance and Future Prospects. Macmillan. 1996. Hooman Peimani. Failed Transition, Bleak Future?: War and Instability in Central Asia and the Caucasus. Praeger. 2002. Hopkirk, Peter. Foreign Devils on the Silk Road. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1980. _______, Trespassers on the Roof of the World. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1982. Jo-Ann Gross (editor). Muslims in Central Asia: Expressions of Identity and Change. Duke University Press.1992. Lutz Kleveman. The New Great Game: Blood and Oil in Central Asia. Atlantic Monthly Press. 2003. Kathleen Collins. Clan Politics and Regime Transition in Central Asia. Cambridge University Press. 2006. _______, Imperial Nomads: A History of Central Asia, 500-1500. University of Pennsylvania Press. 1979. Manz, Beatrice, (ed). Central Asia in Historical Perspective. Boulder, CO: Westview, 1994. _______, “Historical Background.” In Central Asia in Historical Perspective, 1994. Martin McCauley. Afghanistan and Central Asia: A Modern History. Longman. 2002. Martha Brill Olcott. Central Asia's New States: Independence, Foreign Policy, and Regional Security. United States Institute of Peace Press. 1996. Semester I 27

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Michael Mandelbaum. Central Asia and the World: Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Turkmenistan. Council on Foreign Relations. 1994. M. Holt Ruffin; Daniel Waugh (eds). Civil Society in Central Asia. University of Washington Press. 1999. Monica Whitlock. Land Beyond the River: The Untold Story of Central Asia. Macmillan. 2003. Olga Oliker; David A. Shlapak. U.S. Interests in Central Asia: Policy Priorities and Military Roles. Rand Corporation. 2005. Olivier Roy. The New Central Asia: The Creation of Nations. I. B. Tauris. 2000. Pauline Jones Luong (editor). The Transformation of Central Asia: States and Societies from Soviet Rule to Independence. Cornell University Press. 2003. Rene Grousset. Translated by Naomi Walford. The Empire of the Steppes: A History of Central Asia. Rutgers University Press. 1988. Reuel Hanks. Central Asia: A Global Studies Handbook. ABC-CLIO. 2005. Robert Ebel; Rajan Menon (eds). Energy and Conflict in Central Asia and the Caucasus. Rowman & Littlefield. 2000. Sally N. Cummings (editor). Oil, Transition and Security in Central Asia. Routledge. 2003. Tom Everett-Heath (ed.), Central Asia: Aspects of Transition. Routledge. 2003. Vitaly V. Naumkin. Radical Islam in Central Asia: Between Pen and Rifle. Rowman & Littlefield. 2005. Wood, Frances. The Silk Road: Two Thousand Years in the Heart of Asia. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003. Dilip Hiro. Inside Central Asia: A Political and Cultural History of Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey, and Iran, Overlook TP, 2011. S. Frederick Starr. Lost Enlightenment: Central Asia's Golden Age from the Arab Conquest to Tamerlane, Princeton University Press, 2013. Igor P. Lipovsky, Central Asia: In Search of a New Identity, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2012. Alexander Cooley, Great Games, Local Rules: The New Great Power Contest in Central Asia, Oxford University Press. 2012. Sally N. Cummings, Understanding Central Asia: Politics and Contested Transformations, Routledge, 2012. Peter Hopkirk, Foreign Devils on the Silk Road: The Search for the Lost Treasures of Central Asia, John Murray, 2006. Marlaene Laruelle, Marlene Laruelle and Sebastien Peyrouse, Globalizing Central Asia: Geopolitics and the Challenges of Economic Development, M.E. Sharpe, 2012. Marlène Laruelle (ed). China and India in Central Asia: A New "Great Game"? Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Nasir Raza Khan (ed). India, Central Asia and the World Powers: New Perspectives,Primus Books, 2013.

28 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Semester II

Course Title: REGIONAL INTEGRATION IN A COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE  Course Code: KS‐09‐CR                                                                     Credits: 4:0: 0  UNIT: I Types of Integration 1.1. Defining Integration 1.2. Positive and Negative Integration 1.3. Static Customs Union Theory 1.4. Dynamic Customs Union Theory UNIT: II Historical and Comparative Perspectives on Regional Integration 2.1. The European Context 2.1.1. European Union 2.2. The American Contexts 2.2.1. NAFTA 2.2.2. Mercosur UNIT: III Regional Cooperation in Developing Countries 3.1.The Asian Contexts with Special Reference to 3.1.1. South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation 3.1.2. ASEAN 3.2.The African Contexts 3.2.1. OAU and AU

UNIT: IV Regional Cooperation and Conflict Management 4.1. Defining Conflict and Conflict Management 4.2. Major Internal Conflicts in South Asia 4.3. Conflict Management in South Asia 4.4. Regional Security in South Asia

30 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Reading List  



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Andic, Fuat, Suphan Andic Douglas Dosser (1971), A Theory of Economic Integration for Developing Countries, London: Allen and Unwin. Balassa, Bela (1961), TheTheory of Economic Integration, Westport: Greenwood Press. Baldwin, R.E. (1995) ‘What Caused the Resurgence of Regionalism? ’Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics 131: 45 Bhagwati, Jagdish (1993). ‘Regionalism and Multilateralism: An Overview’ in Jaime De Meloand Arvind Panagariya (eds.)Dimensions in Regional Integration, New York: Cambridge University Press, 122-151. Cox, Robert (ed.) (1997), TheNew Realism: Perspectives on Multilateralism and World Order, London: Macmillan and UNU Press. DeMelo, J. and A. Panagariya (1992), TheNew Regionalism in Trade Policy, Washington DC: World Bank Publication. Duffy, CharlesA. andWarner J. Feld (1980), ‘Whither Regional Integration Theory?’ in WarnerJ. Feld and Gavin Boyd (eds), Comparative Regional Systems: West and East Europe, North America, The Middle East and Developing Countries, New York: Pergamon Press. Feld, WarnerJ. and Gavin Boyd (eds) (1980), Comparative Regional Systems: West and East Europe, North America, The Middle East and Developing Countries, New York: Pergamon Press. Gamble, Andrew and Anthony Payne(eds) (1996), Regionalism and World Order, Houndmills: Macmillan. Haas, Ernst B. (1970), ‘International Integration: The European and Universal Process’ International Organization 15: 366-392. Katzenstein, Peter J. (1996), ‘Regionalism in Comparative Perspective’,Cooperation and Conflict 31 (2): 123-159. Kitamura, Hiroshi (1966), ‘Economic Theory and Economic Integration of Underdeveloped Regions’, in Miguel S. Wionczek (ed.), Latin American Integration, New York: Praeger. Lawrence, R.Z. (1996), Regionalism, Multilateralism and Deeper Integration, Washington DC: Brookings Institution. Linder, S. B. (1966), ‘Customs Unions and Economic Development’, in Miguel S. Wionczek (ed), Latin American Integration, New York: Praeger, 32-41. Mansfield, Edward D. and Helen V. Milner (eds) (1997), The Political Economy of Regionalism, New York: Columbia University Press. Mansfield, Edward D and Helen V. Milner (eds) (1999), ‘The New Wave of Regionalism’, International Organisation53 (3): 589-627.

Semester II 31  

Course Title: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH ASIA  Course Code: KS‐10‐CR                                                                      

Credits= 4: 0: 0 

UNIT: I Human Development: Concept and Measurement 1.1. Human Development: An Introduction 1.2. Dimensions of Human Development 1.3. Human Development Attributes: Sustainability, Empowerment, Equity, Productivity and Accountability 1.4. Measuring Human Development: UNDP Human Development Index, Limitations of Human Development Index UNIT: II Human Development in South Asia I 2.1. Human Development and Economic Growth 2.2. Role of Social Policy in Strengthening the Linkages between Human Development and Economic Growth 2.3. Human Development Attainments and Failures: 2.3.1. India 2.3.2. Pakistan 2.3.3. Sri Lanka UNIT: III Human Development in South Asia II 3.1. Human Development Attainments and Failures in: 3.1.1. Afghanistan 3.1.2. Bangladesh 3.1.3. Bhutan 3.1.4. Maldives 3.1.5. Nepal 3.2. Emergence of SAARC and Human Development Concerns UNIT: IV Human Development in India (J&K) 4.1. Inter-State Study of Human Development in India 4.2. Human Development in J&K 4.3. Free Education and Human Development in J&K 4.4. Intra-State Variations

32 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Reading List             



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Adil Najam, Environment, Development and Human Security: Perspectives from South Asia, University Press of America, 2003. Bob Bradnock and Glynn Williams, South Asia in a Globalising World: A Reconstructed Regional Geography, Routledge, 2002. Diane Papalia (ed.) Human Development, McGraw-Hill, 2008. Doris Bergen, Human Development: Traditional and Contemporary Theories, Pearson, 2007. Dr. William Molnar III, Principles of Human Development, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013. Hari Mohan Mathur, Displacement and Resettlement in India: The Human Cost of Development, Routledge, 2013. Mahbub ul Haq, Human Development in South Asia 2007: A Ten-year Review, Oxford University Press, 2009. Martha C. Nussbaum, Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach, Belknap Press, 2013. _______ Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach, Cambridge University Press, 2001. Moazzem Hossain, Rajat Kathuria and Iyanatul Islam, South Asian Economic Development, (2nd edition), Rutledge, 2010. Neil J. Salkind, An Introduction to Theories of Human Development, Sage, 2004. Pradumna B Rana and John Malcolm Dowling, South Asia: Rising to the Challenge of Globalization, World Scientific, 2009. Ramesh Thakur and Oddny Wiggen (eds.), South Asia in the World: Problem Solving Perspectives on Security, Sustainable Development, and Good Governance, United Nations University Press, 2004. Rattan Lal, Mannava V.K. Sivakumar, S.M.A. Faiz, A.H.M. Mustafizur Rahman and Khandakar R. Islam (eds.), Climate Change and Food Security in South Asia, Springer, 2011. Sadiq Ahmad, Explaining South Asia’s Development Success: The Role of Good Policies, The World Bank, 2006. Samiul Hasan,The Muslim World in the 21st Century: Space, Power, and Human Development, Springer, 2012. Selim Jahan, Measurements of Human Development: Seven Questions, Oxford : 13 September 2000 The Mahbub ul Haq Human Development Centre, Human Development in South Asia 2006: Poverty in South Asia: Challenges and Responses, Oxford University Press, 2008. _______ Human Development in South Asia 2009: Trade and Human Development in South Asia, Oxford University Press, 2010. _______ Human Development in South Asia 2008: Technology and Human Development in South Asia, Oxford University Press, 2010. Semester II 33

 

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_______ Human Development in South Asia 2000: The Gender Question, Oxford University Press, 2001. United Nations, Human Development Report 2013: The Rise of the Global South Human Progress in a Diverse World, United Nations, 2013. V.T. Patil, Human Rights Development in South Asia, Authors Press, 2013.

34 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Course Title: GOVERNANACE AND DEVELOPMENT   Course Code: KS‐11‐CR 

Credits = 4:0:0 

UNIT: I Governance: A Conceptual Framework 1.1. Evolution of the Concept of Governance 1.2. Key Concepts in Governance 1.3. Major Theories of Governance: 1.3.1. Rational Choice 1.3.2. New Public Management UNIT: II Governance in India 2.1. State and its Capacity 2.2. Administrative Reforms in India: Policy Prescription and Outcome 2.3. The Rule of Law and Access to Justice 2.4. Corporate Governance UNIT: III Challenges to Governance in South Asia 3.1. Rise in Ethnic Conflicts 3.2. Politicization of Armed Force 3.3. Environment and Water Governance 3.4. Decentralized Governance: Urban and Rural UNIT: IV Contextualizing Governance in J&K 4.1. Inadequacy of Democratic Process 4.2. Working of Institutions of Governance 4.3. Working of Political Parties 4.4. Critical Evaluation of Commissions and Committees

Semester II 35  

Reading List               

Baghel C.L. &Yogendra Kumar, Good Governance: Concept and Approaches, Kanishka Publishers, New Delhi, 2006. Barathwal C.P.(ed), Good Governance in India, Deep and Deep Publications Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi,2003. BevirMark(ed.), Encyclopedia of Governance, Part I, Sage Publications Inc, California; 2007. Bevir Mark, Democratic Governance, Princeton University Press, New Jersey; 2010. Bevir Mark, Key Concepts in Governance, Sage Publications Ltd, London, 2009. ChakrabartyBidyut and Mohit Bhattacharya, The Governance Discourse-A Reader, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2008. Jain, R.B. (ed), Globalization and Good Governance: Pressures for Constructive Reforms, Deep and Deep Publications, New Delhi,2005. Jalan Bimal, The Future of India: Politics, Economics and Governance, Penguin, New Delhi, 2005. Jayal, NirajaGopal, et. al(eds.), Essays on Gender and Governance, UNDP,2003. Kashyap Subhash C.(ed), Crime and Corruption to Good Governance, Uppal Publishing House, New Delhi, 1997. Kjaer Anne Mette, Governance, Polity Press, Cambridge, 2004. Medury Uma, Public Administration in the Globalization Era, Orient Blackswan Private Limited, New Delhi, 2010. Munshi Surendra and Biju Paul Abraham (eds.) Good Governance, Democratic Societies and Globalization, Sage Publications, New Delhi, 2004. Pierre, John (ed.), Debating Governance: Authority, Steering and Democracy, 2000. Sahani Pradeep andUma Medury(eds.), Governance For Development: Issues and Strategies, Prentice Hall of India Private Limited, New Delhi, 2003.

36 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Course Title: ECONOMY OF JAMMU AND KASHMIR  Course Code: KS‐12‐EA 

Credits = 4:0:0 

UNIT: I Introduction 1.1. Main Features of Jammu & Kashmir Economy 1.2. Political Economy of Development in Jammu & Kashmir Economy 1.2.1. 1944 New Kashmir Manifesto 1.2.2. Land Reforms (1950 and 1976) 1.3. Decentralized Economy UNIT: II Jammu & Kashmir: Macro Economic Scenario 2.1. Behavior of SGDP and Per Capita SGDP since 1950 2.1.1. District Domestic Product: Methodology, Behavior and Attainments 2.2. Sectoral Composition of SGDP: Inter-Temporal Changes and their Implications 2.3. Behavior of Savings and Investments in the State of Jammu & Kashmir 2.4. Unemployment in the State Magnitude and Dimensions 2.5. Educated Employment: A Study of Education Employment Linkages UNIT: III Agriculture and Industry 3.1. Agriculture and Horticulture Sectors in J&K: Development and Potential 3.2. Forests in J&K: Problems, Prospects and Developmental Initiatives 3.3. Industrial Sector in the State: Scope, Issues and Policies; Appraisal of PSU’s in Jammu and Kashmir; Role of Private sector in the Industrial Sector 3.4. Tourism: Tourism in Jammu, Kashmir and Ladakh regions; In-flow, Revenue, and Developmental Initiatives UNIT: IV Infrastructure 4.1. Physical Infrastructure: Road Network, Expansion of Railways in Jammu and Kashmir, Development of Airports in the State 4.2. Power Sector: Generation and Reforms 4.3. Social Infrastructure: Health and Educational Infrastructure in J&K: An Overview 4.4. Higher Education and Knowledge Economy: Issues and Concerns

Semester II 37  

Reading List       

Singh, J. 2004. The Economy of Jammu and Kashmir. Radha Krishnan Anand & Co. Jammu DES, Digest of Economics and Statistics, latest issue, Government of J&K, Srinagar. DES, Indicators of Regional Development 2007-08, Government of J&K, Srinagar. Godbholey Committee Report on Economic Reforms for J&K.1998, Government of J&K, Srinagar Bhat M.S & M L Misri (1994), Poverty planning and Economic Change in J&K .Vikas publishing House Bakshi. S. R, (2002), History of Economic Development in Kashmir,Gulshan Publishers J&K Khan J. I. Jammu and Kashmir Economy (2012). The Directorate of Distance Education, University of Kashmir. ISSN NO: 978-938209-7-655

38 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Course Title: FOLK‐LORE AND ORAL LITERATURE OF KASHMIR  Course Code: KS‐13‐EA 

Credits = 4:0:0 

UNIT: I Nature and Scope of Folk-Lore 1.1. Folk-Lore: Definition, Features and Functions 1.2. Folk-Lore: History 1.3. Folk-Lore: Historical, Social and Cultural Significance 1.4. Folk-Lore and Gender UNIT: II Folk-Lore in Practice 2.1. Oral Literature: Scope and Significance 2.2. Folk Genres with Special Reference to Kashmir: Theatre, Songs, Aphorisms 2.3. Folk-Lore: Rituals, Beliefs and Practices with Special Reference to Kashmir 2.4. Folk-Lore: Evidence of Cultural Specificities UNIT: III Folk Lore: A Repertoire of Kashmir Heritage 3.1. Folk-Lore: A Historical Continuum vis-à-vis Kashmir 3.2. Folk-Lore: Philosophical-Religious Dimensions in Kashmir 3.3. Folk-Lore and the Politics of the Governed 3.4. Folk-Lore: The Art of Subaltern UNIT: IV Folk Performing Arts 4.1. Folk-Lore: Festivals 4.1.1. Kashmir: Bhand Pather, Dambali 4.1.2. Jammu: Bhagatan, Kud 4.1.3. Ladakh: Lehshone, Zabru

Semester II 39  

Reading List 

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Bluestein Gene, The Voice of the Folk, Masscuetts: The University of Massauchets Press 1972. Boas Frace Langauge and Culture, New York 1955. Crooke W, An Introduction to Popular Religion and Folklore of Northern India, Allahabad 1894. Deva Indra, Folk Culture and Peasant Society in India, Rawat Publications, Jaipur 1989. DharSomnath, Kashmiri Folktales, Hindu Kitab 1949. Dundas Allen (ed), A study of Folklore, Englewood Cliffs, Princeton Hall, New Jersey 1965. Fayaz Farooq, Kashmiri Folk Lore, Historical Perspective, Gulshan Books, Srinagar, 2009. Folk Lore and History, Srinagar. Hatim’s Tales, Reprint Srinagar. Islam Mazharul, Folklore: The Pulse of People, New-Delhi, Concept Publishing House 1985. Kemmu M.L, Bhand Natyam, Srinagar. Knowels J. H. A Dictionary of Kashmiri Proverbs, Reprint Srinagar. Zaban, Adab-t-Tawarikh, Srinagar.

 

Journals Anhaar, Folklore Number, P.G. Department of Kashmiri, University of Kashmir. Sheeraza, Folklore Number, J&K Academy of Art, Culture and languages, Srinagar

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40 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Course: HISTORY AND AESTHETICS IN KASHMIR  Course Code: KS‐14‐EA 

Credits = 4:0:0 

UNIT: I Aesthetics 1.1. Introduction to the Philosophical Theories: 1.1.1. Rasa 1.1.2. Dhavani 1.2. Introduction to Alankar School of Indian Aesthetics 1.3. Contribution of Kashmiri Aesthetics to Alankar School UNIT: II Contribution 2.1. Contribution of Anandvardhan, Abhinavgupta and Mammata 2.2. Significance of Alankars in Poetry 2.3. Defining Imagination: 2.3.1. Sattarka 2.3.2. Bhavana 2.3.3. Avadhana UNIT: III History 3.1. Socio-cultural History of Kashmir as reflected in NilmataPurana 3.2. History of Kashmir as Depicted in Rajatarangini of Kalhan, Jonaraja and Srivara 3.3. Rise and Early Development of Sufism 3.4. Beginning of Institutional Sufism in Kashmir UNIT: IV Contribution II 4.1. Contribution of Kashmir to History and Historiography. 4.1.1. Ancient 4.1.2. Medieval 4.1.3. Modern

Semester II 41  

Readings List            

Sufi, G. M. D. 1948. Kashir. Being a History of Kashmir from the Earliest Time to Our Own. 2vols. New Delhi: Captil Publishing House, 1996 Bhuler. Dr. G. 1863. Detailed Report of a Tour in Search of Sanskrit Mss ed. Shafi Shauq. Srinagar: Jay Kay Books. 2012 Print Dutt, Jogesh Chunder, 1887. King of Kashmira, three vols. New Delhi: Low Price Publication, 1990. Print Malik, G. R Kashmiri Culture and Literature: Some Glimpses. Srinagar: Department of Kashmiri, University of Kashmir, 2007 Kapila Vatsyan, Bharata Natshastra, P.V. Kane, History of Sanskrit Poetics Introduction to Indian Philosophy by C. D. Sharma Saivism in Kashmir by Dr. Baljinath Pandit Indian Philosophy by Dr. S. Radhakrishnan (in two Vols) Sufism in Kashmir by Prof. M. Ashraf Wani Islam in Kashmir by Prof. Isaque Khan Rajatarangini edited by Aurel Stein Nilmata Puran edited by VedKumari Ghai (in two Vols)

42 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Course Title: ENVIRONMENT: POLITICS AND POLICY  Course Code: KS‐15‐EA 

Credits = 4:0:0 

UNIT: I Introduction 1.1. Environment: Concept and Nature of Discourse 1.2. Traditional Society and the Concern for Environmental Protection 1.3. Environment Policy with Special Reference to Laws and Constitution 1.4. Environment Related Laws in Jammu and Kashmir: A Brief Overview UNIT: II Constitutional Provisions and the Environment 2.1. Fundamental Norms 2.2. Division of Legislative Authority 2.3. The Forty-Second Amendment Act 2.4. The Directive Principles of State Policy 2.5. Article 253 and Environment Legislation UNIT: III Global Environmental Politics (Cross-Cutting Issues) 3.1. Environment and Development 3.2. The North-South Divide 3.3. Environment and Trade 3.4. Environment and Security UNIT: IV Global Climate Change Politics 4.1. From Rio to the Kyoto Protocol 4.2. The Post-Kyoto Negotiations 4.3. Developing Countries: Concerns and Issues UNIT: V National Environment Policy 5.1. Conservation of Critical Environment Resources 5.2. Intra-general Equity: Livelihood and Security for Poor 5.3. Integration of Environmental Concerns in Economic and Social Development

Semester II 43  

Reading List                      

Acharyya, Rajat, Trade and Environment. New Delhi, Oxford University Press, 2013 Barbara Epstein, Political Protest and Cultural Revolution: Nonviolent Direct Action in the 1970s and 1980s (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991). Bilsky, L. J., Historical Ecology: Essays on Environment and Social Change. Port. Washington, NY: Kennikat Press, 1980. Bramwell, A., Ecology in the 20th Century: A History. New Haven, Ct.: Yale University Press, 1989. Dunlap, T., Scientists, Citizens, and Public Policy. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1981. Christopher J. Bosso, Pesticides and Politics. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1987. Goudie, A., The Human Impact on the Natural Environment. Cambridge, Ma: MIT Press, 1986. Greve, Michael S., and Fred L. Smith, Environmental Politics. New York: Praeger Publishers, 1992. Guha, Sumit, Environment and Ethnicity In India, 1200–1991. Cambridge: Cambridge Studies, 2006 Hadden, S. G., A Citizens Right to Know: Risk Communication and Public Policy. Boulder, CO.: Westview, 1989. Hussain, Zahid and L. Cajee, Water Crises in the Indian Subcontinent. Shillong: BOOKWELL & North-Eastern Hill University, 2012. Jerome C. Rose, ed., Legal Foundations of Environmental Planning, (New Brunswick: Center for Urban Policy Research, 1974). Lynton K. Caldwell, Environmental Impact Analysis: Origins, Evolutions, and Future Direction," Policy Studies Review, Vol. 8, No. 1 (Autumn 1988), pp. 75-83. Lynton Keith Caldwell, The National Environmental Policy Act: An Agenda for the Future. Indiana University Press, 1998. Ozturk, M., Urbanisation, Land Use, Land Degradation and Environment. New Delhi: Daya Publication House, 2011. Paehlke, Robert, Environmentalism and the Future of Progressive Politics. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1989. Rangarajan, Mahesh, Environment Issues in India: A Reader. New Delhi: Longman, 2011 Samal, K., Environment: Displacement and Resettlement. New Delhi: SSDN Publishers, 2011. Thomas More Hoban and Richard Oliver Brooks, Green Justice: The Environment and the Courts. Boulder: Westview, 1987. Shivaramakrishnan, M. and Ujjwal Jana, Ecological Criticism for Our Times: Literature, Nature and Critical Enquiry. New Delhi, South Asia Books, 2013. Sinha, Ratnakar, Environment Refugee. New Delhi: Prakashan, Aarti, 2012. William J. Baumol & Wallace E. Oates. The Theory of Environmental Policy. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1988.

44 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Course Title:  KASHMIR AND CENTRAL ASIA IN A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE  Course Code: KS‐16‐EO  Credits = 4:0:0  UNIT: I Introduction 1.1. Beyond Region Centric Bunkers: The Unitary View of History and Situating the History of J & K 1.2. Central Asia: A Hub of Ancient and Medieval Civilizations 1.3. J & K’s Access to Central Asia: Geographical Contiguity and Routes UNIT: II Contacts with Central Asia and the Global Foundations of Early Kashmir Culture 2.1. Immigrations, Settlements and the Making of Neolithic and Megalithic Cultures of Kashmir 2.2. Coming of Aryans and Culture Change 2.3. Bactrian Greeks: 2.3.1. Sakas 2.3.2. Parthians 2.3.3. Kushans and Huns in J & K 2.3.4. Introduction of ‘Global’ Civilization UNIT: III Kashmir’s Contribution to the Spread of Buddhism in Central Asia, China and Tibet 3.1. Contacts with Central Asia: From Karkotas to Loharas 3.2. Central Asia and Islam in Kashmir 3.3. Sufis and Sufism in Kashmir 3.4. Sufism and Popular Religion UNIT: IV Trade: 4.1. Trade Relations with Central Asia up to the Beginning of Twentieth Century 4.2. Colonial Rivalries and Their Impact on Kashmir’s Relation with Central Asia 4.3. Introduction of Central Asian Science, Technology and Culture During the Medieval Period 4.4. Kashmir and Silk Route

Semester II 45  

Reading List               



Eric Hobbsbawn, On History, London 1997. Marc Bloch, The Historians Craft, New York 1953. Fernand Braudel, Identite de la, France: I Espaces et al historie Paris, 1983. History of Civilizations of Central Asia, UNESCO Publishing, 6 Vols. S. L. Shali, Kashmir: History and Archaeology Through the Ages, Indus Publishing Company, Delhi, 1993. P. C. Bagchi, India and China: A Thousand Years of Cultural Relations, Saraswati Library, Calcutta, 1981. Advaitavadini Kaul, Buddhist Savants of Kashmir: Their Contribution Abroad, PhD Thesis, University of Kashmir, Srinagar. Mohibul Hassan, Kashmir Under Sultans, Akbar Books, Delhi, (Reprinted Ed.) 2005. M Ishaq Khan, History of Srinagar, 1846-1947: A Study in Socio-Cultural Change, Amir Publications, Srinagar, 1977. _______ “Persian Influences in Kashmir in the Sultanate Period” in Islamic Culture, Hyderabad, January, 1977. M. Ashraf Wani, Islam in Kashmir, Oriental Publishing House, 2005. Fida Hussain, British Policy Towards Kashmir 1846-1946, Gulshan Books, 2004. Warikoo K, Ladakh’s Trade Relations with Tibet under the Dogras, China Report Vol. 26, No. 2, P.143. Satish Chander Saxena, Trade in Ladakh, 1842-1947, Delhi 2006. Aman Ashraf Wani, Exogenous Influences in Kashmir from Prehistoric Times up to the Beginning of the Christian Era, M.Phil Dissertation CCAS, University of Kashmir. _______ “Kashmir Realtions with Neighbouring World during the Ancient Period in Kashmir” Journal of Social Sciences Vol.3, 2008-09

46 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies  

Semester III 

CourseTitle:GENDERANDSOCIETYINSOUTHASIA CourseCode:KSͲ17ͲCR

Credits=4:0:0

UNIT: I Gender in Sociological Analysis 1.1. Approaches to the Study of Gender 1.2. Feminist Perspective: Liberal and Radical 1.3. Postmodern Perspective 1.4. Gender in International Relations: The Nature of Debate UNIT: II Hegemonic Masculinities: Gendered Concepts 2.1. State 2.2. Sovereignty 2.3. Nationalism 2.4. Religion UNIT: III Gender and Conflict 3.1. Gender: Conceptions, Notions and Multiple Identities in Conflict Situations 3.2. Militarization of Women’s lives 3.3. Sex Trafficking and Politics of Security 3.4. Gender: Conflict and Migration UNIT: IV Issues of Women in Kashmir and South Asia 4.1. Women and Economy 4.2. Women and Violence 4.3. Women’s Movements in South Asia 4.4. Women’s Movements with Special Reference to Jammu and Kashmir

48 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

Reading List x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

x

x

x x x

Ardener, E. 1975. “Belief and the Problem of Women” and “The Problem Revisited”, in S. Ardener (ed.), Perceiving Women, London: Malaby Press. Barrett, M. 1980. Women's Oppression Today, London: Verso. (Chapters 1 to 4, and 6). Bazaz, P. N. 1959. Daughters of the Vitasa: A History of Kashmir Women form Early Times to the Present Day. New Delhi: Kashmir Book Co Boserup, E. 1974. Women's Role in Economic Development, New York: St. Martin's Press. (Part I). Dabla, B. A. 2007. Multi-dimensional Problems of Women in Kashmir. New Delhi: Gyan Book Pvt Ltd De Beauvoir, S.1983. The Second Sex, Harmondsworth: Penguin. (Book Two). Douglas. M. 1970 Purity and Danger, Harmondsworth: Penguin. Engels, F.1972. The Origin of the Family, Private Property and, the State, London: Lawrence and Wishart. Hershman, P. 1977. “Virgin and Mother” in I.M. Lewis (ed.). Symbols and Sentiments: Cross-Culture Studies in Symbolism, London: Academic Press. Hirschon, R. 1984 “Introduction: Property, Power and Gender Relations” in R. Hirschon (ed.). Women and Property. Women as Property, Beckenham: Croom Helm. Jaggar, A. 1983. Feminist Politics and Human Nature, Brighton: The Harvester Press. Leacock, E. 1978. “Women’s Status in Egalitarian Societies: Implications for Social Evolution”, Current Anthropology, 19(2), pp. 247-75. MacCormack, C. and M. Strathern (ed.). 1980 Nature, Culture and Gender, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Chapter I). Mead, M. 1935. Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies, New York: William Morrow. Meillassoux, C. 1981. Maidens, Meals and Money, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, (Part I). Reiter, R. R. (ed.) 1975. Towards an Anthropology of Women, New York: Monthly Review Press, (Articles by Draper and Rubin; other articles may be used for illustration). Rogers, S.C. 1975. “Female Forms of Power and the Myth of Male Dominance: A Model of Female/Male Interaction in Peasant Societies”, American Ethnologist, 2(4), pp. 727-56. Rosaldo, M. Z. and L. Lamphere (ed.). 1974 Women, Culture and Society, Stanford: Stanford University Press, (Articles by Rosaldo, Chodorow, Ortner; other articles may be used for illustration). Shafi, Aneesa. 2002. Working Women in Kashmir: Problems and Prospects: New Delhi: APH Publishing Sharma, U. 1980. Women, Work and Property in North West India, London: Tavistock. Uberoi, J. P. S. 1961. “Men, Women and Property in Northern Afghanistan” in S.T. Semester III 49



x x

x x

Lokhandawala (ed), India and Contemporary Islam, Simla: Indian Institute of Advanced Study.pp. 398-415. Vatuk, S. 1982. “Purdah Revisited: A Comparison of Hindu and Muslim Interpretations of the Cultural Meaning of Purdah in South Asia”, in H. Papanak and G. Minault (eds.). Separate World: Studies of Purdah in South Asia, Delhi: Chanakya. Yalman, N.1963 “On the Purity of Women in the Castes of Ceylon and Malabar”, Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, pp. 25-58. Young, K. C.Wolkowitz and R.McCullagh (eds.). 1981 Of Marriage and the Market: Women's Subordination in International Perspective, London: CSE Books, (Articles by O. Harris, M. Molyneux).

50 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

CourseTitle:PEACEANDCONFLICTSTUDIES CourseCode:KSͲ18ͲCR

Credits=3:0:0

UNIT: I Introduction 1.1. The Origins and Development of Peace and Conflict Studies 1.2. Growth and Development of Peace and Conflict Studies in South Asia 1.3. A Global System for Peace 1.4. Peace and Conflict: Key Concepts UNIT: II Theories of Peace 2.1. Democratic Peace Theory 2.2. Active Peace Theory 2.3. World Systems Theory 2.4. Post-Structural Theory UNIT: III Conflict Management and Transformation 4.1. The Civilisation of Conflict: Constructive Pacifism as Guiding Notion for Conflict Transformation 4.2. Assessing the State-of-Art in Conflict Transformation 4.3. Conflict Transformation: A Multi-Dimensional Task 4.3.1. Negotiation 4.3.2. Diplomacy 4.3.3. Dialogue 4.4. Case Studies: Northern Ireland and Sri-Lanka

Semester III 51 

Reading List x x x x x x x x x x x x

x

x

Anderson, Mary, 1999, Do No Harm: How Aid Can Support Peace – or War, Boulder and London: Lynne Rienner Publishers. Boasson, Charles, 1991, In Search of Peace Research, (edited by Peter van den Dungen), London: Macmillan. Boulding, Kenneth, 1982, ‘The War Trap’ in Richard Falk et al. Toward a Just World Order, Boulder: Westview. Camus, Albert, 1957, ‘Banquet Speech’, http://www.nobel.se/literature/laureates/1957/ camus-speech.html. Galtung, Johan, 1980, The True Worlds, New York: Free Press. Hoffmann, Stanley, 1981, Duties Beyond Borders, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press. Lawler, Peter, 1995, A Question of Values: Johan Galtung’s Peace Research, Boulder: Lynne Rienner. Machel, Graca, 1996, Impact of Armed Conflict on Children, http://www.unicef.org/graca. Mack, Andrew, 1985, Peace Research in the 1980s, Canberra: Australian National University. Patomaki, Heikki, 2001, ‘The Challenge of Critical Theories: Peace Research at the Start of the New Century’, Journal of Peace Research, vol. 38, no. 6, 723-737. Rogers, Paul and Ramsbotham, Oliver, 1999, ‘Then and Now: Peace Research-Past and Future, Political Studies, vol. 47, no. 4, 740-754. Scherrer, Christian P., 2001, Peace Research for the 21s t Century: A Call for Reorientation and New Priorities, Institute for Research in Ethnicity and Conflict Resolution. Singer, J. David, 1991, ‘The Peace Research Movement: A Conscientious Objection’, in Jaap Nobel, ed., The Coming of Age of Peace Research, Groningen: Styx Publications. Wallensteen, Peter, 2001, The Growing Peace Research Agenda, Notre Dame: Kroc Institute Occasional Paper 21. http://www.nd.edu/~krocinst/ocpapers/op_24_4.pdf.

52 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

CourseTitle:SEMINAR CourseCode:KSͲ19ͲCR

Credits=0:0:1

Semester III 53 

CourseTitle:GLOBALISATIONANDSOUTHASIA CourseCode:KSͲ20ͲCR

Credits=4:0:0

UNIT: I Conceptions and Perspectives on Globalisation 1.1. Defining Global, Globalism and Globalisation 1.2. Debates on Globalisation: 1.2.1. Hyperglobalists 1.2.2. Sceptics 1.2.3. Transformationalists UNIT: II Understanding Globalisation 2.1 Dimensions of Globalisations: Cultural, Economic, Geographic, Technological 2.2 Contemporary Global Actors: 2.2.1. United Nations 2.2.2. World Trade Organisation 2.2.3. Group of 77 2.2.4. International Monetary Fund and World Bank, 2.2.5. Transnational Corporations UNIT: III Globalisation and Development Dilemmas in South Asia 3.1. Asymmetric Economic Growth, Poverty and Human Security 3.2. Development and Displacement 3.3. Cultural and Ethnic Issues 3.4. Gender 3.5. Liberalisation and Privatisation in Education System UNIT: IV South Asia in a Globalising World 4.1. Information Technology Revolution and Debates on Sovereignty 4.2. South Asia and the Global Actors: UN, WTO, IMF, World Bank, G-77 and TNCs 4.3. Asymmetric Intra- and Inter-Regional Trade Relations 4.4. Migration 4.5. Ecological Issues

54 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

Reading List x x x x x x x x x x x

x x x x x x x x x x

Adams, N.B. (1993), Worlds Apart: The North-South Divide and the International System, London: Zed. Archibugi, Daniele and Jonathan Mitchie (eds) (1997), Technology, Globalisation and Economic Performance, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Barbora, Sanjay et al. (2008), “Migration Matters in South Asia: Commonalities and Critiques”, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 43, No. 24, pp. 57-65. Bhattacharya, Mita et al. (2004), South Asia in the Era of Globalisation: Trade, Industrialisation and Welfare, New York: Nova Publishers. Dunning, John A, (ed) (1998), Globalisation, Trade and Foreign Direct Investment, UK: Elsevier Science. El-Ojeili, Chamsi and Patrick Hayden (2006), Critical Theories of Globalisation, London: Palgrave Macmillan. Enloe, Cynthia (2007), Globalisation and Militarism: Feminists Make the Link, Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield. Ferreira, Karla (1992), World Bank and the Study of Stabilisation and Structural Adjustment in LDCs, London: London School of Economics. Gilpin, R. (2001), Global Political Economy, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Glen, J. (2007), Globalisation: North-South Perspectives, London: Routledge. Goddard, C.R. (2003), “The IMF” in Goddard, C.R. et al. (eds.), International Political Economy: State-Market Relations in a Changing Global Order, Boulder: Lynne Rienner. Held, David and Anthony McGrew, (2003), Globalisation/Anti-globalisation, Cambridge: Polity Press. Held, David and Anthony McGrew,(2003), The Global Transformations Reader, Cambridge: Polity Press. Held, David (ed.), A Globalising World: Culture, Economics and Politics, London: Routledge. Held, David et al. (1999), Global Transformations, Cambridge: Polity Press. Hirst, P. and G. Thompson (1999), Globalisation in Question, Cambridge Polity Press. Hoda, Anwarul and Ashok Gulati (2007), WTO Negotiations on Agriculture and Developing Countries, New Delhi: Oxford University Press. Hugo, Graeme (2006), “Improving Statistics on International Migration in Asia”, International Statistical Review, Vol. 74, No. 3, pp. 335-355. Katrak, Homi and Roger Strange (eds) (2004), WTO and Developing Countries, Hampshire: Palgrave. Khor, Martin, (2006), “Impasse at the WTO: A Development Perspective”, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 41, No. 45, pp. 4659-4667. Kiely, Ray (2007), The New Political Economy of Development: Globalisation, Imperialism, Hegemony, London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Semester III 55 

x

x x x x x

x x x x

x x x x x x x x x x

Kumar, Nagesh, et al. (1998), Globalisation, Foreign Direct Investment and Technology Transfers: Impacts on and Prospects for Developing Countries, London: Routledge. Lechner, F.J. and J. Boli (eds) (2004), The Globalisation Reader, Oxford: Blackwell. Mackay, H. (2004), “The Globalisation of Culture” in Held, David (ed.), A Globalising World: Culture, Economics and Politics, London: Routledge, pp. 47-84. Marchand, M.H. and Runyan, A.S. (eds) (2000), Gender and Global Restructuring: Sightings, Sites and Resistances, New York: Routledge. Peterson, V.S. and Runyan, A.S. (1999), Global Gender Issues, Boulder: Westview Press. Picciotto, R. (2003), “A New World Bank for a New Century” in Goddard, C.R. et al. (eds), International Political Economy: State-Market Relations in a Changing Global Order, Boulder: Lynne Rienner. Ravenhill, John (ed) (2008), Global Political Economy, New York: Oxford University Press. Robertson, Roland (1992), Globalisation: Social Theory and Global Culture, London: Sage. Robertson, Roland (2003), The Three Waves of Globalisation: A History of Developing Global Consciousness, London: Zed. Sapkota, Jeet Bahadur, (2011), “Mainstreaming Globalisation in Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers in the Asia-Pacific Region”, Development in Practice, Vol. 21, No. 7, pp. 999-1012. Sauvant, K. (1981), Group of 77: Evolution Structure and Organisation, New York: Oceana Publications. Scholte, J.A. (2000), Globalisation: A Critical Introduction, London: Macmillan. Shahrbanou, Tadjbakhsh and Anuradha Chenoy, (2008), Human Security, Delhi: Routledge Publishers. Steans, J. (2000), “The Gender Dimension in Held, David and Anthony McGrew, (2003), The Global Transformations Reader, Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 366-373. Stiglitz, Joseph (2002), Globalisation and its Discontents, New York: W W Norton. Stiglitz, Joseph (2006), Making Globalisation Work, New York: W W Norton. Taylor, Paul and A.J.R. Groom (eds) (2000), The United Nations at the Millennium, London: Continuum. Thomas, C. (2008), “Globalisation and Development in the South”, in Ravenhill, John (ed) (2008), Global Political Economy, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 410447. United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (1999), “Information Technology, Globalisation and Social Development”, Discussion Paper No. 114. Wade, R.H. (2008), “Globalisation, Growth, Poverty, Inequality, Resentment and Imperialism in Ravenhill, John (ed) (2008), Global Political Economy, New York: OUP, pp. 373-409.

56 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

CourseTitle:SOCIALSCIENCERESEARCHMETHODSI CourseCode:KSͲ21ͲEA

Credits=4:0:0

UNIT: I Approaches to Social Science Research 1.1. Nature, Importance and Scope of Research 1.2. Types of Research: 1.2.1. Historical 1.2.2. Analytical 1.2.3. Interdisciplinary 1.2.4. Evaluative, Participative and Action Research 1.3. Steps in Research Process: Problem Selection, Formulation and Planning UNIT: II Preparation of Research Proposal 2.1. Types of Research Design: Descriptive, Exploratory, Diagnostic, and Experimental 2.2. Concepts in Research: Variables and Attributes 2.3. Formulating Hypothesis 2.4. Overview of the Objectives UNIT: III Literature Review 3.1. Defining Literature Review 3.2. Importance and Purpose of Literature Review 3.3. Methods to Carry out a Literature Review 3.4. Summarizing the Findings UNIT: IV Categorizing Sources 3.1. Forms of Sources: Published and Unpublished 3.1.1. Newspapers, Magazines, Books, Novels, Biographies, Pamphlets 3.1.2. Personal Diaries, Letters, Interviews 3.2. Primary Sources 3.3. Secondary Sources

Semester III 57 

Reading List x x x x x x

Neuman, W.L. 2009. Understanding Research. Boston, MA: Pearson. Galtung Johan, (1974), Theory and Methods of Social Research, George Allan and Unwin Ltd., New Delhi. Kothari C.R.,(2008), Research MethodologyíMethods and Techniques, Wiley and Eastern Ltd., New Delhi. Bryman, Alan. (2004). Social Research Methods, 2nd edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Seale, Clive (ed.). (2004). Social Research Methods: A Reader. London: Routledge. Alvesson, M. and Sköldberg, K. (2000) Reflexive Methodology: New Vistas for Qualitative Research. London: Sage

58 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

CourseTitle:MEDIAANDSOCIETY CourseCode:KSͲ22ͲEA

Credits=4:0:0

UNIT: I Media and Social Institutions 1.1. Emergence and Development of Media Ownership 1.2. Relationship between Media and Society: Areas of Convergence and Conflict 1.3. Media and Social Institutions 1.4. Media and Social Responsibility UNIT: II Media and Audience 2.1. Media and its Audiences 2.2. Audiences and Media Effects 2.3. Changing Nature of Audience 2.4. Popular Culture Media Content: Construction and Representation UNIT: III Media in Times of Change 3.1. Media and Culture 3.2. Television and Cultural Images 3.3. Media and Stereotypes (Case Studies) 3.4. Media and Globalisation, Alternative and New Media 3.5. Commercialisation of Media and Public Sphere UNIT: IV Media and New Challenges 4.1. News Media and Society 4.2. Globalisation of News 4.3. Structure and Functions of News Media in Society 4.4. Mediated Interpretation of Contemporary 4.5. Issues in Society: Violence, Gender, Politics, and Development

Semester III 59 

Reading List x x x x x x x

x x

x x x x x x x

x

x

Allan, T., and J. Seaton. The Media of Conflict: War Reporting and Representations of Ethnic Violence. London: Zed Books, 1999. Arno, A., and W. Dissanayake. The News Media in National and International Conflict. London: Westview Press, 1984. Bennett, Tony. "Theories of the Media, Theories of Society." In Culture, Society and the Media, edited by Michael Gurevitch et al. London: Methuen, 1982. Boler, Megan. "Critical Media Literacy and War." In Special Issue on Media Literacy. Orbit Magazine 35(2)(May 2005). Botes, Johannes. "Extending Media Roles in Areas of Conflict." Crosslines Global Report, Vol. 28. Geneva: Crosslines Communications Ltd., 1997. Botes, Johannes. "Journalism and Conflict Resolution" Media Development 43(4) (1996). Bratic, Vladimir. "Media effects during violent conflict: Evaluating media contributions to peace building." Conflict and Communication Online 4(2)(2005). Online at http://www.cco.regeneronline.de/2006_1/abstr_engl/bratic_abstr_engl.htm. Bratic, Vladimir. "Transnational political activism and global fusion: Case study Independent Media Centers." Paper given at Media in Transition 2: globalization and convergence, May 10-12, 2002 at MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Cambridge, MA: MIT, 2002. Online at http://web.mit.edu/cms/Events/mit2/Abstracts/VladimirBratic.pdf. Burton, John. Conflict and Communication: The Use of Controlled Communication in International Relations. London; Macmillan, 1969. Carruthers, S.L. The Media at War. Communication and Conflict in the Twentieth Century. Basingstoke: MacMillan. 2000. Curran, James, and Michael Gurevitch. Mass Media and Society. London: Edward Arnold, 1991. Davidson, Walter Philips. Mass Communication and Conflict Resolution. New York: Praeger Publishers, 1993. Dyson, Rose A. Mind Abuse: Media Violence in an Information Age. Montreal: Black Rose Books, 2000. Fowler, Roger. Language in the News: Discourse and Ideology in the Press. New York: Routledge, 1991. Galtung, Johan. "On the Role of the Media in Worldwide Security and Peace." In Peace and Communication, edited by T. Varis. San Jose, Costa Rica: Universidad para La Paz, 1986. Galtung, Johan, and Mari Ruge. "Structuring and Selecting News." In The Manufacture of News: Social Problems, Deviance and the Mass Media, edited by Stanley Cohen and Jock Young. Revised edition. London: Constable, 1981. Hackett, Robert A., and Yuezhi Zhao, eds. Democratizing Global Media: One World, Many Struggles. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2005

60 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

x x

Hammond, Philip. Media, War and Postmodernity. New York: Routledge, 2007. Liebes, Tamar, James Curran, and Elihu Katz, eds. Media, Ritual and Identity. New York: Routledge, 1998.

Semester III 61 

CourseTitle:HIGHEREDUCATIONINSOUTHASIA CourseCode:KSͲ23ͲEA UNIT: I Past and Present 1.1. Colonial Education Policy 1.2. Post-Independence Policy Initiatives (India and Pakistan) 1.3. Preparing for Challenges of 21st Century 1.4. Higher Education Partnerships in South Asia UNIT: II Higher Education in India 2.1. Challenges of Equity and Quality 2.2. Expansion and Employability 2.3. National Knowledge Commission: Critical Evaluation 2.4. The Future of Higher Education UNIT: III Higher Education in Pakistan 3.1. Higher Education with Reference to Quality and Equity 3.2. Status of Social Science Education in Pakistan Universities 3.3. Public-Private Partnership in Higher Education 3.4. Challenges of Women’s Education in Pakistan UNIT: IV Higher Education Scenario in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka 4.1. Higher Education in Bangladesh: Problems and Prospects 4.2. Public-Private Partnership in Higher Education in Bangladesh 4.3. Higher Education System in Sri Lanka 4.4. Higher Education: Enrolment and Growth

62 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

Credits=4:0:0

Reading List x x x x x x x

x x x x x x x x x x

x x x

Higher Education Across Asia: An Overview of Issues and Strategies. Asian Development Bank, November 2011 Pawan Agarwal, Indian Higher Education: Envisioning the Future, Sage India, 2009 Amrik Singh, Remaking Higher Education: Essays in Dissent, HarperCollins India, 2009 Manual of UGC Schemes and Institutions of Higher Education in India George P. Alexander, Higher Education in India: Critical Issues and Trends, P Enterprises, 2006 Karuna Chanana,Transformative Links Between Higher and Basic Education: Mappin g the Field, Sage Publications Pvt Ltd, 2004 Philip G. Altbach and Suma Chitnis, eds. Higher Education Reform in India: Experience and Perspectives. Sage Publications In dia Pvt Ltd, 1993 Aly, Javed Hasan, Ministry of Education, Government of Pakistan (2006), White Paper on Education, Islamabad. Butt, Mahmood H. (2006) National Scheme of Studies, MoE, Islamabad. Government of Pakistan. National Education Policy (2009) Ministry of Education. Government of Pakistan. Policy and Planning Wing, MoE (2008) National Professional Standards for Teachers. Government of Pakistan (2005) National Education Census Report, Islamabad. Higher Education Commission, Pakistan (2005). Pakistan Accreditation Council for Teacher Education Rules, 2005. Higher Education Commission, Pakistan (2006) National Curriculum Review Committee Report on B.Ed/ BS (Hons), Islamabad. National Accreditation Council of Teacher Education, Standards for Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs in Pakistan, (2009). BANBEIS (2002) Statistical Profile on Education in Bangladesh 2001, Publication No. 350, Dhaka, November. Monirul Hoque (et,al) Final Report of the Quality Group, Report prepared for the Draft Strategic Plan for Higher Education In Bangladesh, University Grants Commission, Sept 2006. University Grants Commission (UGC) of Bangladesh, The High Powered Committee Report on the Private Universities, Dhaka. University Grants Commission, Strategic Plan for Higher Education in Bangladesh , (Final Report May 2007) World Bank (2000) Bangladesh: Education Sector Review, Volumes I-III, The University Press Limited, Dhaka.

Semester III 63 

CourseTitle:CULTURALHISTORYOFKASHMIR CourseCode:KSͲ24ͲEA

Credits:4:0:0

UNIT: I Buddhist Period 1.1. Philosophical and Intellectual Background 1.2. Development and Spread of Buddhism in Kashmir 1.3. Buddhism in Kashmir: Some Landmarks of this Period 1.4. Buddhist Architecture UNIT: II Hindu Period 2.1. Conventional and Non-Conventional Sources 2.2. Situating Saivism and Visnavaism in Kashmir 2.3. Development of Art, Architecture during the Period 2.4. Development of Institutions UNIT: III Advent of Islam and Conversion 3.1. Socio-Political Situation at the Advent of Islam in Kashmir 3.2. Emergence of Shahmir Dynasty 3.3. Development of Art, Architecture, etc. 3.4. Development of Institutions UNIT: IV Kashmiri Culture after the Sultanate 4.1. Fine Arts: Music, Painting, Sculpture, Dance, and Calligraphy 4.2. Impact of Other Cultures during the Afghan, Sikh and the British Rule 4.3. Contribution of Europeans to Cultural Studies and Learning 4.4. Advent of Mughals

64 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

Reading list x x x x x x x x

Bamzai, P.N.K. Culture and Political History of Kashmir. New Delhi: M.D. Publications, 1994. Khan, G.M. keeshryanMusalmaananhindyrasmtirivaj. Srinagar: Department of Kashmiri, 1979. Kumari, Dr. Ved. The Nilamatapurana. Srinagar: The J & K Academy of Art, Culture and Languages. 1868 Lawrence, Walter. 1895. The Valley of Kashmir. London: Oxford University Press. S.N.Pandit. Kashmir Hindu Sanskars. Jammu: Gemini Computors, 2006. Stein, M. A. (Tr.) Kalhana's Rajatarangini: A Chronicle of the Kings of Kashmir 1–3 (Reprint ed.), Srinagar, India: Saujanya Books, 2007. Sufi, G.M.D. 1948. Kashir. Being a History of Kashmir from the Earliest Times to Our Own. 2vols. New Delhi: Capital Publishing House, 1996. Sufi, G.M.D. Islamic Culture in Kashmir.Gulshan Books, Srinagar. Print.

Semester III 65 

CourseTitle:SOUTHASIANASSOCIATIONFORREGIONALCOOPERATION(SAARC) CourseTitle:KSͲ25ͲEO Credits=4:0:0 UNIT: I SAARC: An Introduction 1.1. Nature, Scope and Importance of Regional Organizations 1.2. Origin and Evolution of SAARC 1.3. Structure and Dynamics of SAARC 1.4. Aims and Objectives of SAARC UNIT: II SAARC: Goals and Achievements 2.1. SAARC Development Goals (SDG) 2.2. SAARC Social Charter 2.3. SAARC Development Fund 2.4. SAARC Chamber of Commerce & Industry Unit: III Contemporary Issues in South Asia 3.1. Internal Displacement: Issues and Concerns 3.2. Violence in South Asia 3.3. Youth Bulge: Issues and Challenges 3.4. Women Empowerment Unit: IV SAARC in a Comparative Perspective 4.1. SAARC and European Union 4.2. SAARC and Association of Southeast Asian Nations 4.3. SAARC and African Union 4.4. SAARC and Shanghai Cooperation Organization

66 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

Reading List x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

B.S. Chimni, International Refugee Law: A Reader, Sage, New Delhi, 2000. Imtiaz Alam, SAARC: South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation, South Asian Policy Analysis Network, 2006. Maurice W. Schiff and Leonard Alan Winters, Regional Integration and Development, World Bank Publications, 2003. Michael G. Plummer and Erik Jones (eds.), International Economic Integration and Asia, World Scientific, Advance Research in Asian Economic Studies Vol.3, London, 2006. Mya Than (ed.), ASEAN Beyond the Regional Crisis: Challenges and Initiatives, Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore, 2001. P.R.Chari and Sonalika Gupta (eds.), Human Security in South Asia, Social Science Press, New Delhi, 2006. Ponna Wignaraja and Akmal Hussain (eds.), The Challenges in South Asia: Development, Democracy, and Regional Cooperation, United Nations University Press, Japan, 1989. S. N. Raghavan, Regional Economic Cooperation Among SAARC Countries, Allied Publishers, New Delhi, 1995. Sagarika Dutt, India in a Globalised World, Manchester University Press, Manchester, 2006. Sajal Lahiri (ed.), Regionalism and Globalization: Theory and Practice, Routledge, London, 2001. T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Trade, Finance, and Investment in South Asia, Social Science Press, 2002. V.T.Patil and P.R. Trivedi, Refugees and Human Rights, New Delhi, Authors Press, 2000. Vernon L. B. Mendis, SAARC: Origins, Organisation and Prospects, Indian Ocean Centre for Peace Studies, 1991. Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal, Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy, Routledge, 3rd Edition, 2011. Iftikhar Dadi, Modernism and the Art of Muslim South Asia,The University of North Carolina Press, 2010.

Semester III 67 

Semester IV

TitleofCourse:TERMPAPER CourseCode:KSͲ26ͲCR

Credits=0:0:4

 ™ A committee consisting of faculty members will identify the theme for writing a ‘Term Paper’. ™ The theme for the ‘Term Paper’ for each student will be identified in line with the objectives of the Institute.

70 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

CourseTitle:PUBLICPOLICY:THEORYANDPRACTICE CourseCode:KSͲ27ͲCR

Credits=4:0:0

UNIT: I Introduction 1.1. Concept, Nature and Scope 1.2. Evolution of the Discipline 1.3. Approaches to the Study of Public Policy: 1.3.1. Group Approach 1.3.2. Incremental Approach 1.3.3. Rational Choice Approach UNIT: II Public Policy Making and Implementation 2.1. Public Policy Making 2.1.1. Process: Agenda, Policy Formulation, Adoption 2.1.2. Institutions and Actors 2.2.Public Policy Implementation 2.2.1. Implementation and Evaluation 2.2.2. Institutions and Actors UNIT: III Globalization and Public Policy 3.1. Global Policy Process 3.2. Role of Transnational Actors: 3.2.1. NGOs 3.2.2. Multinational Corporations 3.3. Impact of Globalization on Policy-Making UNIT: IV Policy Analysis and Application in India (J&K) 4.1. 4.2. 4.3. 4.4.

Education: Right to Education Women Education in Jammu and Kashmir: Beti-Anmol Health: National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) Employment: Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA)

Semester IV 71 

Reading List x x x x x x x x x x x

Anderson J.E., 2006, Public Policy-Making: An Introduction, Boston, Houghton. Birkland Thomas A., 2005, An Introduction to The Policy Process: Theories, Concepts, And Models of Public Policy Making, 2nd Edition, Armonk; M.E. Sharpe. B. Chakrabarty and P. Chand, 2012, Public Administration in a Globalizing World: Theories and Practices, New Delhi: Sage Publications. Dreze Jean and Amartya Sen, 2002, India: Development and Participation, New Delhi; Oxford University Press. ______ 2013, An Uncertain Glory: India and its Contradictions, Penguin. Dye Thomas, 2008, Understanding Public Policy, Singapore, Pearson Education. Gerston Larry N., 2004, Public Policy Making: process and principles, Armonk, M.E.Sharpe. Hill Michael, 2005, The Public Policy Process, Harlow, UK; Pearson Education, 5th Edition. Parsons Wayne, 1995, Public Policy: An Introduction to the Theory of Policy Analysis, Aldershot, U.K.; Edward Elgar. Rathod P.B., 2005, Framework of Public Policy: The Discipline and its Dimensions, New Delhi; Commonwealth. Stone Deborah, 2001, The Policy Paradox, N.Y., Norton.

72 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

CourseTitle:INDIA’SPOLICYTOWARDSITSNEIGHBOURS CourseCode:KSͲ28ͲCR

Credits=4:0:0

UNIT: I Introduction 1.1.Meaning and Objectives of India’s Foreign Policy 1.2.History and Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy 1.3.Major Actors in Foreign Policy Making 1.4.Foreign Policy in the Era of Economic Liberalization UNIT: II India’s Four Major Preoccupations 2.1. India and SAARC 2.2. India and China 2.3. India and ASEAN 2.4. India and the World UNIT: III China-South Asia Relations and India 3.1. China-Pakistan Relations: Indian Response 3.2. China-Sri Lanka Relations: Indian Concerns 3.3. China-Nepal Relations: Indian Perspective 3.4. Challenges and Opportunities UNIT: IV India’s Policy Towards its Neighbours 4.1. Linking Geography with Strategy 4.2. India-Pakistan Asymmetry 4.3. India-Pakistan and Afghanistan: Conflict and Cooperation 4.4. India’s Relation with Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka

Semester IV 73 

Reading List x

Smruti S. Pattanaik (Ed.), South Asia: Envisioning a Regional Future, Pentagon Security International, New Delhi 2011.

x

Josy Joseph , ‘Securitization of Illegal Migration of Bangladeshis To India,’ Working Paper 100, January 2006, Institute of Defence and Strategic Studies, Singapore available at http://www.rsis.edu.sg/publications/WorkingPapers/WP100.pdf.

x

Jagat Mehta, Negotiating for India: Resolving Problems through Diplomacy, New Delhi: Manohar, 2006.

x

Mohan Malik, China and India: Great Power Rivals, London: First Forum Press, 2011.

x

Yinan Zhao and Bruce Lusignan in ‘The Real Crux of Sino-Tibetan Relations’, available at http//www.stanford.edu/class/e297a/The_Real_Crux_of_SinoTibetan_Relations.

x

Jagannath P. Panda, China’s Path to Power: Party, Military and the Politics of State Transition, New Delhi: Pentagon Security International, 2010.

x

B.G. Verghese, ‘Imperatives of Connectivity’, in Asian Institute of Transport Development, Connectivity Issues in India’s Neighbourhood, Ed., New Delhi: Asian Institute of Transport Development, 2008.

x

North Eastern Region Vision 2020, Ministry of Development of North Eastern Region and North Eastern Council, Agartala, May 13, 2008.

x

Myat Thein, Economic Development of Myanmar, Singapore: ISEAS, 2004.

x

‘India Suggests Exiting Out of Tamanthi Hydel Project to Escape from China Pressure’, May 26, 2011, The Economic Times, available at at http:// articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2011-05-26/news/29586113_1_hydeltamanthiproject.

x

Tridib Chakraborti, ‘India’s New Regionalism in Asia: Look East and the Northeast’, in T. Nirmala Devi (e.d.) India and Bay of Bengal Community: The Bimstec Experiment, New Delhi: Gyan Publishing House, 2007.

74 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

CourseTitle:FEDERALISMANDDEVOLUTIONARYPROCESSINSOUTHASIA CourseCode:KSͲ29ͲEA Credits=4:0:0 UNIT: I Contextualizing Federal and Devolutionary Theory in South Asia 1.1. Managing Diversity 1.1.1 Multicultural and Multinational 1.1.2 Territorial and Ethnic UNIT: II Constitutional Foundations and Institutional Framework 2.1. Structure of government 2.2. Distribution of responsibilities 2.3. Role of Constitutional Courts UNIT: III Intergovernmental Relations 3.1. Local Self-Government 3.1.1. Rural 3.1.2. Urban UNIT: IV Foreign Relations: 4.1. Foreign Policy Making 4.2. Treaty Making 4.3. Regional Integration 4.4. Challenges of Globalisation 

Semester IV 75 

Reading List x x x x x

x x

x x

x x

x x

x

x x

Ahmad, Raza. 2010. ‘The Endemic Crisis of Federalism in Pakistan’, The Lahore Journal of Economics, 15, September: 15–31. Ahmed, Syed Jaffar. 1990. Federalism in Pakistan: A Constitutional Study, Karachi: Pakistan Study Centre. Ali, Mehrunnisa. 1996. Politics of Federalism in Pakistan, Karachi: Royal Book Company. Baxter, Craig.1974. ‘Constitution Making: the Development of Federalism in Pakistan’, Asian Survey, 14(12), December: 1074–1085. Baral, Lok Raj. 1998. ‘Ethnicity in Constitutional Reforms in Nepal’, in Iftekharuzzaman (ed.), Ethnicity and Constitutional Reform in South Asia, New Delhi: Manohar for Regional Centre for Strategic Studies, 84–107. Bhattacharyya, Harihar. 2010. Federalism in Asia: India, Pakistan, and Malaysia, London and New York: Rouledge. Cohen, Stephen P. 1982. ‘Pakistan’, in Edward A. Kolodziej and Robert E. Harkavy (ed.), Security Policies of Developing Countries, Lexington: Lexington Books, 93– 118. Coomaraswamy, Radhika. 1990. ‘The Crisis of Constitutionalism: Devolution and the Sri Lanka Constitution’, Thatched Patio, 3, May–June. Edrisinha, Rohan. 2011. ‘The Federal Debate in Sri Lanka’, in Rekha Saxena (ed.), Varieties of Federal Governance: Major Contemporary Models, New Delhi: Foundation Books. Ghai, Yash and Jill Cottrell(ed.) 2007. Federalism and State Restructuring in Nepal: The Challenges for the Constituent Assembly, Kathmandu: UNDP. ———. 2011. Ghai, Yash. 2011. Federalism and Political Inclusion: Choices Facing Nepal’, in Rekha Saxena (ed.), Varieties of Federal Governance: Major Contemporary Models, New Delhi: Foundation Books: 282–314. Ghosh, Partha S. 2003. Ethnicity versus Nationalism: The Devolution Discourse in Sri Lanka, New Delhi: Sage Publications. Hachhethu, Krishna, Sanjay Kumar, and Jiwan Subedi. 2008. Nepal in Transition: A Study of the State of Democracy, Kathmandu: DSA/Nepal Chapter and International Idea. Hachhethu, Krishna. 2007. ‘Madhesi Nationalism and Restructuring of the Nepali State’, (unpublished paper, delivered at International Seminar on ‘Constitutionalism and Diversity on Nepal’organized by the Centre for Nepal and Asian Studies, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu). International Centre for Ethnic Studies, Kandy. 1996. Devolution in Sri Lanka: S.W.R.D. Bandaranaike and the Debate on Power Sharing: Documentary Survey with an Introduction by K.M. De Silva, multiple documents. Jayawardene, J.R.1988. ‘The Democratic Option: The Solution of Ethnic Conflict in Sri Lanka’, The Parliamentarians, London, 74(1), January. Kenndy, C. 1993. ‘Managing Ethnic Conflict: The Case of Pakistan’, Regional Politics and Policy, 3(1), Spring: 138–39.

76 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

x

x

x

x x

x x x

x x

x x

x x

x

Khanal, Krishna P. 2011. ‘Federalizing the Nepali State: Challenges and Opportunities’, in Smriti S. Pattanaik (ed.), South Asia: Envisioning a Regional Future, New Delhi: Pentagon Security International. Kukreja, Veena and Mahendra Prasad Singh. 2008. ‘Sri Lanka: To Federalize or Not to Federalize?’, in Veena Kukreja and Mahendra Prasad Singh (eds), Democracy, Development, and Discontent in South Asia, New Delhi: Sage Publications. Kukreja, Veena. 2003. Contemporary Pakistan: Political Processes, Conflicts and Crisis, New Delhi, Sage Publications. Kukreja, Veena. .2011. ‘Federalism in Pakistan’, in Rekha Saxena (ed.), Varieties of Federal Governance: Major Contemporary Models, New Delhi: Foundation Books, 104–30. Lawoti, Mahendra. 2005.Towards a Democratic Nepal: Inclusive Political Institutions for a Multicultural Society, New Delhi: Sage Publications. Mahajan, Gurpreet. 2007. ‘Federal Accommodation of Ethno Cultural Identities’, in Baogang He, Brian Galligan, and Takashi Inoguchi (eds), Federalism in Asia, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 82–101. Mushtaq, Muhammad. 2009. ‘Managing Ethnic Diversity and Federalism in Pakistan’, European Journal of Scientific Research, XXXIII(2/0: 279–94. Oberst, Robert C, 1988. ‘Federalism and Ethnic Conflict in Sri Lanka’, Publius: The Journal of Federalism, 18(3) Summer: 175–93. Rais, Rasul Bakhsh. 2012. The Balochistan Package: Redefining Federalism in Pakistan, http://www.Balochistan/package/papers/drbakhshrais/ LLUMSfinaldec09:1– 38 Saez, Lawrence. 2002. Federalism Without a Centre: The Impact of Political and Economic Reforms on India’s Federal System, New Delhi: Sage Publications. Sharma, Pitamber. 2006. ‘Towards a Federal structure in Nepal’, The paper in its original form is available on the UNDP Constitution-building website in English and at http:/www.undp.org.np/consitutionbuilding/246 v Federalism in South Asia constitutiondesign/federalism/filefedeont%20english.pdf. Singh, M.P. and Rekha Saxena. 2013. Federalizing India in a Globalizing World, Delhi: Primus Books. Stepan, Alfred. 2010. ‘Federalism, Multinational Societies, and Negotiating a Democratic “State Nation”: A Theoretical Framework, the Indian Model and a Tamil Case Study’, in Sanjib Barua (ed.), Ethnonationalism in India: A Reader. New Delhi: Oxford University Press: 347–78. Balveer Arora and Douglas V. Verney (eds), Multipal Identities in a Single State: Indian Federalism in Comparative Perspectives, Delhi: Konark. Watts, R.L. 1966. New Federations: Experiment in the Commonwealth, Oxford: Clarendon Press.Watts, 1996. Comparing Federal Systems, Montreal & Kingston: McGill- Queen’s University Press., Watts,———. 2008. Comparing Federal Systems, Manfred: McGill-Queen’s University Press. Adeney, Katharine. 2007a . ‘Democracy and Federalism in Pakistan’ in Baogang He, Brian Galligan and Takashi Inoguchi (eds), Federalism in Asia, Cheltenham:Edward Semester IV 77 

x x

x

Elgar, 101–23; Adeney. 2007b. Federalism and Ethnic Conflict Regulation in India and Pakistan, New York: Palgrave. Rekha Saxena (ed.), Varieties of Federal Governance: Major Contemporary Models, New Delhi: Foundation Book, Cambridge University press,2011 Watts, R.L. 1966. New Federations: Experiment in the Commonwealth, Oxford: Clarendon Press.Watts. 1996. Comparing Federal Systems, Montreal & Kingston: McGill- Queen’s University Press; Watts, 2008. Comparing Federal Systems, Manfred: McGill-Queen’s University Press. Balveer Arora, KK Kailash, Rekkha Saxena, HK Suan,“Indian Federalism “ in Indian Democracy edited by K.C Suri , ICSSR Survey Research, New Delhi, OUP, 2013. (Coauthored).

78 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

CourseTitle:INTERNALDISPLACEMENTANDREFUGEEFLOWINSOUTHASIA CourseCode:KSͲ30ͲEA Credits=4:0:0 UNIT: I Introduction 1.1. Definitions: Refugees, Internally Displaced People, Forced Migration, etc. 1.2. South Asian Refugee Situation: A Global Perspective 1.3. The 1951 Refugee Convention and the Position of South Asian Countries 1.4. The Need for a Regional Legal Framework UNIT: II Displacement in the Partition and Its Impact on Culture and Identity 2.1. The Partition in 1947: Massive Dislocation; Facts and Figures 2.2. Post-Partition Recovery and Rehabilitation of Refugees 2.2.1. Challenges for the Newly Independent Nations 2.3. Crisis of Identity: Listening to the Victims and Witnesses; Archiving Memory 2.3.1. Collective Identity (Re)formation: Mediation 2.3.2. A Gendered Perspective UNIT: III Internal Displacement: The Kashmiri and Tamil Phenomena 3.1. Internal Displacement in South Asia: Example of Kashmir 3.1.1. Legal Safeguard for the Internally Displaced 3.1.2. The Prospect of Return and Re-integration 3.2. The Internal Displacement of the Tamil Population in Sri Lanka: Humanitarian Aspects UNIT: IV Afghan Refugee Experience 4.1. Perennial Wars, Ethnic Persecution and Displacement: The Afghan Picture 4.2. Voluntary Repatriation in the Recent Years by UNHCR 4.3. The Impact of Displacement and Repatriation on Economy

Semester IV 79 

Reading List x

Murshid, Navine. The Politics of Refugees in South Asia: Identity, Resistance, Manipulation. , 2014. Print.

x

Basu, Sibaji P. The Fleeing People of South Asia: Selections from Refugee Watch. New Delhi: Anthem Press, 2009. Internet resource.

x

Zamindar, Vazira F.-Y. The Long Partition and the Making of Modern South Asia: Refugees, Boundaries, Histories. New York: Columbia University Press, 2007. Internet resource.

x

KosiĔski, Leszek A, and K M. Elahi. Population Redistribution and Development in South Asia. Dordrecht: D. Reidel, 1985. Print.

x

Banerjee, Paula, Ray C. S. Basu, Samir K. Das, and Bishnu Adhikari. Internal Displacement in South Asia: The Relevance of the Un's Guiding Principles. New Delhi: Sage Publications, 2005. Print.

x

Datta, Antara. Refugees and Borders in South Asia: The Great Exodus of 1971. New York: Routledge, 2012. Print.

x

Chari, P R, Mallika Joseph, and Chandran D. Suba. Missing Boundaries: Refugees, Migrants, Stateless, and Internally Displaced Persons in South Asia. New Delhi: Manohar Publishers & Distributors, 2003. Print.

x

Ghosh, Partha S. Unwanted and Uprooted: A Political Study of Migrants, Refugees, Stateless and Displaced of South Asia. New Delhi: Saীsk৚iti, 2004. Print.

x

Kanitkar, Satish. Refugee Problems in South Asia. Delhi: Rajat Publications, 2000. Print.

x

Abrar, Chowdhury R, and Shahdeen Malik. Towards National Refugee Laws in South Asia. Dhaka: Refugee and Migratory Movements Research Unit, 2000. Print.

x

Sircar, Oishik. Engendering Persecution: Refugee Law, International Protection and Violence against Women in South Asia. New Delhi: WISCOMP, Foundation for Universal Responsibility of His Holiness The Dalai Lama, 2006. Print.

x

Chimni, B S. The Law and Politics of Regional Solution of the Refugee Problem: The Case of South Asia. Colombo: Regional Centre for Strategic Studies, 1998. Print.

x

Franda, Marcus F. Population Politics in South Asia. Hanover, N.H.: American Universities Field Staff, 1972. Print.

x

Khan, Gerrard. Citizenship and Statelessness in South Asia. Geneva: UNHCR, 2001. Print.

80 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

x

Muni, S D, and Lok R. Baral. Refugees and Regional Security in South Asia. Delhi, India: Konark Publishers, 1996. Print.

x

Ahmed, Imtiaz, Abhijit Dasgupta, and Kathinka Sinha-Kerkhoff. State, Society, and Displaced People in South Asia. Dhaka: University Press, 2004. Print.

x

Bose, Tapan K, and Rita Manchanda. States, Citizens and Outsiders: The Uprooted Peoples of South Asia. Kathmandu: South Asia Forum for Human Rights, 1997. Print.

x

Ghosh, Partha S. Migrants and Refugees in South Asia: Political and Security Dimensions. Shillong: North-Eastern Hill University Publications, 2001. Print.

Semester IV 81 

CourseTitle:SOCIALSCIENCERESEARCHMETHODSII CourseCode:KSͲ31ͲEA UNIT: I Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches 1.1. Scientific Method and Social Research 1.2. Qualitative and Quantitative methods: 1.2.1. Ethnographic Studies, 1.2.2. Case study 1.2.3. New Advances in Methods of Social Science Research UNIT II Tools/Methods of Data Collection 2.1. Observation as a Research Tool 2.2. Interview: Structured and Semi-Structured 2.3. Questionnaire 2.4. Case Study Method UNIT: III Analysing Data and Creating Narratives 3.1. Content Analysis 3.2. Computer Application for Research 3.3. Citation Rules 3.4. Presenting Research Findings UNIT IV Research Ethics 4.1. Significance of Research Ethics 4.2. Confidentiality and Anonymity 4.3. Regulatory and Legal Aspects 4.4. Plagiarism

82 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

Credits=4:0:0

Reading List x x x x x x

Neuman, W.L. 2009. Understanding Research. Boston, MA: Pearson. Galtung Johan, (1974), Theory and Methods of Social Research, George Allan and Unwin Ltd., New Delhi. Kothari C.R., (2008), Research MethodologyíMethods and Techniques, Wiley and Eastern Ltd., New Delhi. Bryman, Alan. (2004). Social Research Methods, 2nd edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Seale, Clive (ed.). (2004). Social Research Methods: A Reader. London: Routledge. Alvesson, M. and Sköldberg, K. (2000) Reflexive Methodology: New Vistas for Qualitative Research. London: Sage.

Semester IV 83 

CourseTitle:DEMOGRAPHYANDHEALTH CourseCode:KSͲ32ͲEA

Credits=4:0:0

UNIT: 1 Meaning, Scope and Sources of Data 1.1. Meaning, Scope and Subject Matter of Demography. 1.2. Sources of Demographic Data-Census, Vital Registration, Demographic and Health Surveys. 1.3. Theories of Population Growth: 1.3.1. Malthus 1.3.2. Demographic Transition Theory.

UNIT: II Population Growth and Distribution 2.1. Population Growth, Levels, Trends, World Patterns and South Asian Countries. 2.2. Distribution and Density of Population, World and South Asian patterns. 2.3. Fertility and Mortality and Infant Mortality in South Asia. UNIT: III Population Composition 3.1. Age Composition, Importance, Determinants, Dependency Burden. 3.2. Demographic Dividend 3.3. Youth Population, Composition, Education, Employment: Youth Health Behaviors UNIT: IV Women 4.1. Sex Composition, Importance, Measures and Determinants. 4.2. Level and Trends of Sex Ratio and Child Sex Ratio in South Asia and the World. 4.3. Women’s Empowerment, Literacy, Employment, Exposure to Mass Media, Decision Making, Maternal Health, Maternal Mortality, Domestic Violence.

84 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

Reading List x x

x x

x x

x x x x x x x

DHS – Demographic and Health Surveys (2005-2011), DHS Final Reports, Online: www.measuredhs.com. FAO (2006), The Double Burden of Malnutrition: Case Studies From Six Developing Countries, FAO Food and Nutrition Paper No. 84, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome. FAO (2011a), The State of Food Insecurity in the World: How Does International Price Volatility Affect Domestic FAO (2011b), Selected Indicators of Food and Agricultural Development in the AsiaPacific Region 2000-2010, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Bankok. Liu, L. et al. (2012), “Global, Regional, and National Causes of Child Mortality: An Updated Systematic Mathers, C. et al. (2005), “Counting the Dead and What They Died From: An Assessment of the Global Status of Cause of Death Data”, Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Vol. 83, No. 3, pp. 171-177. National Institute of Population Studies (NIPS) [Pakistan] and Macro International Inc. (2008), Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey 2006-07, Islamabad, Pakistan. OECD (2004), Towards High-Performing Health Systems, OECD Publishing, Paris, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264015562-en. OECD (2010a), Improving Value in Health Care. Measuring Quality, OECD Publishing, Paris, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264094819-en. OECD (2011), Health at a Glance 2011: OECD Indicators, OECD Publishing, Paris, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/health_glance-2011-en. OECD (2012c), Meeting the Water Reform Challenge, OECD Studies on Water, OECD Publishing, Paris. Sasayama, S. (2008), “Heart Disease in Asia”, Circulation, Vol. 118, No. 25, pp. 2669-2671. UNICEF (2008a), The State of Asia-Pacific’s Children 2008: Child Survival, UNICEF, New York.

Semester IV 85 

CourseTitle:RELIGIONSOFSOUTHASIA CourseCode:KSͲ33ͲEO

Credits=4:0:0

UNIT: I Introduction 1.1. What is Religion: A Conceptual/Theoretical Framework 1.2. Approaches and Methods 1.3. Unity of Religions (Wahadat al-adyan) 1.4. Inter-Religions Dialogue in the Contemporary World UNIT: II Major Religions I 2.1. Judaism: Chief Characteristics and Basic Teachings 2.2. Christianity: Basic Teachings, Important Christian Sects, a History of Catholics Protestants, Quraanic Perspective of IsaAS (Jesus) and Maryam, Position and Status of Christianity in the Contemporary World. 2.3. Zoroastrianism and Development: Basic Teachings and Concepts, Prominent Institutions 2.4. Jainism: History and Doctrines UNIT: III Major Religions II 3.1.Hinduism: Origin and Development, Chief Characteristics, Vedic Traditions, Modern Trends 3.2.Buddhism: Life of Buddha, Basic Teachings, Historical Development, Prominent Scholars 3.3.Islam: Origin and Development, Chief Characteristics, Key Concepts, Trends and Movements 3.4.Sikhism: Life and Teachings of Guru Nanak; History and Development UNIT: IV Religions in Kashmir 4.1. Hinduism in Kashmir: Advent, Development and Decline 4.2. Buddhism in Kashmir: Advent, Development and Decline 4.3. Islam in Kashmir: Advent and Development, Dissemination; Institutions, Trends and Different Dimensions of Islam in Kashmir 4.4. Religious Studies in Kashmir: Influence and Response

86 UNESCO Madanjeet Singh Institute of Kashmir Studies 

Reading List x x x x x x x

x x x x x

King, Anna (ed), Religions of South Asia. Dermot Killingley: University of Winchester, 2006. Nicholson, Andrew J., Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History. Columbia: Columbia University Press, 2010. Bellamy, Carla, The Powerful Ephemeral: Everyday Healing in an Ambiguously Islamic Place. California: The University of California Press, 2011. Iqtidar, Humeira, Secularizing Islamists?: Jama'at-e-Islami and Jama'at-ud-Da'wa in Urban Pakistan, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press 2011. Ricci, Ronit, Islam Translated: Literature, Conversion, and the Arabic Cosmopolis of South and Southeast Asia. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2011. Soneji, Davesh, Unfinished Gestures: Devadasis, Memory, and Modernity in South India. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2011 Wedemeyer , W Christian K., Making Sense of Tantric Buddhism: History, Semiology, and Transgression in the Indian Traditions. Columbia: Columbia University Press, 2012. Kim, Jinah, Receptacle of the Sacred: Illustrated Manuscripts and the Buddhist Book Cult in South Asia. California: The University of California Press, 2013 Patel. Deven M., Text to Tradition: The NaisadhƯyacarita and Literary Community in South Asia. Columbia: Columbia University Press, 2014. Esther Bloch, Marianne Keppens, Rajaram Hegde (eds.), Rethinking Religion in India: The Colonial Construction of Hinduism. New York: Routledge, 2011. Murphy, Anne (ed), Time, History and the Religious Imaginary in South Asia. New York: Routledge, 2011. Ferrari, Ferrari (ed), Health and Religious Rituals in South Asia. New York: Routledge, 2010.



Semester IV 87